Tag Archives: fashion

New Sportswear Logos Embroidered With Flowers and Vegetables by James Merry 

Iceland-based artist James Merry (previously) uses sportswear logos as the basis to his embroidered designs, planting thread-based mushrooms, strawberries, and various flowers on top of Nike swooshes and the ADIDAS logo’s three bars. Although you might not guess it from the simplicity of his sportswear alterations, Merry is a key collaborator with Björk, and has designed many of her costumes for tour and film. You can see more of his blossoming sports logos and elaborate costume designs on his website and Instagram.

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New Sculptural Eyewear Produced From Salvaged Street Metal and Found Objects by Cyrus Kabiru 

Kwa Kubadilishana Utamaduni, Macho Nne: At the Dot, 2017. 59 1/10 × 47 1/5 in

Self-taught Kenyan artist Cyrus Kabiru (previously) fashions extravagant eyewear from pieces of found metal and other salvaged materials on the streets of his hometown of Nairobi. Kabiru has been building his futuristic glasses since childhood, and dedicates much of his time to producing works for his C-Stunner series of eyeglasses and coordinating photographs. Recently Kabiru has begun to expand his work to include large non-body-based sculptures, installations, and collage.

Kabiru’s practice is deeply tied to Afrofuturism, a genre that combines science fiction, magical realism, and historical fiction with the culture and politics of the African diaspora. His work was featured in the newly released Gestalten publication Africa Rising: Fashion, Design and Lifestyle from Africa. You can see more of his eyewear and larger sculptures on Artsy and SMAC.

Kubwa Macho Nne – American Darts, 2015.

Kubwa Macho Nne – Tom and Jerry (2015)

Mali Ya Mfalme, Macho Nne | Nubia Kale (Ancient Nubia), 2016

Njia Ya Maisha Macho Nne Throwback, 2015

Njia Ya Maisha, Macho Nne Egyptian Peacock, 2015

Kwa Kubadilishana Utamaduni, Macho Nne: Catalan Sun, 2017

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A Collaborative Duo Pokes Fun at Plein Air Painting Through Photographic Series 

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Duo Hank Schmidt in der Beek and Fabian Schubert have been poking fun at plein air painting with a collaborative project since 2009, a humorous series of photographs shot by Schubert that captures in der Beek with his original paintings. Und im Sommer tu ich malen (which translates roughly to “And in the Summer I do Paint”) follows in der Beek to various locations in Europe where painters such as Paul Cezanne, Claude Monet, and Vincent Van Gogh have been inspired, but instead of painting the breathtaking views, he paints the pattern of his shirt instead. Looking out onto majestic views, in der Beek proudly stands with paintbrush in hand, vintage looking striped patterns appearing on both his body and the canvas.

The works have appeared in several solo and group exhibitions since the project began, however they are all together for the first time in a book recently published by Edition Taube. (via It’s Nice That)

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Artist Aki Inomata Provides Bagworms with Snippets of High Fashion to Create Matching Cocoons 

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Commenting on female consumer culture in Japan, artist Aki Inomata decided to dress female bagworms in extravagant attire, handing clippings of women’s dresses to the insects in order to transform them into protective cases. In nature, male bagworms shed these cases when they become moths. Females however, remain in these cases their entire lives, waiting patiently for the attention of a male. Reminded of the similarities to her own gender performance in Japan, Inomata exhibited her work with female bagworms at a department store that sells women’s clothing, her own commentary on what lengths women must still go to in order to be aesthetically accepted by society.

This is not the only time Inomata has worked with bugs or animals to alter their interpretation of the world. From 2009-2016 she crafted shells for hermit crabs based on differently global cities, and in 2009 she took French lessons with a parakeet. Inomata is represented by Maho Kubota Gallery in Tokyo and you can see more of her work on her website.

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New Wearable Textile Sculptures by Artist Mariko Kusumoto 

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Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA

Artist Mariko Kusumoto (previously) continues to amaze us with her ability to turn textiles into delicate orbs that can be worn as necklaces, brooches, and rings. While the artworks are often inspired by patterns or shapes found in nature, the pieces are left intentionally ambiguous as a way to engage the imagination. She shares in her artist statement:

My work reflects various, observable phenomena that stimulate my mind and senses; they can be natural or man-made. I ‘reorganize’ them into a new presentation that can be described as surreal, amusing, graceful, or unexpected. A playful, happy atmosphere pervades my work. I always like to leave some space for the viewer’s imagination; I hope the viewer experiences discovery, surprise, and wonder through my work.

Most of the pieces scene here are constructed with delicate polyester fabrics, a material that is both flexible in its application and extremely durable, allowing for her lightweight designs. You can see more of Kusumoto’s fiber explorations and metalwork at Mobilia Gallery and on her website.

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Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA

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Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA

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Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA

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Paint Splotch Embroidery by Olya Glagoleva and Lisa Smirnova 

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While working in the studio, paint is bound to drip, splatter, and brush up against an artist’s clothes, transforming a studio uniform into a chaotic collection of attractive mishaps. Designer Olya Glagoleva in collaboration with Russian artist Lisa Smirnova (previously) captured this look with an elegantly designed twist. All of the clothing included in their collection is embroidered in the style of Smirnova, with the markings of accidental paint drips and doodles adorning each of the jumpsuits, dresses, and smock-like blouses. The pieces are all one-of-a-kind, transforming the clothing into unique artworks that have taken nearly 100 hours to make. You can see more of Glagoleva’s designs with her line GO on her Instagram @go_with_olya, and more of Smirnova’s embroidery and illustrations on her own @lisa_smirnova. See more from this collection on Behance.

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