Tag Archives: fish

Stunning New Portraits of Siamese Fighting Fish by Visarute Angkatavanich

Stunning New Portraits of Siamese Fighting Fish by Visarute Angkatavanich fish

Stunning New Portraits of Siamese Fighting Fish by Visarute Angkatavanich fish

Stunning New Portraits of Siamese Fighting Fish by Visarute Angkatavanich fish

Stunning New Portraits of Siamese Fighting Fish by Visarute Angkatavanich fish

Stunning New Portraits of Siamese Fighting Fish by Visarute Angkatavanich fish

Stunning New Portraits of Siamese Fighting Fish by Visarute Angkatavanich fish

Stunning New Portraits of Siamese Fighting Fish by Visarute Angkatavanich fish

Stunning New Portraits of Siamese Fighting Fish by Visarute Angkatavanich fish

Bangkok-based photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously) continues to capture some of the most elegant portraits of fish we’ve seen. His intimate, crystal-clear photos of Siamese fighting fish (betta) make it seem as though they are suspended in air instead of water. Angkatavanich recently told Popular Photography that he only started photographing the fish after encountering them for the first time three years ago at a fish show and has since become obsessed with the different species which vary greatly in size, shape, and color patterns. Limited edition prints of his work are now available through La Lanta Fine Art.

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Tiny Shrimp-like Organisms Try to Illuminate the Insides of Fish That Eat Them

Tiny Shrimp like Organisms Try to Illuminate the Insides of Fish That Eat Them science fish biology

Tiny Shrimp like Organisms Try to Illuminate the Insides of Fish That Eat Them science fish biology

Tiny Shrimp like Organisms Try to Illuminate the Insides of Fish That Eat Them science fish biology

No, these aren’t light vomiting fish, though you would be forgiven for thinking so because that’s exactly what it looks like. What you’re seeing is the defense mechanism of a tiny crustacean called an ostracod, a shrimp-like organism about 1mm in size that some fish accidentally eat while hunting for plankton. When eaten by a translucent cardinalfish, the ostracod immediately releases a bioluminescent chemical in an attempt to illuminate the fish from the inside, making it immediately identifiable to predators. WHAT. Not wanting to be eaten, the cardinalfish immediately spits out the ostracod, resulting in little underwater fish fireworks. What an incredible game of evolutionary cat and mouse. The clip above is from a new show on BBC Two called Super Senses. If you’re in the UK you can watch it online in HD for a few more days. (via For Science Sake)

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New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye resin painting fish

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye resin painting fish

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye resin painting fish

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye resin painting fish

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye resin painting fish

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye resin painting fish

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye resin painting fish

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye resin painting fish

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye resin painting fish

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye resin painting fish

With the exception of the repurposed containers, almost every aspect of these artworks by Singapore-based artist Keng Lye (previously) has been rendered in acrylic paint, carefully applied within layers of clear resin. A fish in a plastic bag, a tin can of tadpoles swirling under a frog on a lilypad, and even a completely convincing betta constructed from carved resin and painted with acrylic—each work a strange, lifelike amalgam of painting and sculpture. These are just a few of Lye’s work over the last year, you can see more over on Facebook.

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Generic Plastic Bubble Wrap Transformed into Mini Goldfish Bowls by Daisuke Akiyama

Generic Plastic Bubble Wrap Transformed into Mini Goldfish Bowls by Daisuke Akiyama packaging fish

Created by Tokyo-based designer Daisuke Akiyama, this packaging concept effectively turns the small air pockets of plastic bubble wrap into miniature fish bowls. Akiyama says the novel idea is an attempt to make the irresistible plastic bubbles “psychologically more difficult to pop.” Currently the idea is just a prototype, but supposedly he’s working on marketing the idea to a manufacturer. (via NOTCOT, Spoon & Tamago)

Update: Many have questioned if the fish used in the concept are real. They are not. These are images printed inside plastic bubbles.

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An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

In most post-apocalyptic films when the camera pans down the abandoned streets of New York or Tokyo, long after people have disappeared and the buildings have fallen into disrepair, we see nature again thriving. Trees and plants take hold in the sidewalks and wild animals like deer, bears, and lions stalk the ruins left behind by humans. But after descending the staircase at a vacant shopping mall in Bangkok, professional cook and photographer Jesse Rockwell discovered a wholly different take on beasts inheriting the Earth: fish. Specifically exotic koi and catfish, teeming by the thousands in a secret subterranean aquarium. Rockwell shares via his blog:

New World shopping mall, a four storey former shopping mall. Originally constructed as an eleven storey building. It was found to be in breach of old town Bangkok’s four storey limit on building heights. The top seven floors were demolished to adhere to building codes in 1997. In 1999 the mall burned due to suspected arson committed by a competitor in the area. The disaster resulted in several casualties, and the building has remained abandoned ever since. Not having a roof, the basement floor remains under several feet of water year round.

At some point in the early 2000s an unknown person began introducing a small population of exotic Koi and Catfish species. The small population of fish began to thrive and the result is now a self-sustained, and amazingly populated urban aquarium.

What an amazing discovery. It makes you wonder what else lurks in abandoned places around the world? You can see more of Rockwell’s photography over on 500px and on his website, Taste of the Road. (via James Theophane, The Verge)

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Artist ‘Roadsworth’ Continues to Transform Streets, Buildings and Sidewalks into a Visual Playground

Artist Roadsworth Continues to Transform Streets, Buildings and Sidewalks into a Visual Playground street art Montréal fish birds

Artist Roadsworth Continues to Transform Streets, Buildings and Sidewalks into a Visual Playground street art Montréal fish birds

Artist Roadsworth Continues to Transform Streets, Buildings and Sidewalks into a Visual Playground street art Montréal fish birds

Artist Roadsworth Continues to Transform Streets, Buildings and Sidewalks into a Visual Playground street art Montréal fish birds

Artist Roadsworth Continues to Transform Streets, Buildings and Sidewalks into a Visual Playground street art Montréal fish birds

Artist Roadsworth Continues to Transform Streets, Buildings and Sidewalks into a Visual Playground street art Montréal fish birds

Artist Roadsworth Continues to Transform Streets, Buildings and Sidewalks into a Visual Playground street art Montréal fish birds

Montreal artist Roadsworth (previously) continues to make his mark on the streets of Montreal by introducing elements of wildlife and humor onto an asphalt canvas. In his latest pieces we see flocks of geese swooping down tree-lined streets and schools of sardines move with the flow of pedestrian traffic (or end up wedged inside a tin can), unexpected symbols against an urban backdrop.

This year marks a decade since Roadsworth was charged with 53 counts of public mischief, after which he received considerable public support and was let go with a slap on the wrist. Since then the artist has created artwork for municipalities, exhibitions, and arts festivals around the world. You can see much more on his website, and he also has a book.

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The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping plants fish aquariums Forest Scent, Pavel Bautin. Russia. 2010 IAPLC Grand Prize Winner

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping plants fish aquariums
Pale Wind, Takayuki Fukada. Japan. 2013 IAPLC Gold Prize

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping plants fish aquariums
Whisper of the pines, Serkan Çetinkol. Turkey. 2013 IAPLC Top 27

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping plants fish aquariums
Verve!, Chow Wai Sun. Hong Kong. 2011 IAPLC Bronze Prize

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping plants fish aquariums
Way to heaven, Dmitriy Parshin. Russia.

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping plants fish aquariums
Wild West, Stjepan Erdeljić. Croatia.

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping plants fish aquariums
Georgi Chaushev, Bulgaria. 2012 IAPLC Top 100.

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping plants fish aquariums
Francisco Wu, Spain. 2012 IAPLC Top 100.

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping plants fish aquariums
Long Tran Hoang, Vietnam. 2012 IAPLC Third Place.

The Incredible Underwater Art of Competitive Aquascaping plants fish aquariums
Pilgrimage, Shintaro Matsui. Japan. 2013 IAPLC Fifth Place.

No, these aren’t exactly your childhood goldfish bowls. The world of competitive aquarium design, or aquascaping, is just as difficult, expensive, and cutthroat as any other sport but requires expertise in many different fields to guarantee success. Aquarium designers possess large amounts of expertise in biology, design, photography, and excel in the art of patience, as individual aquascapes can take months if not years to fully mature into a completed landscape.

The world’s largest nature aquarium and aquatic plants layout competition is the International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest (IAPLC) which annually ranks hundreds of competitors from around the world with Asian and Eastern European countries generally dominating the top slots. While it’s somewhat difficult to track down galleries of winners from every year, above are some amazing entries from the last few years. To see more, oh so much more, check out: IAPLC Grand Prize Works, IAPLC 2011 Top 27, IAPLC 2013 Top 6, IAPLC 2012 Top 200 (or here), and the first Eastern European Planted Aquarium Design Contest.

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