Tag Archives: flowers

Tiny Paper Flowers Inspired by Pencil Shavings by Haruka Misawa 

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All images via Haruka Misawa

Attracted to the shape of the shavings that were formed while sharpening her pencil, designer Haruka Misawa decided to explore how they could be formed into realistic flowers. Printing paper with a color gradation, she tightly wraps it in a pencil-like shape so the flowers blossom outward when scraped against the shaver. Each flower created in this method is completely unique, Misawa’s technique making it impossible to replicate the same design of each of her 15-40 mm flowers twice.

You can see more of Misawa’s designs on her Instagram. (via Faith is Torment and This Isn’t Happiness)

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Cherry Blossoms Flood the Inokashira Park Lake in Tokyo 

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

Every spring, photographer Danilo Dungo spends time at Inokashira Park in Tokyo, famous for its abundance of blooming cherry trees. The photographer has become a master at capturing the event from all angles, especially with aerial shots that show the pink flowers covering the nearby lake. Seen here are a handful of shots from the last two years, but you can explore much more on his NatGeo Your Shot page. (via Fubiz)

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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A Deconstructed Garden Suspended in the Air by Rebecca Louise Law 

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All images courtesy of Bikini Berlin

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To celebrate spring, London-based artist Rebecca Louise Law (previously) has placed 30,000 live flowers in the atrium of German Bikini Berlin, suspending a colorful garden above the heads of the store’s visitors with copper wire. The deconstructed floral arrangement was donated by Dutch Toll was blumen machen and designed to be an installation that would dry over the time of its placement in the space.

“The installation is designed to be an inviting, enchanting celebration of the outdoors and of spring color,” said Law. “We decided to name the sculpture simply, ‘Garten’ the German word for garden, in keeping with the simple, understated post-war design statement made by the Bikini Berlin building itself.”

You can walk beneath the flowers of Law’s Garten through May 1, 2016. (via Designboom)

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X-Ray Photographs From the 1930s Expose the Delicate Details of Roses and Lilies 

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“Lotus,” ca. 1930, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches. All imagery courtesy Joseph Bellows Gallery.

When selecting flowers we are often first attracted to their vibrant colors, eager to choose a bright orange lily or deep red rose. Dr. Dain L. Tasker, an early 20th century radiologist, was attracted to a different feature of the blooms—their anatomy. Using X-ray film to highlight the soft layering of petals and leaves, Tasker produced ghostly images devoid of color, each image appearing more like an ink drawing than photograph.

Born in 1872 in Beloit, Wisconsin, Tasker was the chief radiologist at the Wilshire Hospital in Los Angeles when radiology was in its first stages of exploration. He first became interested in photography in the 20s, focusing his hobby on landscape and portraiture. It wasn’t until the the 30s that he began to connect his career and hobby, moving his photographic interests to the X-ray machine and singling out flowers from his previously photographed landscape environments.

By composing images with singular flowers Taker examined their individualistic qualities rather than focusing on how they might be found grouped in nature or a bouquet. These minimal compositions contain a romantic appreciation for his subject matter. “Flowers are the expression of the love life of plants,” he said in a statement.

A selection of Tasker’s X-ray images can be seen in the exhibition “Floral Studies” at Joseph Bellows Gallery in La Jolla, California which runs through February 19, 2016. (via Hyperallergic)

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“A Rose,” 1936, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches

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“Yellow Calla Lily,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 1/4 inches

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“untitled, (lily),” 1932, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 inches

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“Philodendron,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 inches

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“Peruvian Daffodil,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches

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“Fuchsia,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 9 1/2 x 7 1/4 inches

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“Delphinium,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches

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“Tulip,” 1931, vintage gelatin silver print, 9 x 7 inches

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“California Holly,” 1937, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 1/8 inches

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Photos of the First Flower Grown in Space 

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As part of a new series of experiments aboard the International Space Station to study how plants grow in microgravity, astronauts have planted and cultivated an entire flower garden. This weekend, astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted a signficant step in their research: this firey zinnia bloom, the first flower grown entirely in space. Plants like lettuce have aready been grown and eaten aboard the ISS, but the VEG-01 project is meant to explore how astronauts will eventually grow more complex foods like tomatoes. (via Neatorama)

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Blooms of Insect Wings Created by Photographer Seb Janiak 

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Mimesis – Fecunditatis, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

Mimesis is an ongoing photomontage project by Paris-based photographer Seb Janiak that depicts the wings of insects as the petals of flowers. Janiak is deeply interested in the mechanisms behind mimicry in nature, where an organism develops appendages, textures, and colors that directly mirror its surroundings. This process involves a strange interaction between different organisms he describes as “a complex co-evolutionary mechanism involving three species: the model, the imitator and the dupe.”

To create each artwork Janiak scours antique stores and taxidermist shops to find examples of wings which he then photographs at extremely high resolution. The pieces are digitally edited and pieced together into flower-like forms (a sort of meta mimic of a mimic) which are then output as chromogenic prints measuring nearly 6 feet square.

The Mimesis series, which now comprises 22 pieces, was shown for the first time at the Photo Shanghai art fair last September. The series also won an IPA Lucy award earlier this year. All images courtesy the artist. (via My Modern Met)

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Mimesis – Lubon Tranquillitatis, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

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Mimesis – Lubhyati Solitudinis, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

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Mimesis – Lacus Luxuriae, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

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Mimesis – Hibiscus Trinium, 2012. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

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Mimesis – Aphyllae Maleakht, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

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Mimesis – Precognitus Christium, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

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Mimesis – Tradescantia Ganymedia, 2012. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

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Mimesis – Precognitus Christium, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

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Mimesis – Ornithogale Venusiaïs, 2012. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

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