Tag Archives: flowers

Handmade Resin Bangles Embedded with Flowers and Bark

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Hand-made in Coos Bay, Oregon, these resin bangles are infused with plants, leaves, flowers, shells, and strips of bark. Much of what you see here is available through Faerie and dozens of additional pieces are available through Etsy. (via Crafty Allegieance)

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Elkebana: Symmetrical Flower Wall Trophies Inspired by Japanese ‘Ikebana’ Flower Arrangements

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If you enjoy the aesthetic appeal of animal antlers but hate the idea of taxidermy, Elkebana might be just the thing for your cabin walls. The wall-mounted system relies on symmetrical sets of flowers or tree branches and gets its name from ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arrangement. You can see more over on their website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Delicate Vessels Sculpted with Pressed Flowers by Ignacio Canales Aracil

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Spanish artist Ignacio Canales Aracil creates vessels reminiscent of upside-down baskets using nothing but pressed flowers. The art of flower pressing dates back thousands of years; pressed flowers were reportedly discovered in a 3,000-year-old coffin of Tutankhamun’s mother in Egypt, and both Greek and Roman botanists were known to preserve plants using techniques that continue today. But Aracil’s method is a bit different, relying on large cone-shaped molds into which carefully woven patches of hand-picked flower stems are placed. The pieces dry for up to a month without the aid of adhesives and are sprayed with a light varnish to protect the sculpture from moisture. The final pieces, which could be crushed with even the slightest weight, are rigid enough to stand without support.

Aracil currently has work as part of a group show at Lucia Mendoza gallery in Madrid through the end of February, and you can see much more over on his website.

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Iced Flowers: Exotic Floral Bouquets Locked in Blocks of Ice by Makoto Azuma

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The self-described botanic artist Makoto Azuma is trying to change the way we look at flowers. He’s used water and the stratosphere as backdrops for his exotic flower arrangements but now he’s experimenting with ice. In his latest exhibition “Iced Flowers,” Azuma locks floral bouquets in large blocks of ice and displays them like pillars. Placed in an inorganic chamber, the “flowers will show unique expressions that they do not display in everyday life,” says Azuma. The installation, held last week in Japan, was temporary by nature but the artist made sure to preserve the images. (syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Flowerworks: Flowers Arranged and Photographed to Look Like Fireworks by Sarah Illenberger

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Flowerworks is a new series by multi-disciplinary artist Sarah Illenberg that turns flower arrangements into bursting fireworks. The photos were made in collaboration with photographer Sabrina Rynas, and if you squint your eyes a bit (or back away from the monitor) the effect is pretty uncanny. Illenberg is widely known for her work at the intersection of art, photography, and graphic design, and you can see more of her work for some of the world’s top brands and magazines in her portfolio. Fine art prints from this series are available in her shop. (via ArtChipel)

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Mona Caron’s Murals of Weeds Slowly Overtake Walls and Buildings

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As part of her ongoing Weeds project, artist Mona Caron (previously) has begun photographing the progress of her murals step-by-step, creating short animations of growing plants in public spaces. Caron has recently painted murals of weeds in her native Switzerland, India, and around her current home in San Francisco in what she describes as “a tribute to the resilience of all those beings who no one made room for, were not part of the plan, and yet keep coming back, pushing through and rising up.” Definitely watch the video above to see more of these plants coming to life, and you can learn more here. (via Laughing Squid)

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Bathroom Fixtures at Alcatraz Transformed into Porcelain Floral Bouquets by Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom (2014). All photos by Jan Sturman

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

The Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei currently has an exhibition on Alcatraz, the notorious island used as a military fortress and federal penitentiary. Amongst a large body of work created specifically for Alcatraz is “Blossom,” which has been installed in several hospital ward cells and medical offices. And as its name suggests, intricately detailed encrustations of ceramic flowers are blossoming out of sinks, toilets and tubs that were once used by hospitalized prisoners.

The curator offers two possibilities in interpreting Ai’s porcelain blossoms: a symbolic offering of comfort to the imprisoned or perhaps an ironic nod to China’s famous Hundred Flowers Campaign of 1956. But to understand the piece we think this quote by Ai himself is all you really need: “The misconception of totalitarianism is that freedom can be imprisoned. This is not the case. When you constrain freedom, freedom will take flight and land on a windowsill.”

Ai Weiwei’s exhibition on Alcatraz will be open through April 26, 2015. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

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