flowers

Posts tagged
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Photography

Aerial Photographs of Tulip Fields in the Netherlands by Normann Szkop

January 31, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Abstract rainbows of color fill the landscape in these beautiful photos by French photographer Normann Szkop (nsfw-ish) who hopped in a Cesna with pilot Claython Pender to soar above the tulip fields in Anna Paulowna, a town in North Holland. Collectively, the millions of neatly planted flowers create sprawling patterns and designs that tourists flock to witness with their own eyes every season. See the entire 100+ photograph set over on Flickr. (via twisted sifter)

 

 



Photography Science

Frost Flowers Blooming in the Arctic Ocean are Found to be Teeming with Life

December 11, 2012

Christopher Jobson

These beautiful and other-worldly photographs of ice were taken last year by University of Washington graduate student Jeff Bowman and his professor Jody Deming while they worked on a study combining oceanography, microbiology, and planetary sciences in the central Arctic Ocean as part of the Integrated Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT) program. Their single focus was the study of frost flowers, a strange phenomenon where frost grows from imperfections in the surface ice amid extreme sub-zero temperatures nearing -22C or -7.6F, forming spiky structures that have been found to house microorganisms. In fact, the bacteria found in the frost flowers is much more dense than in the frozen water below it, meaning each flower is essentially a temporary ecosystem, not unlike a coral reef. Via IGERT:

Around their research icebreaker in the central Arctic Ocean new ice grows on long open cracks that network amongst the thick floes of pack ice. Abruptly the surface of this new ice changes texture. The cold, moist air above the open cracks becomes saturated and frost begins to form wherever an imperfection can be found on the ice surface. From these nucleation points the flower-like frost structures grow vertically, quickly rising to centimeters in height. The hollow tendrils of these “frost flowers” begin to wick moisture from the ice surface, incorporating salt, marine bacteria, and other substances as they grow. The fog dissipates and the Arctic sun lights the surface of the frost flowers, initiating a cascade of chemical reactions. These reactions can produce formaldehyde, deplete ozone, and actually alter the chemical composition of the lower atmosphere. […] Bowman and Deming have discovered that bacteria are consistently more abundant in frost flowers than in sea ice. Since microscopic pockets in sea ice are known to support an active community of psychrophiles (cold-loving microorganisms), even in the coldest months of the year, these results are encouraging.

Bowman and Deming are currently building an ultra-clean chamber where they can grow artificial frost flowers and hope that their research leads to a better understanding of how life might be able to survive in extreme conditions elsewhere in the universe. Amazing! Photos by Matthias Wietz. (via the daily what)

 

 



Art

Towering Sculptures Made of Flowers on Display at Bloemencorso, A Flower Parade in Zundert, Netherlands

November 8, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Aside from being consistently ranked as one of the best countries to live in on Earth, file this as reason #4,123 to stop by the Netherlands: Bloemencorso, the annual parade of flowers in Zundert. That’s right, every float here is made from natural flowers, specifically dahlias. From twisting architectural structures the size of houses to bizarre animatronic birds and puppets, and even animals made from swooping gestures reminiscent of graffiti, Bloemencorso seems to have a little bit of everything. Despite the relatively small nature of Zundert (a small town north east of Belgium with a population of about 20,000) the variety of and ingenuity of these sculptures seems to know no bounds. I’ve embedded an hour-long video of the entire parade from 2012 above, it’s worth skipping around a bit to see everything, and you can see more videos on the event website and in this gallery. Want to see it in person? You’ll need to wait until next year, the next event happens September 1 and 2 of 2013. (thnx, kjeld!)

 

 



Photography

Flowers Soaked in Liquid Nitrogen Shatter on Impact

September 7, 2012

Christopher Jobson






In his Broken Flower series photographer Jon Shireman soaked various kinds of flowers in a liquid nitrogen bath for up to 30 minutes before using a special spring-loaded contraption to slam them against a surface at high speed. He then photographed the hundreds of fragments spread across a white surface like sharp glass shards. Beautiful work. See the rest over on Flickr. (via photojojo)

 

 



Art

A Floral Gradient by Jake Evans

July 12, 2012

Christopher Jobson

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UK artist Jake Evans made this intriguing cut flower gradient as part of his latest body of work titled Flora Sway II. Read an interview with the artist over on It’s Nice That.

 

 



Art Photography

Flower Mandalas by Kathy Klein

June 22, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I’m loving the vibrant colors and the meticulous placement of every leaf, flower petal, and pine cone is these natural mandalas by Arizona artist Kathy Klein. The pieces are called danmalas (‘the giver of garlands’ in Sanskrit), and after each is formed and photographed Klein leaves them where they were created as a gift to whoever discovers them. (via things organized neatly)

 

 



Photography

High Speed Liquid Flowers Photographed by Jack Long

May 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

At a quick glance these colorful photographs by Milwaukee-based photographed Jack Long might pass as some kind of strange exotic flowers, but a squint of the eyes later reveals they are actually high speed photographs of colored water, captured in a way to mimic the shape of blooms, leaves, and even pots.

Each photograph from Long’s Vessels and Blooms series is captured in a stunningly precise take that took months of trial and error to perfect. Like a mad scientist he creates cocktails of dyes, thickeners, and pigments for each component of the shot and then blasts them through a customized mechanism before snapping a perfectly timed capture. “This series was a culmination of months of planning and testing. Hundreds of captures are made in testing and then many more during the actual final capture stage. A very few stand out as being the best,” he says. You can see much more of his work on Flickr and 500px. (via oddity central)