Tag Archives: forests

Three-Dimensional Landscapes Formed with Layered Acrylic Photographs by Nobuhiro Nakanishi 

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

Japanese artist Nobuhiro Nakanishi creates sculptural works that attempt to preserve a singular moment in the natural world, capturing deeply pigmented sunsets and brightly-lit forests in a series he’s titled Layer Drawings. To produce the three-dimensional installations, Nakanishi first photographs an environment over a period of time. He then mounts selected images from his documentation on panels of acrylic in chronological order, allowing slight variation from frame to frame.

“We are all subject to the passing of time, yet each of us feels and perceives it in our own way,” says Nakaniski, “Time itself has no shape or boundary and cannot be fixed or grasped. When we look at the photographs in these sculptures, we attempt to fill in the gaps between the individual images. We draw from our physical experiences to fill in missing time and space, both ephemeral and vague. In this series, I attempt to depict time and space as sensations shared by both viewer and artist.”

Nakaniski is represented by Yukimo Chiba Associates in Tokyo. You can see more of his layered works on his website. (via Tu Recepcja)

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan
 (2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

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Friendly Giants Built From Recycled Wood Hidden in the Forests of Copenhagen 

Danish artist Thomas Dambo works on large-scale sculptures with recycled materials, having completed 25 wooden works around the world in just under three years. His latest project, The Six Forgotten Giants, is based in his hometown of Copenhagen, a project that builds and hides friendly giants throughout the city’s forests. Using a treasure map, visitors can find the oversized creatures, each of which comes with a poem that describes a bit of their personality.

All of the giants are produced from recycled wood, material that was gathered by Dambo and his team from 600 pallets, a shed, an old fence, and various other sources. Using local volunteers to build the works, Dambo then names each sculpture after one of the builders, such as Teddy Friendly seen below. You can see more images of the oversized sculptures on Dambo’s website. (via Bored Panda)

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Members of a Brazilian Indigenous Tribe Projected Onto the Amazon Rainforest by Photographer Philippe Echaroux 

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In a gesture to draw attention to the massive deforestation ravaging the Amazon rainforest, French photographer and street artist Philippe Echaroux projected the faces of indigenous Brazilians onto the forest’s trees. The projected images demonstrate the deep connection between the rainforest and its inhabitants, acknowledging the need for the preservation of their home and resources.

The photographs focus on the Suruí tribe of Brazil which is led by Chief Almir Surui Narayamoga and was asked by the Brazilian government to help replant their section of the rainforest in order to ensure and protect its longevity. Echaroux was invited by Chief Narayamoga to bring attention to the issue, which he highlighted through his projections.

Photographs from this series will be on display in the exhibition “The Crying Forest” at Galerie Taglialatella in Paris opening November 11 and running through December 15, 2016. You can see more of Echaroux’s work on his websiteInstagram, and Facebook, as well as a behind-the-scenes making of his work (in French) below. (via PetaPixel)

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The Crooked Forest: A Mysterious Grove of 400 Oddly Bent Pine Trees in Poland 

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This stand of bent pine trees known as the Crooked Forest is easily one of the strangest places in Central Europe. Located outside of Nowe Czarnowo, West Pomerania, Poland, the nearly 400 trees are widely agreed to have been shaped by human hands sometime in the 1930s, but for what purposes is still up for debate. Each tree is bent near the base at 90 degrees, a form that could possibly be helpful in boat or furniture making. Strangely enough, every tree is bent in exactly the same direction: due North. A quick search online reveals a host of conspiracy theories ranging from witchcraft to energy fields.

Whatever the reason, we’re glad photographer Kilian Schönberger (previously) stopped by to capture these photos. You can see more from the series on Behance.

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Update: Thank you all for your many, many suggestions about the trees. We’ve heard everything from floods to furniture to fire. There still doesn’t seem to be a consensus.

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A New Book Celebrates the 200 Most Beautiful and Innovative Cabins Ever Designed 

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Built as retreats for solitude and reflection, cabins are typically found in remote areas, tucked into the forest-filled corners of civilization. Due to their remote nature, they are often secreted from the public eye, unless you know the right path to explore. However, as a group of friends (including co-founder of Vimeo, Zach Klein) began to collect inspiration for cabin building projects, they discovered a vast array of outdoor structures and tree-houses with unique architecture on the backroads of America and around the world. They quickly began to document their discoveries online, and the Cabin Porn site was born.

Cabin Porn grew over the course of six years to amass a following of over 350,000 on Tumblr and became a visual bastion for architects, camping aficionados, and anyone craving an escape with a collection of over 12,000 cabin designs. The site has now been transformed into a printed book by the same name, Cabin Porn, a collection that adds narrative to the spaces first documented online to include interior photography, new homes, and advice from cabin makers that touch on subjects from how to live underground to crafting an off-grid bunkhouse.

The book narrows down its sprawling inspiration to just 200 cabins and hopes to not only present the aesthetic of these cabins, but the feel they elicit in their construction. “Inside each of us is a home ready to be built,” says the book’s website. “It takes a supply of ambition and materials to construct a cabin, but the reward is handsome: a shelter for yourself somewhere quiet, and a place to offer warm hospitality to friends.”

Cabin Porn can now be found on Amazon. Take a peek inside the book, and watch a lovely trailer below.

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If a Tree Falls in the Forest… These Megaphones Will Amplify Its Sound 

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All images by Tõnu Tunnel

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The soothing sounds of nature have never been easier to hear after a group of interior architecture students from the Estonian Academy of Arts decided to infiltrate a nearby forest with three giant wooden microphones. The sound-amplifying installation is near RMK’s pähni nature centre, an area where one can currently rest within the grooves of one of three megaphones to intently listen to the detailed rustling of leaves or chirping of birds both near and far.

Valdur Mikita, a writer who has often covered the way Estonian culture is tied to the 51% of forests that comprise it said, “It’s a place to listen, to browse the audible book of nature – there hasn’t really been a place like that in Estonia before.”

According to interior architect Hannes Praks the three-metre diameter megaphones will act as a “bandstand” for the environment around it. “We’ll be placing the three megaphones at such a distance and at a suitable angle, so at the centre of the installation, sound feed from all three directions should create a unique merged surround sound effect,” said Praks.

The structures will not only be available for solo meditation, but also serve as stages for intimate events and protective structures for spending the night in the woods—which in this forest you can do for free. (via Mental Floss)

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