Tag Archives: fossils

Artistic Arrangements of Microscopic Algae Viewed Through a Microscope

Artistic Arrangements of Microscopic Algae Viewed Through a Microscope science fossils algae
Photograph of diatoms collected in Russia and arranged on a microscope slide in 1952 by A.L. Brigger.

Artistic Arrangements of Microscopic Algae Viewed Through a Microscope science fossils algae
Photograph of fossil diatoms collected in Pt. Reyes National Seashore in Marin County, California, and arranged on a microscope slide in 1968 by A.L. Brigger.

Artistic Arrangements of Microscopic Algae Viewed Through a Microscope science fossils algae
Black and white photograph of fossil radiolaria arranged on a slide by R.F. Behan. The slide label reads “Prize Medal Paris 1867 Polycystina; Springfield, Barbados.” The arrangement is approximately 3 millimeters in diameter.

Artistic Arrangements of Microscopic Algae Viewed Through a Microscope science fossils algae
Photograph of diatoms arranged on a microscope slide by W.M. Grant.

Artistic Arrangements of Microscopic Algae Viewed Through a Microscope science fossils algae
Photograph of diatoms arranged on a microscope slide by W.M. Grant.

Artistic Arrangements of Microscopic Algae Viewed Through a Microscope science fossils algae
Photograph of diatoms arranged in October 1974 on a microscope slide by R.I. Firth. The slide label reads “Selected species from Californian fossil marine localities. To Mrs. G Dallas Hanna with compliments.”

Artistic Arrangements of Microscopic Algae Viewed Through a Microscope science fossils algae
Photograph of Arachnoidiscus diatoms collected in the Bolinas Lagoon in Marin County, California and arranged on a microscope slide by R.F. Behan.

In a fascinating blend of art and science the California Academy of Sciences possesses a rare collection of microscopic diatom arrangements. Diatoms are a major group of algae that are among the smallest organisms on Earth, of which nearly 100,000 different species are estimated to exist. While there are numerous examples of diatoms that have been photographed for scientific study, these particular scientists hobbyists seem to have gone a different direction, instead turning these tiny unicellular lifeforms into mandala-like artworks. The tiny designs are all the more amazing when you consider most of them would fit on the head of a nail. You can see more examples right here. Photos by Sara Mansfield. (via Synaptic Stimuli)

Update: The California Academy of Sciences clarifies that these arrangements, despite being produced with scientific tools, are purely aesthetic, and were produced by hobbyists, not scientists.

Circuit Board Fossils, Paintings and Other Found Object Sculptures by Peter McFarlane

Circuit Board Fossils, Paintings and Other Found Object Sculptures by Peter McFarlane sculpture reycling fossils computers assemblage

Circuit Board Fossils, Paintings and Other Found Object Sculptures by Peter McFarlane sculpture reycling fossils computers assemblage

Circuit Board Fossils, Paintings and Other Found Object Sculptures by Peter McFarlane sculpture reycling fossils computers assemblage

Circuit Board Fossils, Paintings and Other Found Object Sculptures by Peter McFarlane sculpture reycling fossils computers assemblage

Circuit Board Fossils, Paintings and Other Found Object Sculptures by Peter McFarlane sculpture reycling fossils computers assemblage

Circuit Board Fossils, Paintings and Other Found Object Sculptures by Peter McFarlane sculpture reycling fossils computers assemblage

Circuit Board Fossils, Paintings and Other Found Object Sculptures by Peter McFarlane sculpture reycling fossils computers assemblage

Circuit Board Fossils, Paintings and Other Found Object Sculptures by Peter McFarlane sculpture reycling fossils computers assemblage

Circuit Board Fossils, Paintings and Other Found Object Sculptures by Peter McFarlane sculpture reycling fossils computers assemblage

Mixed media and installation artist Peter McFarlane has spent his life turning found objects, computer waste and other discarded materials into sculptures, installations, and even the backdrops of paintings. Of his work McFarlane says:

To me, waste is just lack of imagination. This belief carries beyond the boundaries of my art production and permeates most aspects of my life. Most of my home and studio, and much of everything in them, is recycled. I’ve always had an epic imagination along with a driving desire to make things. Thus, used objects have pared my options down to a workable, manageable level. No object is beyond artistic merit, meaning and metaphor. So why throw it out? The materials of my work are connected intrinsically to my ideas, be they tailored beyond recognition or left as found. Each piece I make resurrects an object as an idea specific to the material and the meaning inherent in its use. The history of the object — from the manufacture to the dumpster — embellishes its contexts and the possibilities I have to manipulate them. I have often made a connection with the objects that I’ve used in my everyday life or work experience: that which I know.

You can see much more of his work over at Saatchi Online as well as in his portfolio and he recently had a show of chainsaw sculptures (!) at Pegasus Gallery in Salt Spring Island, British Columbia just last month.