Tag Archives: fruit

A Variety of Unprocessed Foods Cut into Uncannily Precise 2.5cm Cubes by Lernert & Sander

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In 2014, Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant contacted conceptual design studio Lernert & Sander to create a piece for a special documentary photography issue about food. Lernert & Sander responded with this somewhat miraculous photo of 98 unprocessed foods cut into extremely precise 2.5cm cubes aligned on a staggered grid. Looking at the shot it seems practically impossible, but the studio confirms it is indeed the real thing. The photo is available as a limited edition print of 50 copies printed on 40 x 50cm baryta paper signed by the artists for about €500. You can learn more on their website. (via iGNANT)

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Photographer Brittany Wright Captures Foods in Colorful Gradients

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All images © Brittany Wright

Photographer and food enthusiast Brittany Wright sets up intricate culinary still lifes that focus primarily on the differentiation of fruits’ and vegetables’ coloration. Wright captures a rainbow of colors in foods ranging from heaps of apples to carrots plucked freshly from the earth. Each photograph focuses on the produce against a stark white background, a way to display the food’s vibrant shades without distraction.

The Seattle-based photographer is fascinated by capturing the aging process of vegetable and fruits, displaying the variety of forms each piece takes during ripening and decay. Wright even includes fruit harvested from her own backyard, photographing raspberries both plump and shriveled.

Wright’s client list is diverse, including brands Dry Soda and Samsung as well as (appropriately) several farms. You can see more colorful gradients and food-based imagery on Wright’s Instagram. (via Junk Culture)

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Artist Paints Common Foods to Disguise them as Other Foods

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In this fun series of painted objects titled “It’s not what it seems” by artist Hikaru Cho, common foods are transformed with deftly applied acrylic paints to look like other foods. A banana is turned into a near photo-realistic cucumber, a tomato becomes a tangerine, and even an egg is made into a glistening eggplant. These are actually some of Cho’s “tamer” artworks, as she’s used these same skills with a paintbrush to alter human faces and body parts by adding extra eyes, zippers and mouths. (via Visual News)

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Citrus Fest by Emily Blincoe

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Love this new photo from Emily Blincoe whose work you might recognize from her color coded candy arrangements. You can find more of her work over on Flickr.

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Back to Light: Artist Caleb Charland Uses Fruit Batteries to Illuminate Long-Exposure Photographs

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Fruit Battery Solar System, 2014

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Battery with Hanging Apples, 2013

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Limes and Lemons, 2013

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Electricity From a Ring of Apples, 2013

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Vinegar Batteries with Glassware and Shelf, 2013

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Grapefruit and Pomelo Battery, 2013

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Apple Lamp, 2014

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Apple Tree with Chandelier, Nettie Fox Farm, Newburgh, Maine 2013

Artist Caleb Charland (previously here and here) just unveiled several new images from his Back to Light series, where the artist uses nails inside fruit connected with copper wire to create functional batteries. Harnessed to a small lightbulb, the current is sufficient enough to provide illumination for long exposure photographs. Effectively, the organic batteries create enough voltage to light their own portrait. Charland says about Back to Light:

My current body of work, Back to Light, expands upon a classic grade school science project, the potato battery. By inserting a galvanized nail into one side of a potato and a copper wire in the other side a small electrical current is generated. The utter simplicity of this electrical phenomenon is endlessly fascinating for me. Many people have had the experience of drawing power from fruit in the classroom, and it never ceases to bring a smile to the face or a thought to the mind. This work speaks to a common curiosity we all have for how the world works as well as a global concern for the future of earth’s energy sources. […] My hope is that these photographs function as micro utopias by suggesting and illustrating the endless possibilities of alternative and sustainable energy production. The cycle that begins with the light of our closest star implanting organic materials with nutrients and energy, is re-routed in these images, Back to Light, illuminating earth once again.

Charland is currently focusing on his work full-time from a studio in Bangor, Maine, where he created another body of work titled Artifacts of Fire and Wax.

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Graft Tableware: Biodegradable Utensils that Look Like Vegetables

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For her diploma project at the École cantonale d’art de Lausanne in Switzerland, product designer Qiyun Deng created a beautiful set of utensils and and serving bowls made from bioplastic PLA, a material most often derived from vegetable fats, oils, or starches. Titled Graft, the delicately crafted design of each piece serves as a reminder of the biodegradable materials used to create them: a celery stem becomes a handle for a fork, a stalk of fennel becomes a knife, a slender carrot a spoon.

While Graft is just a concept at this point, I imagine these could sell extraordinarily well given the right price. But could you actually bring yourself to toss such a beautifully designed object in the compost bin? Learn more over on Deng’s website. (via THEmag)

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A Colorful Winter: Organized Fruits and Vegetables Photographed by Florent Tanet

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A Colorful Winter is a new series of works by photographer Florent Tanet currently on display at the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris through February 16th. The clever arrangements of common fruits and vegetables against pastel backdrops play with color, scale, and shape creating whimsical still lifes meant to act as a reprieve from a dreary winter. If you liked this also check out the work of Sarah Illenberger or Sakir Gökçebag. Also don’t miss Carl and Evelina’s Homage to Calder. You can see much more Tanet’s work on his website. (via ignant)

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