Tag Archives: fruit

New Elaborate Patterns and Designs Carved on Produce by ‘Gaku’ 

Although we first mentioned his work here only a month ago, food artist Gaku has continues to share numerous examples of his inventive approach to food carving called mukimono. Gaku works with little more than an x-acto knife to carve quickly before the fruit or vegetable starts to change color, executing motifs and patterns often found in Japanese art. You can see even more of his latest works on Instagram.

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Next-Level Food Carving on Fruits and Vegetables by ‘Gaku’ 

Japan has a rich tradition of food carving called mukimono. If you’ve ever eaten at a fancy restaurant in Japan you might have found a carrot carved into a bunny, garnishing your plate. But in the hands of Japanese artist Gaku, the art of fruit and vegetable carving is elevated to a new realm of edible creations.

One constraint to carving fruits and vegetables is that sometimes you must work fast. The moment a peel is removed, oxidization will start to discolor your artwork. So, depending on the variety, Gaku’s carvings are probably created within several minutes. Armed with a tool similar to an x-acto knife and a fruit or vegetable from the grocery store, Gaku carves intricate patterns that are often inspired by traditional Japanese motifs.

Gaku points out that the banana is great fruit to practice with because it’s cheap and easy to carve. When asked what he does with all his creations after he’s done, his reply is simple: he eats them. “Except for the banana peel.”

You can see more of Gaku’s creations on his Instagram account. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Knit Fruits and Veggies by ‘MapleApple’ Look Good Enough to Eat 

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Latvia-based MapleApple, a mother and daughter duo, knit a bountiful harvest of produce solely from wool and acrylic yarn. The faithful recreations of turnips, carrots, lemons, and leeks are available as individual pieces or sold together as large sets. All pieces are child-safe and you can see much more in their shop.

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The Mystical Origins of Fruit and Vegetables Photographed by Maciek Jasik 

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Although it’s recommended we eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables daily, many are unaware of the origins, mythology, and symbolism many of our favorite healthy foods hold. Several of the most common vegetables took thousands of years to cultivate, the watermelon was originally known for being bland and buried with pharaohs as a water source in the afterlife, and Buddha considered the pomegranate one of the three most blessed fruits.

Photographer Maciek Jasik is fascinated by the tales behind fruits and vegetables and seeks to reintroduce these mystical qualities back into their being through his eerie depictions of squash, pineapples, horned melons, and others. “The Secret Lives of Fruits and Vegetables” aims to bring back the characteristics “that have been lost amidst the clamor of nutritional statistics,” says Jasik. “Each offers its own indelible powers beyond our narrow habits of thought.”

Jasik achieves this by his use of color and deeply-hued smoke bombs, poking small holes within his subjects to make the smoke subtly waft or flood from the inside. Not sticking to a particular color scheme, the images all convey vastly different moods, an eggplant appearing to be involved in a dark alchemical experiment as the pineapple looks like it is straight from an upbeat advertising shoot.

You can see more vegetative smoke-filled photographs from the NYC-based photographer on his Tumblr and Instagram.

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