Tag Archives: geometric

Geometric Light Installations by Nicolas Rivals Bathe the Spanish Countryside in Red 

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As part of his project La Línea Roja, Paris-based photographer Nicolas Rivals constructed bright red light configurations installed outdoors while on a trip through Spain. Each temporary piece was captured in a series of long-exposure shots that reveal an unusual juxtaposition between fabricated objects and the natural world. You can see more from the series on his website and Instagram—and if you liked this also check out James Nizam, Barry Underwood, and this short film from 3hund.

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La Linea Roja

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La Linea Roja

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Geometric Watercolors by Artist Jacob Van Loon 

Recent Colorado transplant Jacob van Loon creates geometric watercolors that seem to visually reference abstract architectural renderings. The colors in his works look as if they have bled beyond recognition of a specific site or landmark, yet still retain a strict set of dense and chaotic lines. The paintings trap specific colors in the boxes of their grid-like surface, yet also allow some to traverse throughout the work, alternating between clean and hazy sections of muted blues and bright oranges.

“By the time I have a final sketch, the layers of primer are caked up and full of valleys and ridges created by broad brush strokes,” van Loon told The Creator’s Project. “When I’m ready for color, it’s not just about pragmatically filling in the spaces, it’s about putting paint down, letting it travel in the valleys and ridges, and seeing where and how it all comes to rest.”

Last year van Loon was commissioned by the band Explosions in the Sky and Temporary Residence Ltd to create the cover art for their album The Wilderness. A video of the making of the work titled 8th and Main can be see above, and final images of the work below. Van Loon’s work will be included in the upcoming group exhibition “How High” at Left Field in San Luis Obispo, CA, and you can see more of his gridded watercolor works on his Instagram and Behance.

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“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

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“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

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“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

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“Pershing” (2014), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 32″x48″

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“Pershing” (2014), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 32″x48″

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“Haish” (2015), watercolor and graphite on wood, 22″x30″

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“Haish” (2015), watercolor and graphite on wood, 22″x30″

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New Laser-Cut Wood Relief Sculptures by Gabriel Schama 

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Oakland-based artist Gabriel Schama (previously) continues to produce intricate relief sculptures by layering pieces of laser-cut mahogany plywood. Some of his most impressive new works see mandala-like shapes contained within the silhouettes of people’s faces, a striking idea that imbues each portrait with an unusual sense of motion and personality. Other pieces seem to utilize religious iconography or patterns from nature like reptile scales or leaves. Schama is soon to release a new collection of work for sale and you can learn more via his website.

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Geometric Sculptures Produced From the Immateriality of Light by James Nizam 

“Octagram” (2016), 22 aluminum coated mirrors, 22 mirror mounts, programmable lighting elements, haze machine, zero-reflectance-paint, dimensions variable, all images courtesy of James Nizam

James Nizam produces subtle, geometric light installations with programmable lighting elements and mirrors, the resulting pieces looking like snapshots of a strictly choreographed laser light show. In his 2011 series “Thought Forms,” Nizam gained entrance to a domestic structure to install several interventions with daylight entering a darkened room. Through the use of mirrors, he created the complex forms below, resulting in tetrahedrons, stacked triangles, and intersecting rectangles.

Recently, Nizam has added color and moved his light sculptures outdoors, casting a blue triangle of light against a city at night in Visible Horizon and forming a blue and pink 16-sided form in Octagram. No matter the location, Nizam’s pieces give a visually physical presence to the immateriality of light, building forms from literal smoke and mirrors.

Nizam’s work will be featured in the upcoming group exhibition “Lumens,” at the Musée régional de Rimouski in Québec from June 12 through September 25, 2016. (via Booooooom)

“Visible Horizon” (2015), lightjet print, print dimensions variable

“3 Movements Inscribing an Octagram” (2016), lightjet print, each 40 x 50 inches

“Nested Polyhedra” (2014), archival pigment print, print dimensions variable

“Thought Form (Icosahedron)” (2014), archival pigment print, 60 x 48 inches

“Thought Form (Fold)” (2011), archival pigment print, print dimensions variable

“Thought Form (Fan)” (2011), archival pigment print, print dimensions variable

“Thought Form (Dart)” (2011), archival pigment print, print dimensions variable

“Thought Form (Tetrahedron)” (2011), archival pigment print, print dimensions variable

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Okuda San Miguel Wraps a Moroccan Church in a Vibrant Geometric Mural 

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All images courtesy of Ink and Movement

After covering a church turned skatepark in Spain with his signature style of murals, Okuda San Miguel (previously) has now transformed an abandoned Moroccan church into a 360-degree mural titled “11 Mirages to Freedom.” The street artist covered the structure in geometric bears, birds, and human faces, produced as a part of the British Council‘s Street Art Caravane Initiative. Working with the architecture already in place, San Miguel painted each of the building’s eleven faces while incorporating the structure’s barred windows. These he formed into bird cages, hats, and masks that are seamlessly incorporated…as long as you don’t look into the barred openings.

The church is uniformly painted in a brilliant shade of yellow, with smaller architectural details painted in equally vibrant colors. You can see more of San Miguel’s murals in the video Infinite World included below, as well as on the artist’s Instagram. (via Web Urbanist)

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New Spray Painted Tile Floor Patterns in Abandoned Spaces by Javier De Riba 

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Instead of competing with giant graffiti tags or wall murals, Spanish artist Javier De Riba (previously) takes an entirely different approach with his spray painted street art. Utilizing carefully overlapped stencil sets, Riba creates pristine sections of tile floor patterns in the midst of cracked sidewalks or on the floors of abandoned buildings. His measured use of color, original geometric arrangements, and precise execution makes every artwork stand out, no matter how mundane the location.

Riba has also begun working with wood varnish to create similar geometric shapes and produced limited edition spray prints of his most recognizable patterns. You can follow his work on Facebook and on Behance.

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