Tag Archives: gifs

Edison’s Cradle? A Kinetic Toy Reinvented with Light 

As part of his senior thesis exhibition at Musashino Art University in Tokyo, art student Yasutoki Kariya re-imagined the ubiquitous desktop gadget, Newton’s Cradle, using a lovely sequence of light bulbs. Entitled Asobi (which translates roughly as “playing“) the 11-bulb installation creates a visual interpretation of the popular toy named after Sir Isaac Newton demonstrating his third law of motion regarding momentum: that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. However, instead of actual energy created by the kinetic force of steel balls, Kariya devised a method for using programmed light and two surreptitiously placed pistons to create this purely visual experience that’s arguably more mesmerizing than the original concept.

As an added super bonus, the team over at the Experiments in Motion blog created the animation above which easily contends for one of the most beautiful animated gifs I’ve ever seen, already racking up over 167,000 shares on Tumblr this weekend.

Asobi was nominated for the 2012 Mitsubishi Junior Designer Award. (via spoon & tamago)

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Incredible Vertigo-Inducing Animations of San Francisco 

This post contains a number of extremely large animated GIFs which might taken a moment to fully download. Sorry for any inconvenience.

Director Kevin Parry (previously) recently directed a wonderful music video for Kalle Matson, shot by Andrea Nesbitt, featuring a number of visual special effects that appear to slingshot the camera through wide views of San Francisco. Parry has a full gallery of smaller animations where you can see some of the isolated shots, but I had him export seven large, absolutely bandwidth-sucking versions, five of which are above. For two more, see also Ocean Bay Bridge and Market Street. Regarding how this was all accomplished he says via email:

The zooms are done by setting up a camera at each end location and filming the camera zooming in and out. The middle parts are done by putting a camera on the front of my scooter and driving the spanning distance. All that footage is then animated after the fact, only using a very small amount of the frames that were actually filmed. And everything is lined up, cropped, etc. to fit my needs. The spins are done by carefully mapping out a circle around whatever target, and picking roughly 36 locations to shoot a still from. Those photos are then processed, and lined up after the fact.

You might remember Kevin’s video from a few months ago, A Stop Motion History of the World. Again, sorry for dumping these giant images in your RSS reader, but worth it, right?

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Experimental Animated GIFs by RRRRRRRROLL 

Wow these are great! Back in May a couple of friends in Japan started a new project called rrrrrrrroll, using photography to explore beautifully minimalist animations based on objects and people turning on a single axis. According to twitter the group makes roughly two animations a week (there’s 34 already), so it’s probably worth your time to tune in. If you liked these, also check out Stellar by Ignacio Torres. (via ignant)

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A Hand-Painted Typographic Experiment by Tien-Min Liao 

Handmade Type is a typographic experiment by designer Tien-Min Liao wherein shapes painted on her hands are transformed by gestures to create letterforms. However she gave herself a unique constraint: the painted figures on her hands for each individual letter had to be utilized for all variations of the letter, both upper and lowercase and sometimes even italic and handwritten. See more examples and the full alphabet over on Behance.

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Kinetic Rings Mimic the Flight of Birds 



Kansas-based metalsmith and jeweler Dukno Yoon creates rings, bracelets, and other devices that mimic the movements of birds by harnessing the motion caused by the flick of the wrist or flexing of fingers. Yoon received his BFA from Kookmin University, Seoul and a MFA from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio and most recently has been working on a series of metronomes that also explore the movement of birds. Though I was only able to embed a few of the animated examples of his work above, head over to his Wings gallery to see many more devices in action, the bracelets in particular are really fun to watch. If you like the kinetic nature of these pieces also check out the work of Gary Schott.

The animated GIFs above are pretty large and might take a moment to load if you’re on a slower connection. We’ll see how the bandwidth does for this post and I’ll do my best to keep them up.

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