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Art

New Glowing Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood are Activated by Sunlight

June 20, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

British artist Chris Wood (previously) continues to create sculptural dichroic glass installations. The artist forms seemingly spare geometric shapes in windows and on on white panels, which come to life with streaks of color when hit with sunlight. You can see more of Wood’s work, including large scale installations and commissions, on her website and Instagram. She’ll also be opening her studio for Cambridge Open Studios in July, 2018.

 

 



Art

Glass Beaded Sculptures by Valérie Rey Bring a Luminous New Dimension to Discarded Wood

June 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Gelée Royale" (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

“Gelée Royale” (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

Costa Rica-based artist Valérie Rey combines fallen segments of branches and logs with glass beads to bring a luminous new life to found natural forms. Innumerable glass baubles in colors of orange, gold, green, and black either completely encrust the found material or are sprinkled over its exterior, imitating a natural appearance similar to a cracked geode. ​You can see more of her nature-inspired sculptures on her website and Instagram.

Detail of "Gelée Royale" (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

Detail of “Gelée Royale” (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

"Effervescence" (2016), Wood and glass, 14 x 12 x 9 inches

“Effervescence” (2016), Wood and glass, 14 x 12 x 9 inches

Cervelle de Moineau (2017), Glass, 13 x 7 x 7 inches

“Supernova”

“In The Sky With Diamonds” (2017), Wood and glass, 6 x 6 x 14 inches

“Après la Pluie”

Detail of “Après la Pluie”

“Angel Virus” (2015), Wood and glass, : 18 x 9 x 9 inches

"Black Rainbow" (2017), Wood and glass, 8 x 8 x 5 inches

“Black Rainbow” (2017), Wood and glass, 8 x 8 x 5 inches

“E2” (2017), Wood and glass, 7 x 7 x 7 inches

 

 



Art

Incredibly Intricate Glasswork by Janis Miltenberger is Inspired by Mythology

June 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Cynara’s Lush Gift, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, bee created by Wesley Fleming, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D. All images used with permission of the artist.

Glass artist Janis Miltenberger draws on the roles of mythology and storytelling as attempts to explain our experience of the world to build complex glass sculptures. Her work often takes the shape of recognizable objects, like human figures and chairs, which are then filled with incredible detail. The artist uses borosilicate glass, and enhanced with glass colors, gold luster, sandblasting, and oil paint. 

Miltenberger shares with Colossal that she was originally drawn to ceramics, and discovered glassblowing in college, where she apprenticed with Richard Marquis. Many years later, she was introduced to lampworking, which is her preferred technique today. She explains, “working alone with a torch was more personal and I don’t think I was quite as aware at that point how I needed that space set apart to focus and identify my ideas and voice.”

The artist’s most recent series, “Doctrine of Signatures,” is based on The Signature of All Things, a 17th century book by Jakob Boehme which detailed the commonly-held belief that the outward appearance of a plant reflected its medicinal value. She is currently working on a large installation that moves away from her decorative style. In fall 2018, Miltenberger will be teaching in Niijima, Japan, and her work will be shown at the Bellevue Art Museum in Washington state. (via Lustik)

Cynara’s Lush Gift (detail), Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, bee created by Wesley Fleming, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D

Golden Memory, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D

Golden Memory (detail), Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D

Doctrine of Signatures, Photographer Lynn Thompson, 38″H x 14″W x 13″D

Doctrine of Signatures (detail), Photographer Lynn Thompson, 38″H x 14″W x 13″D

Golden Tinged Hope, Photographer Lynn Thompson, 84”H x 24”L x 13”D

Golden Tinged Hope (detail), Photographer Lynn Thompson, 84”H x 24”L x 13”D

Dividing Line, wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 34”H x 16”L x 4.5”D

Dividing Line (detail), wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 34”H x 16”L x 4.5”D

Quiet Breath, wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 30″H x 20″L x 4.5″D

Quiet Breath (detail), wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 30″H x 20″L x 4.5″D

Quiet Breath (detail), wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 30″H x 20″L x 4.5″D

 

 



Art

Metal Utensils Precisely Embedded in Vintage Canning Jars by Jennifer Halvorson

June 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Detail of "Waste not want not," Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of “Waste not want not,” Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Glass artist Jennifer Halvorson manipulates vintage canning jars into sculptural portraits tied to memories of making fruit preserves with her family. The antique vessels are each imbedded with utensils that fit perfectly into indentations pressed into the side of the glass objects, and placed in arrangements that connect to her personal narrative.

To create the works, Halvorson slowly warms the jars and then attaches them to a metal rod. After raising the temperature of the pieces, she then carefully torches one area and delicately presses a metal knife, spoon, or fork into the soft interior. “The result of the transformation allows the cutlery to fit perfectly into the jar, showing an active presence within the nostalgic object, but with the absence of a person,” she tells Colossal.

Halvorson has begun to make her own glass jars through rubber molds, wax molding, metal casting, and hot glass blowing molds for her series Preserve Words. Five pieces from this series will be included in the group exhibition Reflections at Momentum Gallery in Asheville, North Carolina from July 1 to August 25, 2018. You can see more of Halvorson’s glass interventions and sculptures on her website.

"Waste not want not," Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“Waste not want not,” Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"What's good for the goose is good for the gander," Jelly jars, cutlery, dried flowers, wood frame, 22.5 x 29 x 4 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“What’s good for the goose is good for the gander,” Jelly jars, cutlery, dried flowers, wood frame, 22.5 x 29 x 4 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"Perfect Influence," Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Perfect Influence,” Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of "Perfect Influence," Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of “Perfect Influence,” Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"From small beginnings come great things," Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“From small beginnings come great things,” Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of "From small beginnings come great things," Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of “From small beginnings come great things,” Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"Genuine Relation," Blown glass, cast bronze, found objects, 6.5 x 10.5 x 6.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Genuine Relation,” Blown glass, cast bronze, found objects, 6.5 x 10.5 x 6.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"Supreme Endeavor," Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Supreme Endeavor,” Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of "Supreme Endeavor," Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of “Supreme Endeavor,” Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"Good Luck Impulse," Blown glass, cast iron, found objects, 9 x 4 x 4.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Good Luck Impulse,” Blown glass, cast iron, found objects, 9 x 4 x 4.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

 

 



Art

Not a Petting Zoo: Fish, Dogs, and Monkeys Comprised of Shimmering Glass Shards

June 4, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All images courtesy of Berengo Studio

Polish artist Marta Klonowska (previously) continues her unique sculptural technique of using thousands of shards of glass to form colorful animals. Many works are based on animals found in paintings from the past, and the artist often situates her sculptures in proximity to the inspiring artworks. Klonowska resides in Warsaw and is represented by Berengo Studio in Venice and Lorch+Seidel Contemporary in Berlin.

Photo credit: Peter Cox. Still Life With Flowers, Fruits and a Dog, After Abraham Van Strij, 2016, Glass

Photo credit: Peter Cox. Still Life With Flowers, Fruits and a Dog, After Abraham Van Strij, 2016, Glass

Photo credit: Francesco Allegretto. The Fish, 2013

Photo credit: Francesco Allegretto. The Fish (detail), 2013

Photo credit: Francesco Allegretto

 

 



Food Photography

New Distorted Photographs by Suzanne Saroff Capture Skewed Perspectives of Food and Plants

June 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Suzanne Saroff (previously) continues her Perspective series, using water and glass to warp the appearance of vibrantly colored dragon fruits, lobsters, cabbages and other flora and fauna. You can see more of her striking images including the still life series titled Shadows, on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Design

Luscious Handmade Glass Orchids by Laura Hart Reflect Plants’ Exotic Beauty

May 17, 2018

Anna Marks

Glass Miltonia Orchid

Colorful orchids, identical in size, bloom in UK artist Laura Hart’s studio. From their bilateral symmetry to their splashes of pigment, the glass designer’s perfectly crafted forms illustrate the strange exotic beauty of the plant species. With their soft and fleshy glass petals, Hart’s botanical sculptures appear as fully bloomed flower heads, each of which has a different pattern to reflect the diversity of the species. “My fascination with orchids spans decades and at one point I had nearly seventy in my conservatory,” Hart tells Colossal. “The explosion of color and perfume during the flowering months intoxicate the senses.”

Hart’s route to making glass sculptures has been a convoluted path alongside many creative pursuits. “Beginning with oils and canvas at around the age of twelve, treading the boards at seventeen, video production in my twenties and thirties, heritage building renovation, 3D animation design in my forties, and, at last, the glorious world of glass in my fifties,” she says.

Hart was unexpectedly brought to glass when asked to design a sculpture in steel and glass for a concept artist, and hasn’t looked back since. “I needed to better understand the glass making process in order to achieve the design, so I observed some wonderfully talented glass artists at work. I was utterly captivated and there the obsession began.”

Glass Phalaenopsis Orchid

Each flower is about twelve inches (thirty cm) in diamteter, and takes Hart up to ten days to make. She tries to recreate the species as faithfully and authentically as possible, whilst imbuing them with her artistic interpretation.

The artist creates orchid-shaped moulds using 3D modeling and animation software. “The templates for each flower are animated into shapes to simulate glass flow within the kiln to ensure that every flower will slump into the correct shape without stressing the glass in the process,” Hart explains.

Glass Fuciflora Bee Orchid

Hart then cuts each petal individually and uses glass powders and frits for the first firing. “Veining is then applied from hair fine strands of glass created by pulling thin shards of glass through a flame.  There can be as many as six firing processes to achieve the final result. The flowers are then sandblasted to create a satin sheen, and coated with a waterproof spray to bring out the color and prevent finger marks.”

The three-dimensional details in Hart’s glass orchids are added from cutting sheet glass which are applied to the petals and re-fired. “Once all the detail and color is applied to each petal they are fused together to create the flat flower shape. Finally, the flower is placed on the mould and fired to slump position.”

To view more of Hart’s delicate floral sculptures visit her website, Facebook, and Twitter.

Glass Caulocattleya ‘Chantilly Lace’ Orchid

Glass Ballerina Orchid

Glass Oncidium Orchid

Glass Phalanopsis Lindenii Orchid

Glass Thelymitra Pulcherrima Orchid

Glass Vanda Loki Orchid

Glass Phalaenopsis (moth) Orchid