Tag Archives: glass

A Stained Glass Cabin Hidden in the Woods by Neile Cooper 

Stained glass artist and jeweler Neile Cooper had a vision for a sanctuary: a small cabin behind her home in Mohawk, New Jersey that would feature her glass designs on every available surface. The result is Glass Cabin, a structure built almost entirely from repurposed window frames and lumber that features dozens of panels of her stained glass work, depicting flowers, birds, butterflies, mushrooms and other scenes from nature. Cooper explores many of these same motifs in her popular jewelry designs. You can see more photos of Glass Cabin on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood Reflect Light in a Rainbow of Color 

Cambridge-based artist Chris Wood (previously) continues to produce stunning light sculptures utilizing panels of dichroic glass that refract light in a vivid array of color. Her works have appeared in numerous exhibitions over the last few years and have even been incorporated into nearly a dozen displays worldwide for Fendi Fashion House. Wood has also created installations using glasses and lights that reflect patterns onto nearby surfaces. Seen here are several pieces from shows at the Shanghai Museum of Glass and the China Art Museum, you can see more recent work on her website.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Paper Cities Enclosed in Glass Vessels by Ayumi Shibata 

Japanese artist Ayumi Shibata uses traditional methods of Japanese paper cutting to create miniature cities within vessels of glass. Her chosen materials reference the delicate relationship humans have with our environment and natural forces of our world, while also relating to the Japanese translation of “paper.” In Japanese, the word for “paper” is “Kami,” which can also mean “god,” “divinity,” or “spirit.” Kami are omnipresent in the Shinto religion, and reside in the sky, ground, trees, and rocks.

“Kami move freely beyond time, universe and places, appearing during events, as well as in our houses and our bodies,” said Shibata on her website. “These spirits also dwell in paper. In the religion of Shinto, white paper is considered a sacred material.”

Using this charged material, Shibata attempts to construct a sculptural dialogue about how we relate and respond to our natural world. Some of Shibata’s work is included in the three-person exhibition Passion Paper at Galerie Atalier Du Genie in Paris through March 27, 2017. (thnx Laura!)

    

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Glass Insects and Plants Sculpted to Scale by Japanese Artist Yuki Tsunoda 

Molding tiny bits of soft Moretti glass with equally small tools, Japanese sculptor Yuki Tsunoda produces insects, flowers, and other types of plants at a size that is nearly to scale. Her subject matter is sparked by her interest to dissuade gut feelings of disgust when it comes to insects, and create works that highlight the beauty of their individual parts.

In addition to Moretti glass, Tsunoda achieves the metallic luminosity often found on insects’ wings and other parts of the body by incorporating dichroic glass and a form of quartz known as aventurine. You can view more of the 26-year-old artist’s miniature bugs and other scale glass works on her Twitter, or purchase one for yourself by going to her online shop. (via Spoon&Tamago)

  

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Oil Paintings of Eyes and Mouths on Glass by Henrik Uldalen 

As part of this ongoing series, self-taught painter Henrik Uldalen has been creating depictions of eyes and mouths on glass. The oil paintings are an extension of his focus on classic figurative painting where he explores “the dark sides of life, nihilism, existentialism, longing and loneliness, juxtaposed with fragile beauty.” Uldalen regularly shares his progress on Instagram and a few of these works are available in his shop.
(via My Amy Goes to 11, Juxtapoz)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Artist Walead Beshty Shipped Glass Boxes Inside FedEx Boxes to Produce Shattered Sculptures 

FedEx® Large Box ©2005 FEDEX 139751 REV 10/05 SSCC, Priority Overnight, Los Angeles-New York trk#795506878000, November 27-28, 2007

In this intriguing sculptural series spanning 2005 to 2014, LA-based artist Walead Beshty packaged his artworks in FedEx boxes and shipped them across the country to exhibitions and galleries. But unlike most artists who utilize every bit of care to protect and pad their artwork from the inevitable rough handling of mail carriers, Beshty designed his pieces to break. For his famous FedEx works he constructed laminate glass objects that fit seamlessly within the dimensions of standard size shipping boxes. Through the “normal” handling the objects would inevitably crack and shatter and it was up to curators and gallerists to carefully remove each piece for display. The fragile volumes were then given titles that specifically mention the date, tracking number, and box size of shipment.

Not only was Beshty fascinated by obtaining a “fingerprint” of sorts that documented the journey of each package to its destination, but he also found it curious that a corporation has the ability to copyright the exact dimensions of a box, essentially owning an empty shape. He shares in a 2011 interview with Mikkel Carl:

The FedEx works […] initially interested me because they’re defined by a corporate entity in legal terms. There’s a copyright designating the design of each FedEx box, but there’s also the corporate ownership over that very shape. It’s a proprietary volume of space, distinct from the design of the box, which is identified through what’s called a SSCC #, a Serial Shipping Container Code. I considered this volume as my starting point; the
perversity of a corporation owning a shape—not just the design of the object—and
also the fact that the volume is actually separate from the box. They’re owned
independently from one another.

Furthermore, I was interested in how art objects acquire meaning through their context and through travel, what Buren called, something like, “the unbearable compromise of the portable work of art”. So, I wanted to make a work that was specifically organized around its traffic, becoming materially manifest through its movement from one place to another.

Here’s a brief video of Beshty explaining the project during the 2008 Whitney Biennial. (via BoingBoing)

Fedex, 2005.

Image courtesy Arts on 5

FedEx boxes (various), 2008. Installation view, Signs of the Time, The Whitney Museum of American Art.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 1 of 131234...»