Tag Archives: glass

Layered Glass Sculptures Mimic the Everyday Drama of the Natural World

White Water

White Water, all images provided by K. William LeQuier

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Plume

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Medusa

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Euphoria

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Curl No. 5

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Cabriole

Glass artist K. William LeQuier‘s glass work is inspired by the drama of the natural world and its everyday events. His sculptures reflect this inspiration by mimicking the natural movements of the sea and its creatures. Each sculpture is held steady by a simple black armature, a hint to the artist’s hand involved in the creation of each glass sculpture.

After years of blowing glass vessels LeQuier moved to the sandblasting process where he learned he could generate textures similar to natural erosion. In addition to forming works that appear as waves, he creates work reminiscent of sea urchins, sponges, and anemones. Most interesting about the sculptures are their layered composition, a complexity that could easily be looked over due to the high level of skill apparent in each sea-themed object.

Currently LeQuier lives and works in Vermont with his wife Mary Angus. His work can be found in the permanent collections of museums across the country including (but not limited to) the American Glass Museum, Indianapolis Art Museum, National Liberty Museum, and Philadelphia Museum of Art. (via My Modern Met)

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Secrets of the Sun: Artist Peter Erskine Transforms Interior Spaces with Laser-Cut Prism Installations

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“New Light on Rome 2000″. Aula of Trajan’s Markets, Rome 112 AD, in spectrum sunlight. Materials: sunlight, laser cut prisms.

In the late 1980s American artist Peter Erskine began to incorporate sunlight into his artistic practice through the use of strategically placed laser-cut prisms in both modern and historical sites. A hybrid of both art and architecture, he explores the way light falls on varying surfaces and brings new meaning to existing places. Erskine says the intent of his light installations is to use “the emotional impact of art to address the full range of nature from its most elemental expression as pure light to its most complex expression as global ecology.” You can explore more of his work with light over the last 30 years on his website. (via Arpeggia)

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“New Light on Rome 2000″. Spectrum sunlight on Aula stairs. Trajan’s Markets, Rome 112 AD. 21.6.2000 – 1.1.2001. Materials: sunlight, laser cut prisms.

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“New Light on Rome 2000″. Spectrum sunlight on Aula stairs. Trajan’s Markets, Rome 112 AD. 21.6.2000 – 1.1.2001. Materials: sunlight, laser cut prisms.

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“New Light on Rome 2000″. Trajan’s Markets, Rome 112 AD. 21.6.2000 – 1.1.2001. Materials: sunlight, laser cut prisms.

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Kokerei Zollverein, Essen, “Sun Moon and Stars”, Rainbow sundial calendar “Spectrum of Time”, and Solar powered solar art with heliostat “Sunrise”, permanent installations. / Ballymena, N. Ireland. ECOS Environmental Centre. Interior “Rainbow Sundial Calendar”. Opened 8.2000, permanent installation.

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Views inside the artist’s residence

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Artist Niyoko Ikuta Uses Layers of Laminated Sheet Glass to Create Spiraling Geometric Sculptures

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Since the early 1980s Japanese artist Niyoko Ikuta has explored the properties of glass which she uses to make etheral geometric sequences manifested as layered sculptures. One of the leading figures in Japanese glass art, Ikuta’s works have been collected by institutions worldwide including the V&A in London and the Corning Museum of Glass in the U.S. She shares about her work via V&A:

I am captivated by the complexity of light as it reflects, refracts, and passes through broken cross sections of plate glass. In 1980 I began making artwork by laminating sheets of glass using adhesive and exposing the cross sections. My motifs are derived from feelings of gentleness and harshness, fear, limitless expansion experienced through contact with nature, images from music, ethnic conflict, the heart affected by joy and anger, and prayer. In creating my pieces it is like imagining an architectural space when viewing blueprints, deciding on an image by reading into the intentions of the architect, or imbuing a space with dynamic energy to bring it to life.

You can explore more of her work at Yufuku Gallery. (via Art Ruby)

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Crashing Glass Waves Frozen Into Elegant Vessels by Marsha Blaker and Paul DeSomma

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Photo by Paul Schraub

Husband and wife team Paul DeSomma and Marsha Blaker translate their oceanic inspirations directly into their collaborative glass sculptures, frozen glass waves caught mid-crash and appearing to spray surf from the contained vessels. The works exist as seamless gradients, dark blues circling the base while white froth circles the top of the pieces crafted from molten glass.

Although the couple works collaboratively on the vases, they also adhere to individual practices. Blaker focused on the textures and colors found within detailed marine environments while DeSomma’s work emphasizes the clarity and form of colorless and transparent glass.

The couple met at the esteemed Pilchuck Glass School in 1989, marrying shortly after and opening their studio in Live Oak, California in 2001. Together the couple is known internationally for their glass and ceramic work. (via Creative Boom and Amusing Planet)

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Photo by Paul Schraub

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Photo by Paul Schraub

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Photo by Paul Schraub

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Photo courtesy Laughing Dog Gallery

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Photo courtesy Laughing Dog Gallery

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Photo courtesy Laughing Dog Gallery

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Photo by Russell Johnson

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Photo by Russell Johnson

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Custom Glass Planets Containing the Cremated Remains of Loved Ones

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Merry Coor produces ethereal designs from cremated remains within custom glass beads. Coor crafts each bead by hand, first melting glass into a round bead, then spiraling the design out of ashes on top, and finally sealing the design with an outer layer of clear glass. For each bead she not only requests a 1/2 teaspoon of ashes, but also a picture, letter, or story of the deceased so she can develop a personal connection while forming the piece of jewelry.

Coor has been making glass beads for about 15 years, but it wasn’t until last year that she began incorporating ashes into their designs. After this development Coor explained, “My bead making now gave me a new purpose, and a way to honor others, both living and passed.”

Custom beads can be requested by the California-based artist either through her company’s website, Ash Beads, or through her Etsy. (via Laughing Squid, Bored Panda)

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A Glass Table that Appears to be Held Aloft by Helium Balloons

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The UP Balloon Coffee Table designed by Duffy London cleverly creates the illusion of a glass tabletop supported by 11 helium balloons. You might remember Duffy’s wildly popular glass underwater topography map table from last year. The balloons and strings in the UP table are actually made from steel rods and metal resin composite, creating a sturdy base. Duffy plans to make only 25 tables and they’re available in red, gold, and silver balloons. (via Designboom, Laughing Squid)

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New Three-Dimensional Figurative Collages Encased in Multiple Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

The Brooklyn-based artist Dustin Yellin (previously) was commissioned by the New York City Ballet to install a new series of his figurative collages. The artist refers to the sculptures as Psychogeographies because “they feel like maps of the psyche.”

Each large-scale sculpture is individually embellished with bizarre found objects—cut-up books, magazines and trash found on the street—which are then sealed within layers of glass. “Imagine if you were to make a drawing on a window,” said Yellin, explaining his process. “And then you were to take another window and glue it to that window… until you had a window sandwich. I make window sandwiches.”

The resulting forms resemble dancers striking various poses: their multi-dimensional bodies encapsulated in suspended animation. A grand total of 15 of these “window sandwiches,” each weighing in at 3,000 pounds each, were installed in the atrium of the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center. The installation is on view for all performances through March 1, 2015 but there’s also free public viewing through February 22. If you can’t make it you can always follow Yellin’s activities on Instagram.

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

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