glass

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Art

Wearable Glass Objects and Sculptures by Kit Paulson

December 12, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Kit Paulson has a broad interest in art, science, and history that intersects superbly in her career as a glass sculptor. Over the past several years she’s explored human anatomy through a variety of skull and bones pieces, as well as wearable objects like masks, armor, and even a pair of gloves. Paulson is currently finishing an MFA at Southern Illinois University and will be teaching upcoming workshops at Pittsburgh Glass Center, Bildwerk Frauenau, and Pilchuck Glass School. You can follow her most recent work on Instagram. (via Corning Museum of Glass)

 

 



Art Craft

Glass Vases Formed Within Wooden Enclosures by Scott Slagerman Studio

November 27, 2017

Christopher Jobson

To explore the symbiotic relationship between two vastly different materials, LA-based artist Scott Slagerman in a collaboration with Jim Fishman created this elegant Wood & Glass series. Each glass vase is formed by blowing it directly into a shape cut from wood while it lays flat on a table, ensuring the disparate objects fit perfectly like puzzle pieces. For a labor-intensive process that requires a precise dance of speed and movement, the added difficulty of working with a flammable enclosure seems remarkable. From Slagerman’s artist statement:

Scott Slagerman has always been captivated by glass – how it is transformed from a fragile, yet unyielding solid state to molten fluidity and back again; and how this mutable substance, through a process that is both delicate and dangerous, can create objects both essential and esoteric. He is fascinated by the role that glass plays in architecture, as well as in the everyday objects that we find around us.

You can see more from the Glass & Wood series on Slagerman’s website. (via Contemporist)

 

 



Art Food

Decadent Pastries Formed From Porcelain and Glass by Shayna Leib

October 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos by Eric Tadsen

Glass artist Shayna Leib (previously), like anyone, is deeply attracted to the seductive pull of decadent desserts. Unlike most however, Leib is unable to indulge. Her body reacts to several aspects of puffed pastries and chocolate mouses, causing her to have many severe dietary restrictions. It was this void that pulled her towards the desire to work with the unattainable, to recreate the objects she couldn’t eat.

“This body of work started as a therapeutic exercise in deconstruction and a re-training of the mind to look at dessert as form rather than food,” says Leib in an artist statement about her series Patisserie. “It soon became a technical riddle, and I became a food taxidermist of french pastries.”

To create the glossy sculptures she combines elements of porcelain and glass, utilizing nearly every technique for both to achieve the hyperrealistic quality of each faux dessert. Like a typical French pastry would be rolled, glazed, baked, and trimmed, Leib hot-sculpts, fuses, casts, grinds, throws, and even pipes with a theme-appropriate pastry tube. You can view more of her sweet imitations on her website, Instagram, and Facebook.

 

 



Art

Elegant Flameworked Glass Sculptures by Eunsuh Choi

August 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Like a house of cards or a precariously stacked pile of pick-up sticks, it’s a marvel to stare at Eunsuh Choi‘s glass sculptures and wonder how each object doesn’t collapse under its own weight. One of the central themes of her artistic practice—both in metaphor and execution—is the idea of ambition, specifically how an individual is willing to push past barriers and risk failure in the pursuit of success.

“My work specifically focuses on communicating the graceful flow of our emotional tendencies through the plastic medium of flameworked glass,” she shares with Habitat. “I like to work sculpturally, utilizing form and its surrounding atmosphere to portray narratives based on the human encounter with success and failure in the pursuit of personal ambition.”

Choi sculpts primarily through a process called flameworking where thin borosilicate glass rods are heated with a torch and carefully bent to form the lattice-like structures that are stronger than they first appear. You can see more of Choi’s work at Gallery Sklo and Habitat Fine Art.

 

 



Art

Fluid Rocks: Artist Flavie Audi Forms Gem-Like Sculptures from Glass

August 17, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Fluid rock 26 — 2017 glass, fine gold, 25 × 25 × 20 cm

London-based French-Lebanese artist Flavie Audi upends ideas of both geology and glass with her sculptural series, Fluid Rocks. Audi renders blown glass not into rigid, delicate vessels but instead turns the material into colorful translucent blobs with quivering surfaces.

Although she keeps her exact techniques a secret, the artist’s incorporation of fine gold and silver into the glass helps to create the color-shifting translucence. This method, which results in the glass simultaneously displaying completely different transmitted and reflected colors, goes back at least to the 4th century as documented in found Roman glass pieces.

“Works translate the mechanism of life and light and resemble fragments of an ethereal landscape or geology,” Audi writes on her website. “The forms and gestures found in it capture a fleeting, living energy and suggest a certain ambiguity, hovering between digital screen and celestial body.”

You can next see Audi’s work in a group show this October as part of the Arte Sano Biennale at the Museo de Arte Popular in Mexico City. More of her glass work can be found on her website. (via Artsy)

 

 



Art

Dripping Glass Fusion “Jellyfish” Sculptures by Daniela Forti

August 9, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Daniela Forti lives and works in Chianti, Tuscany where she produces these fantastic artworks of dripped glass. She refers to the pieces as “Jellyfish” because of their undulating tentacles that are formed by hand through a melted glass fusion process. Each piece appears to balance like a small platter or table atop colorful, spindly drips that somehow manage to support the weight above. Many examples of her work are on view (and also available) over at Artemest.

 

 



Art

Kinetic Cast Glass Sculptures by Heike Brachlow

August 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

German glass artist Heike Brachlow finds inspiration in architecture and geometry, creating cast glass sculptures that rely heavily on their shape, which is often that of a cylinder or cube. Works in her Theme and Variation series seem to impossibly balance as they subtly curve upwards, individual cubes colored with the same mixture of oxides at increasing amounts. Her pink work, seen below, contains neodymium oxide which causes it to change color in different lights, shifting from a pink to green hue depending on which light the glass sculpture is displayed under.

In addition to having disparate color properties, many of the pieces can be taken apart and rearranged, inviting her audience to create unique stacks of their own, and perhaps mix-up the provided gradient. Other works, like those in her cylindrical Waiting series, are formed in a way that allows the top component to spin effortlessly on its base. Her On Reflection series also has a similar kinetic quality, with twirling glass pieces that appear more like spinning tops than silos.

Brachlow discovered her love for glass while working as a glassblower in a small studio in Rotorua, New Zealand. She received her BA from the University of Wolverhampton and MA and PhD from the Royal College of Art in London and regularly teaches glass blowing classes at the Corning Museum of Glass and other institutions. You can find her work in the collections of the Glasmuseum Hentrich in Dusseldorf, Germany, Glasmuseum alter Hof Herding in Coesfeld, Germany, the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington and more.