Tag Archives: glass

Misshapen Glass Vases by Studio E.O Appear to Melt Atop Angular Stone Platforms 

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All photos by Gustav Almestål for Studio E.O

Indefinite Vases is a recent project by multidisciplinary design practice Studio E.O based in Stockholm. Working with handblown glass and cut stone, traditional vase forms are melted and cooled around sharp edges to create place-specific vessels. From their project statement:

The project is an exploration of the relationship between geometric and organic forms – transparent and opaque. Indefinite melting material interacts with definite angular forms and gravity determines the relationship in between. Indefinite Vases are sculptures or containers. Functional or decorative. The contrast between the cut stone and the form of the hand blown glass emphasizes the relation between space and object, an interplay between a fragile material and its solid counterpart.

At the time of production a limited number of vases were made available through Galerie kreo, and you can see many more photos on Studio E.O’s website. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

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Vintage Pressed Glass Sculptures with a Flourish of Detail by Amber Cowan 

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Sky Blue, Cobalt and Slag, 2014. Flameworked and Fused American Pressed Glass, Steel, mixed media. 33″x39x92014

Artist Amber Cowan works primarily with fragments of vintage pressed glass to construct complex vessels and sculptures with a multitude of fused components. Pressed glass is created when molten glass is forced into a mold as a way to mass-produce certain forms. Cowan uses these found pieces to create remarkable one-of-a-kind objects that reference the rise and fall of US glassware manufacturing, while simultaneously offering a new narrative. You can see more of Cowan’s work on her website, Instagram, and at Heller Gallery. (thnx, Laura!)

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Goddess in the Sky, 2016. Flameworked American pressed glass, mixed media. 26″ x 18″ x 6″

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White Swan Theater, 2013. Flameworked and fused American pressed glass, mixed media. 20″x26″x5.5″

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Sky Blue Cluster, 2015. Flameworked American pressed glass, mixed media. 10 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ x 4 1/2″

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Spring Mint Bowl, 2015. 19″ x 19″ x 4″

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River Green and Mint, 2015. Flameworked American Pressed Glass Cullet, Red Oak, Mixed Media. 17″ x 52″ x 8″

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Prismatic Paintings Produced From Refracted Light by Stephen Knapp 

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Stephen Knapp has been making work that is transformed by light for over thirty years, producing vibrant light installations he refers to as paintings. These large-scale works utilize minimal tools, harnessing simply light and dichroic glass to throw a multitude of colors against the walls and room. The installations are not sketched out beforehand or programmed by computer, but rather created during the installation process as Knapp moves intuitively to choreograph his intricate light patterns.

“The fun of what I do with light, is that there is nothing in our visual memory that prepares us for what I’m doing,” said Knapp in a short film about his work. “The fact that what I create can just be done with light, that there is no paint on these panels, is absolutely astounding to people. What I am trying to do most of all here is challenge any traditional notion of perception. What is it? Is it real? Is it not real? Does it matter?”

These works have been featured in solo exhibitions around the country including the Boise Art Museum, the Chrysler Museum of Art, the Naples Art Museum, the Butler Institute of American Art, and the Flint Institute of Art, among others. Knapp’s solo exhibition Lightpaintings is currently on view through August 27, 2016 at the Pensacola Museum of Art. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Edible Sea Glass Candy Looks Just Like It Washed up on the Beach 

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Jason and Andie from Andie’s Specialty Shop have an incredible skill for making edible treats that look like everyday objects from vintage buttons to chocolate gears or even an entire Scrabble set. One of their most popular treats are bags of mixed candy chunks that look exactly like sea glass, pieces of broken bottles churned by the seashore. I can’t even imagine how they make these oyster shells embedded with chocolate.

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New Miniature Handmade Glass Creatures by ‘Glass Symphony’ 

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Kiev-based glass artist Nikita Drachuk of Glass Symphony (previously) continues to crank out all matter of tiny glass objects from birds and bees to slugs and salamanders. Drachuk primarily uses a technique called lampwork, where a high-temperature torch is used to melt colorful glass rods. You can see more of his work on Etsy.

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Guido Mocafico’s Photographs of the Blaschka’s Exquisite Scientific Glass Models 

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Octopus vulgaris, Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka. Photograph © Guido Mocafico, 2013. With the courtesy of the Natural History Museum of London, UK.

Father and son Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka dedicated their lives to creating some of the most exquisite glass models ever produced by human hands over the course of overlapping careers spanning the mid 1800s through the 1930s. Originally from Bohemia, but based in Dresden, the artists used glassblowing techniques to fabricate near lifelike sculptures of plants and invertebrates including jellyfish, snails, sea anemones, corals, hydroids, starfish, sea-cucumbers, and other creatures.

The Blaschka glass models are made from clear, colored, and painted glass, sometimes assembled with wires. All of the pieces were commissioned by institutions for private research collections and were never sold directly to the public. It’s estimated the father and son made approximately 4,400 individual models during their lifetimes, the majority of which survive today.

Over the last few years photographer Guido Mocafico has set out to document many of the most impressive models created by Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka that are currently stored in museums and universities around the world. Using his own unique style to illuminate each object against a stark black background, Mocafico manages to capture the minute details of each artwork, bringing to life sculptures that are now more than a century old.

A large exhibition of Mocafico’s photos, titled simply Blaschka, are currently on view at Hamiltons Gallery in London through May 24, 2016. You can explore more photos on Artsy. (via Juxtapoz)

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Aulosphaera elegantissima, Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka. Photograph © Guido Mocafico, 2013. With the courtesy of the Natural History Museum of Dublin, Ireland.

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Bougainvillia fruiticosa, Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka. Photograph © Guido Mocafico, 2014. With the courtesy of the University Museum of Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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Carmarina hastata stage 4, Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka. Photograph © Guido Mocafico, 2014. With the courtesy of the University of Vienna, Austria.

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Porpita meditteranea, Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka. Photograph © Guido Mocafico, 2013. With the courtesy of the Natural History Museum of Geneva, Switzerland.

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