Tag Archives: glass

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 45 (2014) | all photos courtesy the artist

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 42 – detail

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 45 (2014) – detail

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 45 (2014) – detail

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 43 (2014)

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 43 (2014) – detail

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 43 (2014) – detail

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Untitled Small Figure 07

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 41 (2013)

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography is the act of exploring an urban environment with an emphasis on curiosity and drifting. Or, more colloquially put, a “toy box full of playful, inventive strategies for exploring cities.” For the Brooklyn-based artist Dustin Yellin, his toy box is full of everything he finds on the street—flowers, leaves, bugs, and even dead rats, which are then composed into three-dimensional collages and sealed behind resin.

In his most recent series “Psychogeographies,” Yellin uses multiple layers of glass, each covered in detailed imagery, to create a single intricate, three-dimensional collage with a mix of magazine cut-outs and acrylic paint. When pressed to describe what he does, Yellin struggles, but not with a lack of words. Here is an excerpt from a mini-essay “concerning the difficulty of saying something about what I do.”

“Is it a copout to say “the work speaks for itself”?
I feel like it is
But I’m also awful talking about what the work is.
So sometimes I say “it speaks for itself”
But what does that even mean?

However, he does offer some advice:

First and foremost, they’re massive see-through blocks
And that’s one way to read them, listen to them “speaking”
As massive see through blocks.
Another is to listen to what’s inside them
The forms, the clippings, the dead things, the painted things,
Frozen between the layers of glass, what I’ve called
The captured and frozen “dynamism” of culture.

You can follow Dustin Yellin on Facebook or Instagram, or read more about him in this NYT article.

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder glass butterflies
Photo by Tom DuBrock

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder glass butterflies
Photo by Tom DuBrock

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder glass butterflies
Photo by Tom DuBrock

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder glass butterflies
Photo by Tom DuBrock

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder glass butterflies
Photo by Tom DuBrock

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder glass butterflies
Photo by Tom DuBrock

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder glass butterflies
Photo by Tom DuBrock

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder glass butterflies
Photo by Tom DuBrock

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder glass butterflies
Photo by Tom DuBrock

Delicate Butterflies Cast in Glass Dust by Michael Crowder glass butterflies
Photo by Tom DuBrock

Currently on view at Wade Wilson Art in Houston, Texas is this spectacular collection of glass butterflies by artist Michael Crowder titled Mariposa Mori. The artist forms the brittle insects using a technique called pâte de verre that involves the fusion of tiny glass particles. The final pieces are then displayed in wood cases with felt lining similar in form to traditional entomology display boxes. For other artworks Crowder has been known to use similar particulate substances like sugar, chocolate, marble dust or cigarette ashes. Via Wade Wilson:

The butterflies are made in a method called pâte de verre, which translates to “paste of glass.” Itself a 19th century French creation, pâte de verre is at its simplest melting glass particles together. The variation on this technique that I have developed is to use very small particles of glass roughly the size of grains of sugar and to heat them to a precisely controlled point where I can melt and fuse the particles together, but still allow them to retain an open crystalline surface texture. The effect is almost impossibly delicate and fragile looking, as a butterfly wing should be.

You can see much more of Crowder’s work on his website. The exhibition runs through October 25th. (via Ex-Chamber)

Unexpected Layers of Glass Added to Stones and Books by Ramon Todo

Unexpected Layers of Glass Added to Stones and Books by Ramon Todo stone sculpture glass books

Unexpected Layers of Glass Added to Stones and Books by Ramon Todo stone sculpture glass books

Unexpected Layers of Glass Added to Stones and Books by Ramon Todo stone sculpture glass books

Unexpected Layers of Glass Added to Stones and Books by Ramon Todo stone sculpture glass books

Unexpected Layers of Glass Added to Stones and Books by Ramon Todo stone sculpture glass books

Unexpected Layers of Glass Added to Stones and Books by Ramon Todo stone sculpture glass books

Unexpected Layers of Glass Added to Stones and Books by Ramon Todo stone sculpture glass books

Unexpected Layers of Glass Added to Stones and Books by Ramon Todo stone sculpture glass books

Unexpected Layers of Glass Added to Stones and Books by Ramon Todo stone sculpture glass books

Born in Tokyo, Dusseldorf-based artist Ramon Todo creates beautiful textural juxtapositions using layers of glass in unexpected places. Starting with various stones, volcanic rock, fragments of the Berlin wall, and even books, the artist inserts perfectly cut glass fragments that seem to slice through the object resulting in segments of translucence where you would least expect it. You can see more of his work over on Art Front Gallery, and here. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia  windows glass architecture

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia  windows glass architecture

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia  windows glass architecture

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia  windows glass architecture

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia  windows glass architecture

For their very first date, photographer Nick Olson took designer Lilah Horwitz on a walk in the mountains of West Virginia. While chatting and getting to know each other during a particularly scenic sunset the two jokingly wondered what it would be like to live in a house where the entire facade was windows, so the sunset would never be contained within a small space. Where most people would file the idea away as a dream or maybe an item at the bottom of a bucket list, the newly minted couple were a bit more aggressive. Less than a year later the two quit their jobs and embarked on a road trip starting in Pennsylvania to collect dozens of windows from garage sales and antique dealers. A few weeks later they arrived in West Virginia and built the glass cabin in the exact same spot where they envisioned it on their fist date.

Filmmakers Matt Glass and Jordan Wayne Long of Half Cut Tea caught up with Horwirz and Olson to learn more about the construction of the building and their unusually strong commitment to following through with their artistic visions.

Prince Rupert’s Drop: The Curious Properties of a Molten Glass Blob Dropped in Cold Water

Prince Ruperts Drop: The Curious Properties of a Molten Glass Blob Dropped in Cold Water science glass

Prince Ruperts Drop: The Curious Properties of a Molten Glass Blob Dropped in Cold Water science glass

Prince Ruperts Drop: The Curious Properties of a Molten Glass Blob Dropped in Cold Water science glass

Prince Ruperts Drop: The Curious Properties of a Molten Glass Blob Dropped in Cold Water science glass

So this is completely amazing. Destin from Smarter Every Day stopped by Orbix Hot Glass in Fort Payne, Alabama to explore a fascinating phenomenon called a Prince Rupert’s Drop. Apparently when molten hot glass is dropped in cold water it forms an object that’s almost completely impervious to brute force, even a sold hammer strike to the center of the teardrop-like shape won’t break the glass. Yet gently cut or even bump the tip of the drop and suddenly the entire thing shatters in an explosive chain reaction traveling at a speed of over 1 mile PER SECOND. Watch the video above to see the effect in 130,000 fps glory. (via the awesomer)

New Neon Skull Sculptures by Eric Franklin

New Neon Skull Sculptures by Eric Franklin sculpture neon light glass anatomy
Skull No. 3 / Flameworked borosilicate glass, ionized neon and mercury, wood, electronics. 14″x14″x14″. 2013.

New Neon Skull Sculptures by Eric Franklin sculpture neon light glass anatomy
Skull No. 3 / Detail.

New Neon Skull Sculptures by Eric Franklin sculpture neon light glass anatomy
Skull No. 3 / Detail.

New Neon Skull Sculptures by Eric Franklin sculpture neon light glass anatomy
Skull No. 1 / Flameworked borosilicate glass, ionized neon, wood, electronics. 14″x14″x14″. 2013.

New Neon Skull Sculptures by Eric Franklin sculpture neon light glass anatomy
Skull No. 1 / Detail.

New Neon Skull Sculptures by Eric Franklin sculpture neon light glass anatomy
Skull No. 1 / Detail.

New Neon Skull Sculptures by Eric Franklin sculpture neon light glass anatomy
Skull No. 2 / Flameworked borosilicate glass, ionized neon and krypton, wood, electronics. 14″x14″x14″. 2013.

New Neon Skull Sculptures by Eric Franklin sculpture neon light glass anatomy
Skull No. 2 / Detail.

New Neon Skull Sculptures by Eric Franklin sculpture neon light glass anatomy
Skull No. 2 / Detail.

Portland artist Eric Franklin (previously) just completed three new works, a trio of neon glass skulls lit internally by ionized neon, krypton, and mercury. The structure of each human skull is deviously complex, made from a network of glass tubes that have to be perfectly sealed to create the vacuum necessary to light them, a process that leaves the figures somewhat misshapen and admittedly a bit creepy. A completely amazing sort of creepy. All three artworks are currently available for acquisition through Chris Forney over at Artworks Gallery. All images courtesy the artist.

Giant Ocean Waves of Wood and Glass by Mario Ceroli

Giant Ocean Waves of Wood and Glass by Mario Ceroli wood waves water sculpture ocean glass

Giant Ocean Waves of Wood and Glass by Mario Ceroli wood waves water sculpture ocean glass

Giant Ocean Waves of Wood and Glass by Mario Ceroli wood waves water sculpture ocean glass

Giant Ocean Waves of Wood and Glass by Mario Ceroli wood waves water sculpture ocean glass

Giant Ocean Waves of Wood and Glass by Mario Ceroli wood waves water sculpture ocean glass

According to the New York Times sculptor Mario Ceroli is one of the least known yet most influential artists of the Italian post-war scene. His work spans over forty years and I encourage you to take a deep dive into his website to explore his wide range of installations and sculptures. Two of his most beautiful works depict crashing waves sculpted from thin layers of precisely cut wood and glass titled La Vague and Maestrale. The energy present in the works is remarkable as if any moment the materials are going to crash into the gallery floor. Also, if you’ve ever been to the Adelaide Botanic Garden in Australia you may have seen a similar piece by sculptor Sergio Redegalli called Cascade. (via connaissance des arts, claudio, and tate_ellen)

Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska

Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals
Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals
Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals

Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals
Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals
Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals
Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals

Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals
Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals

Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals

Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska sculpture glass animals

Using carefully broken shards of colored glass, Polish artist Marta Klonowska assembles translucent animals in life-like proportion and size. Almost all of her sculptures are based on animals found in baroque and romantic paintings by such artists as Peter Paul Rubens or Francisco de Goya next to which they are often displayed. Her work appeared most recently at European Glass Context 2012, and you can see many more images over on lorch + seidel contemporary. (via lustik)

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