Tag Archives: glass

Space Glass: Extraordinary Solar Systems and Flowers Encased in Glass by Satoshi Tomizu 


Glass artist Satoshi Tomizu sculpts small glass spheres that appear to contain entire solar systems and galaxies. Planets made of opals, flecks of real gold, and trails of colored glass seem to spin and loop like twists in the Milky Way. While photographed here in a macro view, the pieces are actually quite small and include a small glass loop so each piece can be turned into a pendant. I can’t help but be reminded of this pivotal scene from the acclaimed Men in Black film.

Tomizu’s glass work recently won a Atelier Nova Design Award and appeared at the Handmade in Japan Festival. You can explore much more of his work in this Facebook gallery and on his website. (via My Modern Met)














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Delicate ‘Knit’ Glass Sculptures by Carol Milne 


Seattle-based artist Carol Milne (previously) fabricates flowing glass sculptures that mimic the delicate patterns of knit yarn. Contrary to the assumption that Milne has super-human ability to knit strands of molten glass by hand, the artist instead devised a somewhat complicated process that involves wax casting, mold-making, and kiln-casting. She discusses her techinques in detail in this video from Heather DiPietro. Milne also offers a PDF and a book about producing her glass work through the FAQ on her website.

Over the last year Milne’s artwork has appeared in the 9th Cheongju International Craft Competition, in the Creative Knitting show at the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, and at the Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts. You can see more of her recent work at Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery in Pittsburgh.










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Exquisite Marine Life Specimens Imagined in Glass by Steffen Dam 

steffan-5All images courtesy Joanna Bird Gallery unless otherwise noted

As a child, Danish artist Steffen Dam loved poring over his grandparents’ collection of scientific books and cabinets of insects. This fascination of how we catalogue and understand the natural world followed through to his artistic glass career, where Dam creates highly detailed “Cabinets of Curiosities” that mimic oceanic specimens suspended in glass jars and plates. The pieces are usually displayed inside light boxes to better illuminate every minute detail from the fragile tentacles of a jellyfish to a flourish of bubbles that seem to dance around many of his specimens.

A quote from David Revere McFadden’s essay Between Art and Nature, The Glass of Steffen Dam:

Steffen Dam invites the viewer to relish the sheer beauty of his “specimens,” but also to reflect on the meaning of nature as a mirror of the human mind and spirit. Dam has “captured” nature in his work, but he assiduously avoids simple imitation of life; the artist shies away from what he refers to as “cheap tricks in glass.” He seeks to strike a “balance between fiction and reality.” While his work is in no way intended to serve as pedagogic tools, as specimens in “cabinets of curiosities” often were, they are intended to engage the eye and stimulate the imagination. Knowledge about the forms, structures, surfaces, and colors of true natural specimens is not to be found in Dam’s displays of crystal cylinders, but another kind of knowledge—that of the visual poetry of endlessly varied forms—is freely offered. Dam’s little creatures, although frozen in glass, remind of how we read and feel both time and change.

Dam most recently had several pieces on view at Chicago’s SOFA Expo through Heller Gallery. You can also see several additional works at Joanna Bird.

Photo by Christopher Jobson for Colossal / SOFA Expo Chicago










Courtesy Heller Gallery

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Optical Float Paintings Suspended in Layers of Glass by Wilfried Grootens 


Artist Wilfried Grootens paints extraordinary figures comprised of dots and tendrils sandwiched between dozens of laminate glass layers. These strangely precise optical float paintings take on the form of some fantastic microscopic creatures and are sometimes reminiscent of the photos depicting the milliseconds before a nuclear explosion. The design of each cube is so precise, the thin layers of paint appear to completely vanish when viewed from a side angle.

At the age of 15 Grootens first apprenticed as a glass painter at the Derix Company in Germany where he learned to restore antique stained glass windows. Four years later he left on a near decade-long adventure to travel the world, play music, and experience the cultures of Asia and South America before eventually returning to his work with glass. In 1988, he received a Master Craftsman’s Diploma in Munich and by the following year had opened his own studio in Kleve.

Grootens will have work at the upcoming SOFA Expo Chicago through Habatat Galleries starting November 5th. (via ARTchung, Baby)

Where the Shark Bubbles Blow, 2012; 9.5 x 8.25 x 8.25 inches; optical float glass. Painted, laminated, polished.


Where the Shark Bubbles Blow 2015 PL 1 / Where the Shark Bubbles Blow E2 2015

Where the Shark Bubbles Blow III, 2013; 9.25 x 8.5 x 8.25 inches; optical float glass. Painted, laminated, polished.





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Handmade Blown Glass Flora and Fauna by ‘Glass Symphony’ 


Ukrainian glass artist Nikita Drachuk of Glass Symphony creates all manner of glass spiders, octopi, and other critters by hand. He uses a method called lampworking, where a lamp or torch is used to melt rods of colored glass. Once in a molten state, the glass can be formed by blowing and shaping with various tools and small movements. You can see more of their delicate glass critters here.










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These ‘Chiseled’ Glass Wave Vessels by Graham Muir Appear Frozen in Motion 


Precariously resting atop a pedestal, these wave-like glass vessels by Scottish artist Graham Muir seem to defy gravity as if frozen in a moment before crashing into the ocean. Using techniques perfected over the last decade, Muir achieves delicate shapes that seem almost chiseled or fractured, but are in fact accomplished when working while the glass is still hot. He shares via his artist statement:

Such work speaks quietly of the harmony between maker or makers and the medium. It is often the result of a path that involves many failed attempts but results in a piece all the stronger for that, where nothing needs neither added nor taken away.

I find glass to be a material that does not respond well to being dominated by the artist. For me the concept of the work is just the starting point for a conversation between the artist’s idea and the material. The artist flags up the idea, the medium responds and the discussion begins. However the material must not dominate proceedings either and hot glass, as most who work in it know, can be very persuasive in having its own way.

Muir most recently had pieces on view as part of an exhibition of Scottish makers through Gallery TEN at Saatchi Gallery during Collect in London earlier this year. You can see more of his waves on his website. (via My Modern Met)







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The Mesmerizing Process of Making a Glass Chandelier from Scratch 




Walking into a hotel ballroom, say, and considering a gigantic glass chandelier suspended from the ceiling, you probably fall into one of two camps: “Wow, that chandelier is totally incredible.” OR “Wow, if that fell from the ceiling it would be totally incredible.” Regardless of which camp you fall into, you’ve probably never considered the process behind creating a genuine glass chandelier from raw materials. Lucky for us, the Science Channel went behind the scenes to film the elaborate glass-working process required to build the fanciest 150-pound lighting mechanism imaginable. Unfortunately this clip fails to credit the studio and artists shown on screen. Anyone know? (via Sploid)

Update: This is a peek inside the Baccarat crystal studio… because it’s written on their shirts. (thnx, Laurent for helping us read words)

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