glass

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Art

Anatomical Neon: Blown Glass Human Organs Containing Neon Lights by Jessica Lloyd-Jones

March 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Anatomical Neon is a series of blown glass lights by North Wales-based artist Jessica Lloyd-Jones meant to focus attention on how energy is used by the human body. Describing the four pieces via her website she says:

Brain Wave conveys neurological processing activity as a kinetic and sensory, physical phenomena through its display of moving electric plasma. Optic Nerve shows a similar effect, more akin to the blood vessels of the eye and with a front ‘lens’ magnifying the movement and the intensity of light. Heart is a representation of the human heart illuminated by still red neon gas. Electric Lungs is a more technically intricate structure with xenon gas spreading through its passage ways, communicating our human unawareness of the trace gases we inhale in our breathable atmosphere.

The pieces were funded in part by awards from Arts Council Wales and Wales Arts International and executed at Urban Glass in New York in 2010. (via pinterest)

 

 



Art

Jonathan Schipper’s Robotic Sculpture Simulates a Glass Bottle Hurled at a Wall

December 12, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Measuring Angst is a robotic sculptural installation by artist Jonathan Schipper that simulates the mundane act of throwing a glass bottle across a room into a brick wall. The event happens in slow motion, taking nearly 12 minutes to complete as the bottle rotates slowly through the gallery space and then gradually explodes into smaller fragments before rewinding and starting again. Schipper also famously (and somewhat infamously if you’re a car aficionado) crashed two muscle cars over a period of six days in his pieces entitled The Slow Inevitable Death of American Muscle.

 

 



Art

Glass Pixel Cell Rabbit by Kohei Nawa

September 25, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Japanese artist Kohei Nawa (previously) just unveiled his latest creation, a small rabbit taxidermy covered in hundreds of translucent glass beads. Nawa refers to this sculpture series as pixel cell animals, and explains that “by covering the surface of an object with transparent glass beads, the existence of the object itself is replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ is shown.” This appears to be his first new pixel cell animal in nearly two years.

 

 



Art

The Glasswork of Shayna Leib

September 9, 2011

Christopher Jobson


Before the Rain. Photo by Jaime Young.


Before the Rain. Photo by Jaime Young.


Sirocco. Photo by Jaron Berman.


Sun Rising Over the Tundra. Photo by Jaime Young.

This week I was on the website of Echt Gallery here in Chicago when I stumbled onto these extraordinary glass sculptures by Madison-based artist Shayna Leib. Leib became obsessed with glass at the tender age of 7 when she saw a glassblowing demonstration at a local university, an experience that profoundly changed her life.

Each of the pieces in her Wind and Water takes nearly a month to create and involves a painstaking, multi-step process that begins with pulling individual 30-50 foot segments of glass called cane (imagine making 2400 °F taffy candy), a step that’s repeated 8 to 200 times depending on the scale of the piece. To clarify: she generates over 1 mile of thin glass pieces from which she cuts into tens of thousands of segments organized by shape and length. Next begins the tedious process of building the actual sculpture, requiring roughly 45 minutes for each two square inch area. This all seems practically impossible to me. I get dismayed when confronted with a jumbo-sized bag of carrots.


Penobscot. Photo by Jim Gill.


Moebius. Photo by Tom VanEndye.


Laminar. Photo by Jaime Young.


Laminar. Photo by Jaime Young.

The final pieces resemble flowing grass or perhaps coral reefs that whorl and overflow from one pane to the next. Leib says, “I use glass, not for its mimetic quality to capture the look of stone or plastic, but for its most unique properties; the inclination to flow, the capacity to freeze a moment in time, and its ability to manipulate optics.” If you’re in Chicago you can see her work being featured by Habatat Galleries Michigan November 4-6, 2011 at SOFA on Navy Pier.

If you like this, also check out the works of Nava Lubelski and Amy Eisenfeld Genser.

 

 



Photography

Glass Beach

August 22, 2011

Christopher Jobson

File this under I had no idea this existed. During the early 20th century residents of Fort Bragg, California chose to dispose of their waste by hurling it off the cliffs above a beach. No object was too toxic or too large as household appliances, automobiles, and all matter of trash were tossed into the crashing waves below, eventually earning it the name The Dumps. In 1967 the North Coast Water Quality Board closed the area completely and initiated a series of cleanups to slowly reverse decades of pollution and environmental damage. But there was one thing too costly (or perhaps impossible) to tackle: the millions of tiny glass shards churning in the surf. Over time the unrelenting ocean waves have, in a sense, cleansed the beach, turning the sand into a sparkling, multicolored bed of smooth glass stones now known as Glass Beach. The beach is now an unofficial tourist attraction and the California State Park System has gone so far as purchasing the property and incorporating it into surrounding MacKerricher State Park. (images courtesy digggs, matthew high, meganpru, lee rentz and linked to sources. via kuriositas)

 

 



Art

Graham Caldwell

April 29, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Brooklyn-based artist Graham Caldwell uses blown glass, steel, epoxy, mirrors, and other materials to create these otherworldly sculptures. See much more at G Fine Art, and Martos Gallery. (via booooooom)

 

 



Animation Photography

Bottles

April 14, 2011

Christopher Jobson

I love little quirky videos like this. A new stop motion piece by toosh. (via vimeo)

 

 

A Colossal

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Animal Multi-Tool