glass

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Art

Glass Insects and Plants Sculpted to Scale by Japanese Artist Yuki Tsunoda

February 3, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Molding tiny bits of soft Moretti glass with equally small tools, Japanese sculptor Yuki Tsunoda produces insects, flowers, and other types of plants at a size that is nearly to scale. Her subject matter is sparked by her interest to dissuade gut feelings of disgust when it comes to insects, and create works that highlight the beauty of their individual parts.

In addition to Moretti glass, Tsunoda achieves the metallic luminosity often found on insects’ wings and other parts of the body by incorporating dichroic glass and a form of quartz known as aventurine. You can view more of the 26-year-old artist’s miniature bugs and other scale glass works on her Twitter, or purchase one for yourself by going to her online shop. (via Spoon&Tamago)

  

 

 



Art

Oil Paintings of Eyes and Mouths on Glass by Henrik Uldalen

February 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of this ongoing series, self-taught painter Henrik Uldalen has been creating depictions of eyes and mouths on glass. The oil paintings are an extension of his focus on classic figurative painting where he explores “the dark sides of life, nihilism, existentialism, longing and loneliness, juxtaposed with fragile beauty.” Uldalen regularly shares his progress on Instagram and a few of these works are available in his shop.
(via My Amy Goes to 11, Juxtapoz)

 

 



Art

Artist Walead Beshty Shipped Glass Boxes Inside FedEx Boxes to Produce Shattered Sculptures

January 9, 2017

Christopher Jobson

FedEx® Large Box ©2005 FEDEX 139751 REV 10/05 SSCC, Priority Overnight, Los Angeles-New York trk#795506878000, November 27-28, 2007

In this intriguing sculptural series spanning 2005 to 2014, LA-based artist Walead Beshty packaged his artworks in FedEx boxes and shipped them across the country to exhibitions and galleries. But unlike most artists who utilize every bit of care to protect and pad their artwork from the inevitable rough handling of mail carriers, Beshty designed his pieces to break. For his famous FedEx works he constructed laminate glass objects that fit seamlessly within the dimensions of standard size shipping boxes. Through the “normal” handling the objects would inevitably crack and shatter and it was up to curators and gallerists to carefully remove each piece for display. The fragile volumes were then given titles that specifically mention the date, tracking number, and box size of shipment.

Not only was Beshty fascinated by obtaining a “fingerprint” of sorts that documented the journey of each package to its destination, but he also found it curious that a corporation has the ability to copyright the exact dimensions of a box, essentially owning an empty shape. He shares in a 2011 interview with Mikkel Carl:

The FedEx works […] initially interested me because they’re defined by a corporate entity in legal terms. There’s a copyright designating the design of each FedEx box, but there’s also the corporate ownership over that very shape. It’s a proprietary volume of space, distinct from the design of the box, which is identified through what’s called a SSCC #, a Serial Shipping Container Code. I considered this volume as my starting point; the
perversity of a corporation owning a shape—not just the design of the object—and
also the fact that the volume is actually separate from the box. They’re owned
independently from one another.

Furthermore, I was interested in how art objects acquire meaning through their context and through travel, what Buren called, something like, “the unbearable compromise of the portable work of art”. So, I wanted to make a work that was specifically organized around its traffic, becoming materially manifest through its movement from one place to another.

Here’s a brief video of Beshty explaining the project during the 2008 Whitney Biennial. (via BoingBoing)

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Image courtesy Arts on 5

FedEx boxes (various), 2008. Installation view, Signs of the Time, The Whitney Museum of American Art.

 

 



Art Craft

Bespoke Stained Glass Succulents by Lesley Green

December 20, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Influenced by elements of both architecture and illustration, artist Lesley Green (owner of Bespoke Glass) channels modern design while working with stained glass and glass tile. Her works have traditionally been quite geometric, however recently she has focused on more organic shapes, like in her latest series of succulent-based sculptures. These stained glass works mirror different types of cacti and agave plants, refracting beautiful light patterns through their green-tinted forms.

“I want to push the technical boundaries of stained glass, and love the challenge of figuring out how to solve problems, such as creating open spaces in a pattern,” said Green in an interview with Etsy. “Pattern and color are very important to me. I’m most often inspired by textiles in that respect.”

You can see more of her cacti creations and other glass tiles works on her Instagram and Etsy shop. (via So Super Awesome)

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Art

A Surreal Three-Dimensional World Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin

December 5, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

Dustin Yellin‘s latest installation (previously here and here) is more of an encased world than environment—ten modular glass blocks that together measure 20 feet long. Densely layered, each glass brick contains thousands of images meticulously sourced from magazines and books, arranged to created Yellin’s own alternate National Geographic universe. The pieces, which differ in dimension at the ends of the work and are uniformly sized near the middle, all contribute to a larger, and perhaps forecasted, story of war and peril. Not a pleasant look at the future of humanity, Yellin outlines scenes of greed and global warming, literally showing the fall of humanity from the tip of a glass-encased mountain to the depths of a turbulent sea.

This installation, titled Ten Parts, is part of a solo exhibition of Yellin’s work by the same name at GRIMM Gallery in Amsterdam which opens this Friday, November 25, and runs through January 7, 2017.

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

 

 



Food

DIY Edible Glass Cats: A Translucent Feline Water Cake that Melts Away in Minutes

November 16, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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In 2014, a dessert shop in Hokoto, Japan called the Kinseiken Seika Company exploded in popularity when the internet discovered their crystalline mizu Shingen mochi, a completely translucent edible cake that looks like a huge water droplet. The sweet gelatinous rice cake comprised mostly of mineral water and agar is so delicate it can only stand at room temperature for about 30 minutes before disappearing into a lumpy puddle.

Earlier this month Twitter user @mithiruka took a modified recipe for the mizu Shingen mochi and paired it with a silicon cat mold to make this jelly-like cake that’s now being shared by cat lovers across the internet—apparently there’s quite a few of them. (via RocketNews, My Modern Met)

 

 



Art

Undulating Glass Sculptures by Rick Eggert

November 10, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Florida-based sculptor Rick Eggert produces glass works that are often displayed as groups, each individual sculpture adding to a collective warm or cool gradient. Classified on his website as “Waves,” “Flames,” and “Dew Drops,” the glass-blown pieces all seem to gravitate toward natural elements, static objects that simulate the motion of fire and water. Currently Eggert is Creative Director of the Benzaiten Center for Creative Arts in Lake Worth, Florida. You can see more of his grouped glass sculptures on his portfolio site.

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