Tag Archives: graphite

Mimesis: New Anatomical Paintings Depicting Flora and Fauna by Nunzio Paci 

Bologna-based Italian artist Nunzio Paci (previously here and here) produces hauntingly detailed paintings that combine anatomical renderings with multi-colored blossoms and leaves. His latest series, Mimesis, is inspired by the idea of species evolving together over time, and the similarities shared by different organisms in order to better adapt to predators and climate.

“The concept, deriving from Plato and Aristotle’s theory on reality and imitation, draws inspiration from the natural phenomenon of mimicry in evolutionary biology and gives it a broader meaning,” Paci explained to Colossal. “In Mimesis, flora and fauna not only copy one another, they enmesh themselves in each other’s existence forming a cohesive organism, in an attempt to take shelter from the totality of the outside world.”

Within the series fauna helps to protect flora, creating a symbiotic relationship through the included animals’ death and rebirth. Flowers fill the hallows of presented carcasses while leaves grow to surround and overtake human skulls.

Paci recently exhibited these works as part of a solo show titled Mimesis at Galerie Stephanie in Manilla, Philippines and is currently a part of the group exhibition Dark Nature at Last Rites Gallery in New York City. You can see more of his work on Instagram and Facebook.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Life-Size Graphite Skeleton that Vibrates to Draw Itself into Nothingness 

batleskeleton_07

All images by Luke Abiol

Unlike the human body which is composed of only 18% carbon, Agelio Batle‘s latest project is produced from 100% of the semimetal material. The work, titled Ash Dancer, is a life-size skeleton that acts like a very large pencil. When placed on a custom made high-frequency vibrating table, the bones of the skeleton rub marks onto the surface, slowly creating an outline of its own form. The more the work rubs against the table, the more of itself is left behind, slowly transforming the graphite from sculpture to abstract drawings which Batle refers to as Ash Dances.

The piece is a part the exhibition “murmer | tremble” at Jack Fischer Gallery in San Francisco which opens November 5 and runs through December 29, 2016. You can see more work from Studio Batle on his website, and a number of his graphite objects are available in the Colossal Shop. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

batleskeleton_06

batleskeleton_02

batleskeleton_05

batleskeleton_03

batleskeleton_04

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , , .

Birds and Fauna Sprout From Nunzio Paci’s New Graphite and Oil Anatomical Renderings 

nunzio-paci-2015-13

Taking the analogy comparing blood vessels and tree branches literally, Nunzio Paci (previously) creates oil and graphite paintings that connect humans back to nature. Paci’s works look almost straight from a medical textbook except for one flaw—the trees and animals that sprout from his subjects’ mouths, chests, and necks. Paci ultimately takes a painterly approach to his works, paint dripping down the canvas to add balance to his extreme detail.

Paci’s practice centers on the relationship between man and nature, especially focusing on the visual overlap of our intrinsic and extrinsic systems. The beautiful and minimally colored works could be interpreted as extremely morbid—Paci showing us our ultimate fate when nature takes over.

Paci lives and works in Italy. His last exhibition was titled In the Garden of Idne at Oxholm Gallery in Copenhagen this past January.

nunzio-paci-2015-13-2

paci_01

paci_02

paci_07

paci_06

paci_08

paci_09

nunzio-paci-48

nunzio-paci-50

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Stunning Photo-Realistic Graphite Drawings by Monica Lee 

Monica_Lee_illustration_001

Malaysian artist Monica Lee is obsessed with details. But then again, I guess you have to be in order to create some of the most stunning photo-realistic drawings we’ve ever seen. “I like to challenge myself with complex portraits especially people with freckles or beard,” says Lee, who often works from photographic portraits to create seemingly identical drawings. Surprisingly, Lee worked in the digital world for 12 years before making the jump to illustration. But it certainly doesn’t show. She now spends 3-4 weeks on a single drawing. The artist attributes her love for hyperrealism to her father, who worked in the field of photography. You can follow Monica Lee on Facebook or Instagram. She also sells her complex drawings as smartphone cases. (via Illusion, IGNANT)

Monica_Lee_illustration_detail

Monica_Lee_illustration_002

Monica_Lee_illustration_003

Monica_Lee_illustration_004

Monica_Lee_illustration_005

Monica_Lee_illustration_007

Monica_Lee_illustration_008

Monica_Lee_illustration_009

Monica_Lee_illustration_girl_with_glasses

left: the girl with glasses by Marteline Nystad | right: Monica Lee’s illustration of the photograph

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .