Tag Archives: hands

Prismatic Sketches of Hands and Faces by Lui Ferreyra 

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Artist Lui Ferreyra draws colorful portraits of hands and faces, works that use discrete shapes of color as highlights and shadows. These geometric fragments are blended by the viewer’s eye rather than the artist’s hand, producing color fields that Ferreyra intends to call attention to the connection between seeing and language.

“There’s a double move at play here,” explains Ferreyra’s website about his work. “The first move is substantiated by a geometric matrix which functions as surface: it embraces and emphasizes the aspect of flatness within a complex network of geometric shapes, each unique unto itself. The second move is fulfilled by the cumulative effect of all the shapes functioning together as a color-field in which each shape contextualizes every other shape, thereby providing all the necessary visual cueing to manifest a kind of window one can look through. Surface and window, at and through, like language which points both at the world and back at itself.”

You can see more of Ferreyra’s colorful drawings, in addition to oil paintings, on InstagramFacebook, or William Havu Gallery where he is represented. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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The Delicate Floral Wax Sculptures and Laser Cut Paintings of Valerie Hammond 

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“Transition II” (2008), wax, silk and wire, 20x5x6″, courtesy of the artist and Littlejohn Contemporary, New York

Valerie Hammond imbues a delicate understanding of each material she works with, whether it’s sculpting flowers and hands from wax or laser cutting large outlines of women onto watercolor paper. Focused on the poetics of each work she produces, details are found not only on the pieces she creates, but the way they cast shadows onto the wall or rest atop a gallery plinth. Her piece “Girl” projects a poem by Emily Dickinson when pinned against the wall, doubling the work’s message in its own shadow.

Hammond received her MFA from the University of California at Berkley, and currently lives and works in New York City. Her work is included in public and private collections such as the Walker Art Center, The Library of Congress, the New York Public Library’s Print and Drawing Collection, the Getty Museum, the Grand Palais Museum, and many more. Hammond is represented by Littlejohn Contemporary in New York City.

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“Rose (Murmur)” (2011), wax, silk and wire, 10x8x5″, courtesy of the artist and Littlejohn Contemporary, New York

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“Girl” (2013), archival print on watercolor paper digitally laser cut, 31 ¼” x 13″, courtesy of the artist and Littlejohn Contemporary, New York

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“Girl” (2013), archival print on watercolor paper digitally laser cut, 31 ¼” x 13″, courtesy of the artist and Littlejohn Contemporary, New York

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“Forest Girl (What I see not, I better see)” (2008), edition variable of 5, laser-cut digital print, 31″ x 13 1/4″, courtesy of the artist and Littlejohn Contemporary, New York

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Image via Art is a Way

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Image via Art is a Way

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Image via Art is a Way

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The Microbes on the Handprint of an 8-Year-Old After Playing Outside 

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We all know our bodies are home to countless millions of bacteria and microorganisms, but without seeing them with our bare eyes it’s almost impossible to comprehend. This petri dish handprint created by Tasha Sturm of Cabrillo College, vividly illustrates the variety of bacteria found on her 8-year-old son’s hand after playing outdoors. The print itself represents several days of growth as different yeasts, fungi, and bacteria are allowed to incubate.

It’s safe to say almost everything you see growing in this specimen is harmless and in many cases even beneficial to a person’s immunity, but it just goes to show why we sometimes it’s good to wash our hands. Sturm discusses in detail how she made the print in the comments of this page. (via Ziya Tong)

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