Tag Archives: Hawaii

A Volcanic Eruption Photographed Against the Backdrop of the Milky Way, Moon, and a Streaking Meteor 

While photographing the surface flow of a volcano several weeks ago in Hawaii, photographer Mike Mezeul managed to capture an extraordinary number of natural phenomena in this single shot. His original intent was to photograph just the volcano itself, but he soon realized the scene had a bit more potential.

“When I found this surface flow and saw the clouds had cleared out, I knew I needed to at least try to get the stars above with the lava,” he tells Colossal. “As twilight faded, I saw that the position of the moon—which was just a sliver—was to the right of the Milky Way so I figured what the heck, might as well try to get the Milky Way with the lava.” After only three shots another fortuitous event occurred: a meteor just happened to streak across the sky.

For the skeptics, Mezeul shares that he used a Nikon D810 with a Nikon 14-24mm lens, with the following settings: F2.8, ISO 2500, 25″ exposure. You can see more of his landscape work on Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

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Aerial View of a Hawaiian Volcano Reveals a Giant Smiley Face 

Last week while flying above the Pu’u O’o crater in Hawaii, filmmaker Mick Kalber of Tropical Visions Video and pilot Colin Burkhardt were met with a cheerful surprise: the raging hot volcanic interior had cracked in the form of two lava eyes and a long crooked mouth. The once-in-a-lifetime view was caught on film and is one of many video clips Kalber frequently shares online and in his own volcano documentaries. (via Laughing Squid)

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Mauna Kea Heavens Timelapse or Three Minutes of Telescopes Shooting Lasers into Space 




Shot over a period of three nights in April of this year, this timelapse from Sean Goebel shows the myriad telescopes at the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii. The clear view at 14,000 feet is the premiere location for astronomy in the Northern Hemisphere. The lasers you see are called laser guide stars and they help astronomers correct the atmospheric distortion of light by creating an artificial “star” to use as a reference point. (via Coudal)

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