Tag Archives: Hong Kong

Striking Aerial Photos of Hong Kong Shrouded in Fog by Andy Yeung 

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All photos © Andy Yeung.

For his latest photo series Urban Fog, photographer Andy Yeung launched a DJI Phantom 3 from Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong to capture the city at night while covered in mist. Yeung said he was inspired by a similar project of the city photographed during the day, and was intrigued to see how he could present the city lights at night as they illuminated the fog. The photos are remarkable for their likeness to a thunderstorm with the cool lights of the city glowing inside the fog like flashes of lightning. You can see more of Yeung’s work on his website. (via Designboom)

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An Illustrated Cross Section of Hong Kong’s Infamous Kowloon Walled City 

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View a full-resolution version of the map.

The Kowloon Walled City in Hong Kong was built gradually—building on top of building—over time. Without a single architect, the ungoverned and most densely populated district became a haven for drugs, crime and prostitution until it was demolished in 1993. Photo documentation of the site exists but for the most part much of the inner-workings of the city remained a mystery.

Perhaps due to its proximity, Japan, in particular, developed a keen interest towards Kowloon. Its demolition in 1993 was broadcast on national television. But watching the footage, what most spectators didn’t realize was that up until the night before demolition a team of Japanese researchers were taking precise measurements and documenting the vacated city. Their findings were compiled into a book that, among other things, featured this panoramic cross section of the city depicting what life was like inside. You can read more about the book on Spoon & Tamago, and if you look hard enough, a few rare copies of it are available online. (via deconcrete)

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Photos of Hong Kong Construction Sites Wrapped in Colorful Cocoons by Peter Steinhauer 

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Like a burst of color on an otherwise grey canvas, a single majestically colored building rises out of a sea of dull grayness. This is not Christo’s latest “wrapping” project, which is what the photographer Peter Steinhaur first thought, naturally, upon encountering the phenomenon. In fact, these are construction sites wrapped in a colorful mesh material, a traditional method employed in Hong Kong to prevent debris from falling onto the streets below. According to Steinhauer, who’s lived and worked in Asia for the last 21 years – but was stunned to discover this unique construction method in Hong Kong – buildings are wrapped regardless of whether they’re coming up or going down. I’ve seen a similar method employed in Japan with smaller houses, but never anything of such monolithic scale. You can see many more photos over on Steinhauer’s site, where he has two series aptly titled “Cocoon.” (via Featureshoot)

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The World’s Largest Rubber Duck Arrives in Hong Kong 

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This week conceptual artist Florentijin Hofman brought his gargantuan Rubber Duck artwork to Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong. The huge inflatable duck measures nearly 46 feet tall and 55 feet long and is shown above being pulled by a tug boat only a fraction of its size. Hofman is well known for his grandiose and whimsical sculptures that seem born with the primary goal of inducing as many smiles possible. Via the artist’s website:

The Rubber Duck knows no frontiers, it doesn’t discriminate people and doesn’t have a political connotation. The friendly, floating Rubber Duck has healing properties: it can relieve mondial tensions as well as define them. The rubber duck is soft, friendly and suitable for all ages!

According to SCMP Rubber Duck will be on display in the harbor through June 9th, 2013. (via laughing squid, my modern met)

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Photographer Christian Åslund Turns the Streets of Hong Kong into a 2D Video Game 

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Stockholm-based photographer Christian Åslund recently payed tribute to retro 2D video games using the streets of Hong Kong as a backdrop. The photos were taken as part of an ad campaign for shoe brand Jim Rickey utilizing models who would lay flat on the streets or sidewalks to create the unique perspective. I’ve seen many photographers toy with this idea, but the wide-angle nature of these shots taken from such height creates a truly fun and expansive environment. See many more shots from the series here. (via design taxi)

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Urban Origami Installations on the Streets of Hong Kong and Vietnam by Mademoiselle Maurice 

This summer French paper artist Mademoiselle Maurice (previously) took her unique style of urban origami installation to the streets of Hong Kong and Vietnam where she created some of the pieces shown here. To be clear, the hexagonal pieces above were created in Paris just prior to her trip to Asia which you can learn more about (plus see many more photos) on her website.

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