household

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Art Photography

Futuristic Portholes Capture the View from France’s Aging ‘Tours Aillaud’ Apartment Towers

December 5, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Series “Les Yeux des Tours” (2015 – 2017). Tours Aillaud, Nanterre, France. All images courtesy Laurent Kronental.

Eighteen towers filled with more than 1,600 apartments were built by architect Emile Aillaud between 1973 and 1981. The housing complex is found in the Pablo Picasso district of Nanterre, an inner suburb of Paris. The residential towers range from 7 to 38 floors, yet each share peculiar windows shaped like futuristic portholes. French photographer Laurent Kronental has long been fascinated by these windows and their towering hosts which serve as the subject of his 2015-2017 series Les Yeux de Tours.

Kronental shoots through these windows to capture the landscape that lies far below their sky-high positions. Many of the images in the series simply focus on the exterior view, while others include  a glimpse into the lives of residents. Curtains and bed linens hint at the owners’ aesthetic preferences, while a few photographs capture more telling objects such as pianos and dishware.

“The mundane and the magic intermesh and merge through the porthole that acts as a two-way eye, the window of a flying living room, of a spaceship galley,” explains a statement about Kronental’s series. The futuristic details built into the architecture are now elements of the past, yet their inhabitants still share the dream of a bright future. The more homely elements of their lives severely contrast the flashy design elements of the buildings’ exteriors, aging wallpaper set against the sleek skyscrapers that exist right outside.

Kronental’s work from his earlier series Souvenir d’un Futur will be exhibited in the group exhibition French Landscapes, a Photographic Experience (1984-2017) at the Bibliothèque François-Mitterrand in Paris through February 4, 2018. The exhibition includes more than 1,000 photographs from 160 artists in order to provide a diverse depiction of the French landscape as seen over the last 40 years. You can see more of Kronental’s work on his website and Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art Design

The Uncomfortable: A Series of Inconvenient Household Items Designed by Katerina Kamprani

September 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The Uncomfortable is a series of impractical household objects by Athens-based architect Katerina Kamprani. The infuriating works play off of common dishware, cutlery, and watering cans, making the task each is typically assigned either impossible or extremely difficult. Every object is created from the material it would be constructed from normally, making siamese wine glasses and linked ceramic mugs all the more humorous.

Often before Kamprani creates the physical object, she will create a 3D model to test its shape. Two of my favorite hypothetical pieces are her toeless rainboots and concrete umbrella, neither of which have been physically produced.

To see more of her works from The Uncomfortable check out the architect’s Tumblr and Facebook.

 

 



Photography

High Speed Destruction

September 13, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Photographer Alan Sailer spends an inordinate amount of time photographing objects meeting a violent demise by means of high speed projectiles, high voltage explosions, and sometimes just hurling things at a wall. I love the other-worldly appearance some of the objects take on, especially the pear that appears to be liquifiying from the inside out. There are thousands of photos in his Flickr stream, the above are some of his most recent, and here are some of his favorites.

 

 



Animation Music

Adam Grabowski’s animation machines

May 11, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Film student Adam Grabowski was assigned the task of creating the show packaging for the 2011 Motion Graphics Showcase, at the School of Visual Arts in NYC. In a throwback to early animation he built five animation machines including (in order of appearance) a cassette player thaumatrope, a fan powered hamster wheel, a hand-held blender drum, an awesome motorized skateboard/image belt, and a drill powered flip book. In an age where almost anything you can imagine can be created digitally—especially in the realm of motion graphics—this is a welcome and captivating direction.

 

 



Art Photography

Kevin Van Aelst

January 11, 2011

Christopher Jobson

The work of Connecticut-based artist Kevin Van Aelst. (via today and tomorrow)