Tag Archives: humor

Happy Accidents Pour from Paint Bottles in Sculptures by Joe Suzuki 

Happy Accident – Mini Happy Face (Pink). Paint bottle, resin casting and enamel. 12″ x 7″ x 5.5″ in.

In this ongoing series of works by artist Joe Suzuki, pools of paint appear like maniacal smiles as they drip from cans and bottles. The colorful sculptures often pay tribute to artists like Warhol, Basquiat, and Keith Haring by referencing symbols used in their own works. The pieces are constructed with resin casting material and enamel, but give the appearance of freshly spilled paint.

“I consider my work to be artifacts of my own particular culture, which is not the generalized Japanese American culture, but that which formed as a direct result of being a first generation immigrant,” Suzuki shares in an artist statement. “Through a long assimilation process, I found myself not fully belonging to either culture, but rather somewhere in between, which I began to call Japamerica.”

You can explore additional works by Suzuki at Reem Gallery and on his website. (via Artsy)

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Salvador Dali Answers ‘Yes’ to Almost Every Single Question on the 1950s Game Show ‘What’s My Line?’ 

This clip of artist Salvador Dalí appearing on the game show “What’s My Line?” in 1957 is both charming and quite funny. A group of blindfolded panelists ask round after round of yes-or-no questions to help reveal the identity of the special guest. Due to the breadth of Dali’s work, and perhaps a bit of mischievousness, the surrealist painter finds himself answering “yes” to nearly every single question, much to everyone’s total confusion. With millions of views on YouTube this has probably crossed your path, but if you haven’t seen it, it really is a fun bit of TV. (via Mental Floss)

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Perspective: Hilariously Shortened Vehicles and Other Edited Oddities Race Around a City’s Streets 

Fernando Livschitz of Black Sheep Films (previously) edits everyday footage in order to add a touch of the bizarre to mundane scenes. In his most recent short film he imagines a world where certain vehicles have been hilariously shortened, landing tiny planes on one wheel, and racing single-car trains along a track. In addition to these edited vehicles, he removes horses and bikes from their riders, making it seems as if jockeys and bicyclists are effortlessly floating through the world. You can see more of Livschitz’s short films, many of which are Vimeo staff picks, on his website.

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CTRL+X: Street Artists “Delete” Graffiti with a Painted Anamorphic Illusion 

All photos © Anna Christova

As part of the Stenograffia street art and graffiti festival in Russia, a collaborative of artists worked to create this phenomenal illusion that appears to “erase” a collection of graffiti from a small car and trash dumpster. With the help of a projector, the team painted the familiar grey and white checker grid found in most graphics applications that denotes a deleted or transparent area. The piece is titled “CTRL+X” in reference to the keyboard command in Photoshop for deleting a selection. You can see nearly 100 behind-the-scenes photos of their process here. (via The Awesomer, Mass Appeal)

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Oil Paintings That Integrate Oversized Animals Into Found Vintage Photographs by Anja Wülfing 

Anja Wulfing adds large animals into the black and white scenes of found vintage photographs, turning the attention away from the somber faces of its subjects and to the creatures that pose quite naturally behind their backs. The surprising inclusions are painted in by Wulfing, and often take the form of birds—such as crows, owls, ducks, and the occasional rooster. The animals either join the members of the photograph or merge with its occupants, sometimes replacing the heads of those posing to create hybrid and humorous creatures.

You can see more of Wulfing’s subtle animal additions on her Instagram and Behance. (via Lustik)

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The Playfully Surreal Photography of Ben Zank 

Brooklyn-based photographer Ben Zank has an eye for the unusual. Strange juxtapositions, awkward inconveniences, and often the ongoing struggle of life itself are all expressed through his surreal photography. Zank often portrays figures (some of which are self-portraits) as physically encumbered with faces obscured or turned away from the camera, seemingly in the throes of personal conflict. Yet despite the adversity in each photo, the element of humor seems constantly present. It’s hard not to laugh and smile at the absurd predicaments he conceives of for each shot, reminding us all to take a step back sometimes and just laugh at the ridiculousness of it all.

Zank shares his work almost exclusively through Instagram and prints of some photos are available through Opium Gallery.

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