Tag Archives: humor

How to Make the World’s Smallest Cup of Coffee 

For their brand new advertisement, Finnish coffee roaster Paulig asked director and animator Lucas Zanotto to brew a cup of coffee from a single bean. Using a nail file to create the grounds, Zanotto then boils water over a single tea light, and finally pours the freshly brewed java one drop at a time into a thimble-sized mug. The video has a direct relationship to recently popularized miniature cooking videos on Youtube, which have produced everything from miniature deep-fried chicken to tiny shrimp tempura. You can watch more of the Helsinki-based director’s videos on his Instagram and Vimeo, and take a look at Zanotto’s miniature coffee brewing techniques above.

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Comical Ceramic Figures Produced With Ancient Materials by Luciano Polverigiani 

South American artist Luciano Polverigiani creates ceramic objects that lay at the intersection of fine art sculptures and toys, figures that are designed with both a playful and thoughtfully considered eye. Each work is produced from various clays and mud, and then fired with eucalyptus wood in a gas kiln at the ideal temperature for vitrification. Although much of Polverigiani’s work is about experimentation with enamel and color glazes, the artist limits himself to materials that were readily available to ancient civilizations. You can view more of his ceramic figures on his Behance.

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Animals Etched onto Dirty Cars by Illustrator Nikita Golubev 

Over the last few weeks, Moscow-based artist and illustrator Nikita Golubev has taken to the streets to etch images of animals onto the sides of completely filthy vehicles. The reductive process involves creating “clean” spots by wiping or scraping his images onto the gritty surface of each car. You can see more from his “Dirty Art” series on Facebook. (via Twisted Sifter)

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Digital Artist Omar Aqil Interprets Picasso Paintings as Sleek Modern Sculptures 

For this series titled MIMIC, Pakistan-based digital artist and art director Omar Aqil took a random selection of artworks by Pablo Picasso and completely reimagined them as 3D renderings. While Picasso himself created hundreds of sculptures, Aqil’s interpretations add a bit of whimsy and his own personal touch to the 20th century artist’s oil paintings, bringing voluminous textures and unexpected depth to famous pieces like “Seated Woman” and “Monument to the Spaniard“.

Aquil says he has long been fascinated by Picasso’s artwork, and offers this project as a visual example of how different people might interpret an artwork. Indeed when looking back and forth between the two pieces you might find yourself seeing the original painting in a new way. Check out the entire project here, and prints are available by contacting the artist directly. (via Highsnobiety)

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Wardrobe Snacks: Thoughtfully Composed Outfits that Perfectly Match Different Foods 

As part of a fantastic collaborative project between photographer Kelsey McClellan and prop/set stylist Michelle Maguire, the duo conceived of wardrobes that would perfectly match various foods. Titled Wardrobe Snacks, the series draws inspiration from the color, texture, or design of simple foods like a green ice cream cone, a plain yellow donut, or even an oyster and finds the uncannily matched outfit. You can see the full series here. (via artnau, This Isn’t Happiness)

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Paper Cutouts by ‘Paperboyo’ Transform World Landmarks into Quirky Scenes 

London-based paper artist and photographer Rich McCor (aka. paperboyo) has a way of seeing the world from a slightly different perspective. By adding a simple paper cutout to the foreground of famous buildings or other popular tourist attractions, he creates novel moments in time where an octopus squirms from inside the Colosseum or a WW2-era sailor embraces the Leaning Tower of Pisa in reference to the famous photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt. McCor makes frequent mentions to pop culture by recreating scenes from films or by repurposing works from other artists. To see what he dreams up next you can join his near quarter million followers on Instagram. (via Creators Project)

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