humor

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Art Design

Unendurable Line: A Fun Short Film Tracks the Movement of Everyday Objects as a Real-Time Graph

September 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

There’s simply no compelling way to describe this unusual short film from director Daihei Shibata which attempts to plot the movement of everyday objects such as a light switch or a spring as a real-time graph. Sibata explains this as a film that expresses “the various thresholds hidden in everyday life.” OK, interesting enough, but when paired with a score by the EX NOVO Chamber Choir—turn up the volume—it suddenly becomes completely amazing. I’d love to see a whole series of these. If you like this, all check out The Beauty of Mathematics. (via The Awesomer)

 

 



Art

Humorous Sculptures Twisted Into Unconventional Forms by Sergio Garcia

August 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Dallas-based artist Sergio Garcia creates simple, yet surreal moments within his sculptures, often incorporating realistic hands that are paused in the act of forming a bubble, or spray painting a wall. In one sculpture in particular, By Any Means, a miniature hand reaches out from a pencil’s eraser as it is being sharpened, almost as if to stop the mechanism in which the utensil is trapped.

“I have always enjoyed the use of the unconventional as a base for my artwork,” says Garcia in an artist statement. “I enjoy creating art that people can relate to and that stimulates the creative subconscious. Not only to create an emotional relationship between art and viewer, but to conjure up questions of how and why. It is this desire to create a connection with the viewer that fuels my creativity.”

Another subject matter Garcia focuses on is tricycles, creating sculptural versions of the childhood toy with loops, hearts, and figure eights in place of the traditional frame. The bright red and pink works range from life-size to palm-size, yet when photographed each appear incredibly realistic.

You can see more work form the Cuban-American artist on his Instagram and website.


 

 



Animation Music

A Quirky Animated Short Featuring Musical Robots that Play Themselves

August 8, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Here at Colossal we can’t stop jamming out to this animated short from London-based animation studio Animade featuring six bubbly musical robots designed to play themselves. Titled Robot & The Robots, the clip was created as an internal studio project, but you can see more of their commercial work here. If you like this, also check out Michael Marczewski’s Vicious Cycle. (via Vimeo)

 

 



Photography

Miniature Scenes Set Amongst Office Supplies by Derrick Lin

August 2, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Photographer Derrick Lin captures the minutiae of everyday office life across landscapes of notebooks, paper clips, and coffee mugs populated with tiny figures. Working only with his iPhone, desk lighting, and a broad array of miniatures, Lin creates visual commentary on office life as well as recreations of popular artworks or scenes of escape. Many of his photos have been collected into an upcoming book titled Work, Figuratively Speaking: The Big Setbacks and Little Victories of Office Life, published this fall through Universe. See more on Instagram. (via Creators Project)

 

 



History

Archeologists Unearth Ancient Smiley Face on a 3,700-Year-Old Jug

July 25, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

A team of Turkish and Italian archeologists working on a site in southern Turkey discovered an interesting object recently, an ancient smiley face drawn on the side of an off white jug. The faded face is simplistically drawn, two black dots hovering over a crooked arch just below, and is so subtle it was not noticed until it had been transported to a lab for restoration.

“The smiling face is undoubtedly there (there are no other traces of painting on the flask) and has no parallels in ancient ceramic art of the area,” said Dr. Nicolo Marchetti of Bologna University, who led the excavation.

The crew had been at the site of its discovery for the last seven summers, an area that was once the ancient Hittite city Karkemish. The object is unlike anything else they have encountered in the area, however it was not the only important thing unearthed. The team also found 250 clay bullae, or tokens that would have been attached to legal documents, a large basalt relief of two griffons, and the remains of both a fortress and grain silo.

The architectural site will be open to the public next year as the Karkemish Ancient City Archaeological Park. You can visit the ancient smiley close by when it goes on display at the Gaziantep Museum of Archaeology. (via The History Blog)

 

 



Art

Happy Accidents Pour from Paint Bottles in Sculptures by Joe Suzuki

July 19, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Happy Accident – Mini Happy Face (Pink). Paint bottle, resin casting and enamel. 12″ x 7″ x 5.5″ in.

In this ongoing series of works by artist Joe Suzuki, pools of paint appear like maniacal smiles as they drip from cans and bottles. The colorful sculptures often pay tribute to artists like Warhol, Basquiat, and Keith Haring by referencing symbols used in their own works. The pieces are constructed with resin casting material and enamel, but give the appearance of freshly spilled paint.

“I consider my work to be artifacts of my own particular culture, which is not the generalized Japanese American culture, but that which formed as a direct result of being a first generation immigrant,” Suzuki shares in an artist statement. “Through a long assimilation process, I found myself not fully belonging to either culture, but rather somewhere in between, which I began to call Japamerica.”

You can explore additional works by Suzuki at Reem Gallery and on his website. (via Artsy)

 

 



Art History

Salvador Dali Answers ‘Yes’ to Almost Every Single Question on the 1950s Game Show ‘What’s My Line?’

July 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

This clip of artist Salvador Dalí appearing on the game show “What’s My Line?” in 1957 is both charming and quite funny. A group of blindfolded panelists ask round after round of yes-or-no questions to help reveal the identity of the special guest. Due to the breadth of Dali’s work, and perhaps a bit of mischievousness, the surrealist painter finds himself answering “yes” to nearly every single question, much to everyone’s total confusion. With millions of views on YouTube this has probably crossed your path, but if you haven’t seen it, it really is a fun bit of TV. (via Mental Floss)