Tag Archives: insects

Time-lapse Scenes of Swarming Fireflies by Vincent Brady

Time lapse Scenes of Swarming Fireflies by Vincent Brady timelapse nature insects fireflies

Time lapse Scenes of Swarming Fireflies by Vincent Brady timelapse nature insects fireflies

This is a fantastic feat of photography and editing by Vincent Brady who shot this montage of firefly timelapses in 2013 at Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri and around his home in Grand Ledge, Michigan. To make the timelapse Brady had to master several different cameras, learn about photo stacking, 360° panoramas, and even how to pilot a pontoon boat to get all the requisite shots. While we’ve seen several articles here on Colossal featuring long-exposure fireflies it’s still fascinating to see them in motion like this. You can read about Brady’s adventures on his website, and learn more about the science of fireflies on It’s Okay To Be Smart. (via It’s Okay To Be Smart)

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill nature moths macro insects butterflies

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill nature moths macro insects butterflies

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill nature moths macro insects butterflies

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill nature moths macro insects butterflies

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill nature moths macro insects butterflies

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill nature moths macro insects butterflies

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill nature moths macro insects butterflies

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill nature moths macro insects butterflies

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill nature moths macro insects butterflies

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill nature moths macro insects butterflies

A biochemist by training, photographer Linden Gledhill is fascinated by the beauty of infinitesimally small aspects of nature and science, from capturing the flight of insects to exploring the beauty of magnetic ferrofluid. Among his most jaw-dropping images are macro photographs of butterfly wings that reveal complex patterns that look like perfectly organized flower petals. These tiny protrusions are actually scales, similar to what you would find on reptile, though extremely small and fragile. Gledhill’s photography recently inspired an episode of Smarter Every Day where Destin Sandlin learns how to shoot similar photos. (via awkwardsituationist.tumblr.com)

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees
Photo by William Eakin

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees
Photos by William Eakin

In North America, Europe and many other parts of the world, bee populations have plummeted 30-50% due to colony collapse disorder, a fact not lost on artist Aganetha Dyck who for years has been working with the industrious insects to create delicate sculptures using porcelain figurines, shoes, sports equipment, and other objects left in specially designed apiaries. As the weeks and months pass the ordinary objects are slowly transformed with the bees’ wax honeycomb. It’s almost impossible to look at final pieces without smiling in wonder, imagining the unwitting bees toiling away on a piece of art. And yet it’s our own ignorance of humanity’s connection to bees and nature that Dyck calls into question, two completely different life forms whose fate is inextricably intertwined.

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb wax sculpture nature insects bees

Born in Manitoba in 1937, the Canadian artist has long been interested in inter-species communication and her research has closely examined the the ramifications of honeybees disappearing from Earth. Working with the insects results in completely unexpected forms which can be surprising and even humorous. “They remind us that we and our constructions are temporary in relation to the lifespan of earth and the processes of nature,” comments curator Cathi Charles Wherry. “This raises ideas about our shared vulnerability, while at the same time elevating the ordinariness of our humanity.”

If you want to learn more I suggest watching the video above from the Confederation Centre of the Arts, and if you want to see her work up close Dyck opens an exhibition titled Honeybee Alterations at the Ottawa School of Art on March 3, 2014. A huge thanks to Gibson Gallery as well as Aganetha and Deborah Dyck for their help. All photos courtesy Peter Dyck and William Eakin.

The Golden Age of Insect Aviation

This clip has been making the rounds everywhere lately, and for good reason. Just 10 seconds long and guaranteed to put an instant smile on your face. Created by Wayne Unten. (via The Kid Should See This)

Vintage Porcelain Dishes Covered in Hordes of Hand-Painted Ants

Vintage Porcelain Dishes Covered in Hordes of Hand Painted Ants porcelain insects ceramics

Vintage Porcelain Dishes Covered in Hordes of Hand Painted Ants porcelain insects ceramics

Vintage Porcelain Dishes Covered in Hordes of Hand Painted Ants porcelain insects ceramics

Vintage Porcelain Dishes Covered in Hordes of Hand Painted Ants porcelain insects ceramics

Vintage Porcelain Dishes Covered in Hordes of Hand Painted Ants porcelain insects ceramics

Vintage Porcelain Dishes Covered in Hordes of Hand Painted Ants porcelain insects ceramics

Vintage Porcelain Dishes Covered in Hordes of Hand Painted Ants porcelain insects ceramics

Vintage Porcelain Dishes Covered in Hordes of Hand Painted Ants porcelain insects ceramics

While the standard response to insects crawling across your food or dinner plate is usually nothing less than repulsion, that didn’t stop German artist Evelyn Bracklow of La Philie from creating these one-of-a-kind vintage porcelain dishes covered in hordes of hand-painted ants. Bracklow says of the pieces:

The idea for this work resulted from pure chance, when the sight of a carelessly placed plate—by then wandered by ants—fascinated me so much that I felt the urge to simply conserve this image. Fear, disgust, fascination and admiration: this very interplay of feelings constitutes the charm of the work. Furthermore, to me, the ants symbolize all the stories that any formerly discarded piece of porcelain carries with it. Where one once dined and drank, today ants bustle in ever new formations, every single one applied with a great love for detail.

It’s not hard to see that each piece is incredibly detailed and well-executed, making it strangely beautiful despite what it portrays. This balance of superb execution versus creepy subject matter may be the reason she’s had no problem selling the objects over on Etsy, where a number of them are currently available. (via Whimsebox)

Terrifying ‘Orchid Mantis’ is Camouflaged to Look Exactly Like a Pink Orchid Flower

Terrifying Orchid Mantis is Camouflaged to Look Exactly Like a Pink Orchid Flower nature insects flowers camouflage

Terrifying Orchid Mantis is Camouflaged to Look Exactly Like a Pink Orchid Flower nature insects flowers camouflage

In an unparalleled feat of natural selection the Orchid Mantis (Hymenopus coronatus) from Southeast Asia has evolved to look almost exactly like an orchid flower in order to lure unsuspecting prey. If looking like a plant isn’t impressive enough the clever insect also changes color from pink to brown according to its environment. (via Boing Boing)

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab macro insects bees
Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab macro insects bees
Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab macro insects bees
Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab macro insects bees
Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab macro insects bees
Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab macro insects bees
Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab macro insects bees
Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab macro insects bees
Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab macro insects bees
Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Macro Bee Portraits by Sam Droege and the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab macro insects bees
Courtesy Sam Droege / USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab

Sam Droege is the head of the USGS Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Program in Maryland, an organization that monitors the health and habitat of bees in the U.S. as well as creating archival reference catalogs that aid researchers in the identification of bee species in North America. The project is no small task as there are literally thousands of bee species in the U.S., some of which vary in only the most minute ways that may not even be distinguishable to the naked eye.

To aid in the identification process the USGS Bee Inventory relies on extremely high resolution photography, an initiative led by Droege that has been ongoing since 2010. Droege’s macro photos of bees are so clear and well executed that they practically pass as works of art in their own right. He shares with Flickr:

“When we started looking at these pictures, I just wanted to gaze at these shots for long periods of time,” Sam says. “I had seen these insects for many years, but the level of detail was incredible. The fact that everything was focused, the beauty and the arrangement of the insects themselves — the ratios of the eyes, the golden means, the french curves of the body, and the colors that would slide very naturally from one shade to another were just beautiful! It was the kind of thing that we could not achieve at the highest level of art.”

You can see many more of these bee portraits (as well as photos of other insects and even animals) over on Flickr. (via Daring Fireball, Flickr)

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin insects illustration drawing

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin insects illustration drawing

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin insects illustration drawing

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin insects illustration drawing

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin insects illustration drawing

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin insects illustration drawing

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin insects illustration drawing

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin insects illustration drawing

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin insects illustration drawing

Latvia-based graphic artist and illustrator Alex Konahin (previously) recently completed work on a new series of ornate insect drawings titled Little Wings. The illustrations were made using pens and india ink in his distinctive style that makes used of ornate scrolls and intricate floral designs. If this is the first time you’ve seen Konahin’s work, be sure to check out his amazing Anatomy drawings, and you can also see lots more on Facebook and Tumblr. (via Faith is Torment)

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