Tag Archives: insects

Embroidered Haute Couture Box Bugs by Noboru Hoareau 

French embroidery artist Noboru Hoareau recently stitched this fun series of creepy insects, spiders, and arthropods comprised mostly of beads. Each piece is embroidered into fabric and framed, an objects he refers to as a “embroidery haute couture box bug”. You can see much more in his Etsy shop. If you liked these, also check out the work of Humayrah Bint Altaf and Adam Pritchett. (via Lustik)

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Imaginative Insects Formed From Resin and Brass by Hiroshi Shinno 

Japanese artist Hiroshi Shinno builds hyperrealistic sculptures of insects that don’t exist, perfect forms of imaginative species that look as if they were built from vibrant leaves and delicate flower petals. Even these aspects of the creatures are false, as each leaf or petal was cast from resin and painted with acrylic paint before being placed on the model’s brass base.

In addition to building these fantastical works, Shinno also sketches the initial ideas for his imaginative creatures in an Insect Diary on his website. You can see more of the Kyoto-born artist’s insect-based sculptures and 3D work on his Tumblr. (via Lustik)

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Glass Insects and Plants Sculpted to Scale by Japanese Artist Yuki Tsunoda 

Molding tiny bits of soft Moretti glass with equally small tools, Japanese sculptor Yuki Tsunoda produces insects, flowers, and other types of plants at a size that is nearly to scale. Her subject matter is sparked by her interest to dissuade gut feelings of disgust when it comes to insects, and create works that highlight the beauty of their individual parts.

In addition to Moretti glass, Tsunoda achieves the metallic luminosity often found on insects’ wings and other parts of the body by incorporating dichroic glass and a form of quartz known as aventurine. You can view more of the 26-year-old artist’s miniature bugs and other scale glass works on her Twitter, or purchase one for yourself by going to her online shop. (via Spoon&Tamago)

  

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Ornate Insect Embroideries by Humayrah Bint Altaf Incorporate Antique Materials and Metallic Beads 

Embroidery artist Humayrah Bint Altaf stitches fabulously ornate insects and trees that incorporate antique gold twist cord, hundreds of metallic beads, Rococo threads, and other delicate materials. The end results are scarab beetles that could practically crawl off the canvas and honey bees prepared to take flight.

“I often wander through the woods near my home, where I gather leaves, twigs, feathers and other things I can find to bring back home and preserve,” says Bedford-based Altaf. “I also like to incorporate nature’s treasures into my embroideries and with each piece I feel that a part of me has been embedded into my work.”

With a background in fashion design, Altaf had the opportunity to study at the Royal School of Needlework that helped launch her career in embroidery. She now sells original works through an online shop and shares much of her process on Instagram. (via The Creators Project)

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DIY Paper Beetle Sculpture Kits by Assembli 

Designer Joop Bource of Netherlands-based Assembli just released this colorful trio of DIY beetle models. The flat-pack model kits are available in three different beetle species including stag, hercules, and atlas, each in a number of different metallic colors. The kits are currently available on Etsy. (via Lustik)

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Artist Aki Inomata Provides Bagworms with Snippets of High Fashion to Create Matching Cocoons 

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Commenting on female consumer culture in Japan, artist Aki Inomata decided to dress female bagworms in extravagant attire, handing clippings of women’s dresses to the insects in order to transform them into protective cases. In nature, male bagworms shed these cases when they become moths. Females however, remain in these cases their entire lives, waiting patiently for the attention of a male. Reminded of the similarities to her own gender performance in Japan, Inomata exhibited her work with female bagworms at a department store that sells women’s clothing, her own commentary on what lengths women must still go to in order to be aesthetically accepted by society.

This is not the only time Inomata has worked with bugs or animals to alter their interpretation of the world. From 2009-2016 she crafted shells for hermit crabs based on differently global cities, and in 2009 she took French lessons with a parakeet. Inomata is represented by Maho Kubota Gallery in Tokyo and you can see more of her work on her website.

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