Tag Archives: installation

An Immersive Forest of 60,000 Rainbow Numbers by Emmanuelle Moureaux 

In celebration of The National Art Center of Tokyo‘s 10th anniversary, French architect Emmanuelle Moureaux was commissioned to fill the institution’s 6500 square foot exhibition space with her vision of the decade to come. Unsurprisingly, Moureaux, whose practice often involves layering color within space, decided to transform the white cube into a rainbow forest filled with more than 60,000 multi-colored numbers arranged in three dimensional grids.

The installation, Forest of Numbers, is composed of 10 layers, each to represent the next 10 years. Figures 0 through 9 create the 4 digits needed for each year. The numbers are also divided into 100 shades to align with Moureaux’s 100 Colors installation series which she has installed around the world since 2013. You can see previous installations from this series on her website. (via My Modern Met)

  

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Local and International Artists Produce 21 Light Installations For the Inaugural Toronto Light Festival 

Images via Thane Lucas/Toronto Light Festival

Set within a district of Victorian industrial buildings, the Toronto Light Festival is a free 45-day festival occurring during this year’s winter months as a way to creatively draw the city’s inhabitants out of their homes. Featuring 21 diverse light installations built by local and international artists and thousands of glowing bulbs, the festival covers a total of 13 acres in the city’s Distillery District. Installations range from a series of lit figures appearing to jump from the roof of one of the historic buildings to two red, geometric cats prowling an included alleyway, with several multi-colored works in-between.

You can catch Toronto’s first ever light art festival until March 12, or follow the festival on Instagram to catch snapshots of the glowing installations.

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A Sprawling Coral-Like Structure Suspended Above an Orlando Convention Center by Marc Fornes 

All photos © Marc Fornes / The Very Many

An interconnected pathway of tubular branches hangs above the Orange County Convention Center (OCCC) in Orlando, Florida, an installation produced from perforated aluminum by architect Marc Fornes and his studio The Very ManyUnder Magnitude, which appears like a large segment of bleached coral, is composed of over 4,600 strips of metal, each just a millimeter thick. When formed into tubes however, the material increases in strength, allowing it to be walked over without damage.

This installation is suspended from the OCCC’s atrium to create a sort of secondary ceiling, its white surface highlighted by the windows that surround it. Passersby can view the work from both above and below, allowing the hollow structure to be seen from multiple vantage points.

“Borrowing and mismatching elements from the world, pushing them out of scale and hybridising them to the realm of the bizarre, the structure achieves a familiar yet mysterious quality, at once friendly and alien,” said The Very Many in Dezeen.

Under Magnitude is based on a previous nonlinear structure titled nonLin/Lin Pavilion installed at the FRAC Centre in Orleans, France by Fornes and his studio in 2011. You can see more projects by the art+architectural studio on their website, and view a behind-the-scenes video of Under Magnitude below. (via NOTCOT, Dezeen)

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Artist Windy Chien Unearths Obscure Knots Everyday for an Entire Year 

In January of 2016, artist Windy Chien devoted herself to learning a new knot every day for a year, tying a total of 366 by December 31st (2016 was a leap year). Although 366 knots might seem like a staggering number, it is nothing compared to the 3,900 included in Chien’s go-to knot manual—The Ashley Book of Knots, which took its author nearly 11 years to compile.

The daily ritual was both meditative and informative for the Apple project manager turned artist, allowing Chien to access an energetic flow, while also giving her a chance for constant experimentation with line and form. You can see a selection of Chien’s knots on her website, and view the entirety of the project on Instagram. (via Wired)

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A New Large-Scale Installation of Boats and Tangled Thread by Artist Chiharu Shiota 

All images, “Where are we going?” Installation by Chiharu Shiota at Le Bon Marché Rive Gauche, copyright Gabriel de la Chapelle

The newest installation by Chiharu Shiota (previously here and here) is composed of nearly 300,000 yards of white yarn, woven to encapsulate the center, ground floor, and ten windows of Le Bon Marché. The exhibition, titled Where are we going?, will feature 150 boats within the French department store’s center, and the ground-floor exhibition will house a giant threaded wave that visitors are encouraged to walk through. Despite boats being a common theme in Shiota’s work, this installation will mark the first time she has used white yarn, previously creating installations with only black or red thread.

The title of the exhibition, Where are we going?, refers to the mysterious destinations that pinpoint each of our individual and collective lives. Therefore the boats in this installation represent vessels sailing towards unknown locations, the works expressing both a sense of poetry and a sense of unease over what is to come.

“I am struck by the multiplicity of interactions that we experience every day, by their connections with the past and the future,” said Shiota in an interview with Le Bon Marché. “The creation of this indecipherable mesh and its plasticity are a mystery, just like our brain, the universe, and of course, life. I have no answers, only questions. These questions are the foundations of my work.”

Last year Le Bon Marché organized a large exhibition of Ai WeiWei's work which featured a 65-foot bamboo and silk dragon in the store’s atrium. Shiota’s Where are we going? will be displayed at Le Bon Marché through February 18, 2017. (via Fubiz)

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A Quarter Mile of Reflective Poles Mirror the Changing Tides 

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

A quarter mile installation of nearly 250 mirrored posts stood tall on California’s Laguna Beach coast, the work reflecting back the Pacific Ocean’s subtle changes for four days last November. 1/4 Mile Arc is the latest outdoor work by Phillip K Smith III, the Los Angeles born artist who previously built a reflective cabin within Joshua Tree’s expansive desert plains. 1/4 Mile Arc’s 10-foot poles were positioned to specifically mark the curve of the beach just beyond the high tide line, ensuring the work would reflect the waves it faced rather than being swallowed by their force.

The work was commissioned by the Laguna Art Museum for the fourth annual Art & Nature program from the 3rd to 6th of last November. You can watch Smith’s installation against the changing tides in a video by photographer Lance Gerber below. (via Dezeen)

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Eric Stoner, courtesy of Laguna Art Museum

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