Tag Archives: interview

Anthony Howe’s Otherworldly Kinetic Sculptures Powered by Wind

Anthony Howes Otherworldly Kinetic Sculptures Powered by Wind sculpture kinetic sculpture interview

The Creator’s Project recently visited with kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe who creates kinetic artworks powered by wind. You might remember Howe from a piece here on Colossal back in July. Watch the video above to learn more about his artistic philosophy and watch some excellent footage of his hypnotic sculptures.

Some Colossal News

Some Colossal News interview colossal

I have some pretty exciting news to kick off the week. About four months ago I received an email from an editor at Wired asking if I might be interested in writing for them occasionally. After mulling things over for a few seconds I decided I was extremely interested. I pitched my first few ideas and now in the December issue you can flip to page 80 and find a piece I wrote on figurative sculptor Evan Penny (previously). I can’t tell you how thrilled and honored I am to be contributing to one of my favorite magazines, and want to thank my editor, Sarah Fallon, for helping me learn the ropes. The article isn’t online just yet, but I’ll be sure to link it up soon.

Some Colossal News interview colossal

In more news, I was recently interviewed by my good friend Philip Haritgan over on Hyperallergic. If you’re interested in how Colossal got started, about how I curate content, or if you’d like to see my son’s art blog debut, head on over. A huge thanks to Philip and the great folks at Hyperallergic for the opportunity!

Gehard Demetz

Gehard Demetz wood sculpture interview body

Gehard Demetz wood sculpture interview body

Gehard Demetz wood sculpture interview body

Hi-Fructose has a brief interview with artist Gehard Demetz as well as several exquisite photos of new work. Demetz carves almost lifelike wood sculptures of children that appear riddled with gaps and are often impacted with objects. The artist currently has work at the Venice Biennale through December 8th.

Interview with Federico Uribe

Interview with Federico Uribe sculpture interview installation

Interview with Federico Uribe sculpture interview installation

Interview with Federico Uribe sculpture interview installation

Interview with Federico Uribe sculpture interview installation

Interview with Federico Uribe sculpture interview installation

Here’s a great interview with one of my favorite artists, Federico Uribe (previously) who uses repurposed objects like athletic shoes and hardware to create sculptures of animal and plant life. The video captures numerous shots of his current exhibition, The World According to Federico Uribe at the Boca Raton Museum of Art that’s still up through December 4. One of my favorite quotes from the video: “In time I learned that celebrating life was better than complaining about it.” Words to live by. The interview was produced and directed by David Marin of Pelicruise Film Group. (thnx, david!)

Jill Sylvia Interviewed by In the Make

Jill Sylvia Interviewed by In the Make sculpture paper interview

Jill Sylvia Interviewed by In the Make sculpture paper interview

Jill Sylvia Interviewed by In the Make sculpture paper interview

In the Make recently published a great interview with paper artist Jill Sylvia (previously) including a number of tantalizing process photos of her signature cut ledger paper sculptures. If you’re not familiar, In the Make is a weekly collaborative interview and photo series between photographer Klea McKenna and writer Nikki Grattan. From their about page:

Through studio visits with artists and designers, we hope to explore each artist’s
space, process, influences, and the behind-the-scenes elements that are often unseen in the finished work. We look to highlight the ways in which each artist’s personal aesthetic pervades their environment and reveals their perspective. We are also interested in the daily realities of making creative work and how each artist sustains their practice.

Their impressive list of interviews includes studio chats with Jesse Schlesinger, Christina Empedocles (previously), and Josephine Taylor. Well worth your time.

Five Questions with Lustik

Five Questions with Lustik website interview

One of the most unassuming of my daily stops is also one of the most incredible. The impeccably curated Lustik is a treasure trove of great art, design, and all things creative and interesting. After few weeks of following and sourcing several posts here on Colossal I decided it was time to learn more about the mysterious person behind this Tumblr who posts anonymously, without even a hint of information on the site. Luckily she responded to a shout-out a few weeks ago and I was able to ask her a few quick questions.

Who are you?
I’m Béatrice Lucas, a breton crazy cat’s lady!

Why did you start Lustik?
In French ou is u and loustic means “funny, kid…” I began it just for pleasure as a notebook, after Chercat.

How do you find stuff to post? Do you have a routine?
No routine, I… nose about!

What sites inspire you?
Tankthinks, Väskust, Poculum, Notcot.org, MoCoLoco, Who killed Bambi.

What happens next?
So sorry, not to have a divining instinct!

Thanks Béatrice for unveiling yourself on Colossal. I can’t urge you strongly enough to head over to Lustik and get lost for a while.

Five Questions with Cartwheel Galaxy

Five Questions with Cartwheel Galaxy website interview

Today I’m starting a new regular feature, taking a few minutes to chat with some of the people behing the blogs and Tumblrs that I’ve found inspiring and that regularly influence what you see here on Colossal. First up is a fantastic site called Cartwheel Galaxy run by Katey Nicosia. Her broad taste in art is something to take note of and I encourage you to add her to your bookmarks.

Who are you?
I am Katey. I’m 30 years old. An artist, writer, designer, dabbler.

Why did you start Cartwheel Galaxy?
I started Cartwheel Galaxy in an attempt to somehow take inventory or perhaps keep up with all the great art and artists that I discover online. I also like to share and promote artists so I intend it for that too.

How do you find stuff to post? Do you have a routine?
There are several ways. First, I follow a lot of blogs and the bulk of the art I post is found through other blogs. I also use Flickr a lot, of course. But my favorite way to find and discover art and artists is through museums and galleries. My daily routine consists of me flipping through my blog subscriptions, picking out the stuff I’m interested and going from there. I do this every day after work.

What sites inspire you?
I’m in love with But Does It Float, JESU, Artlog, and My Love For You is another current favorite.

What happens next?
I wish I had further plans but for the time being I’m content sticking with what I’m doing. Maybe some day I’ll take it all a step further, but for now my goal is just to keep posting and sharing. :)

Thanks Katey, and head on over to Cartwheel Galaxy to see what all the fuss is about!

Seen on the Streets of Chicago, an Interview with Oak Thitayarak

Seen on the Streets of Chicago, an Interview with Oak Thitayarak street photography portraits people interview Chicago

I first stumbled onto the work of Chicago photographer and graphic designer Oak Thitayarak over on Ignant late last year. After following his Flickr stream for the past few months I decided it was time to learn a bit more about the person behind these incredibly candid and honest street portraits shot in my own backyard. Oak graciously agreed to do an interview and I’m excited to share it with you.

So how old are you, how long have you been in Chicago, do you have formal training in graphic design/photography?

I’m 26 years old. I’m of Thai heritage, but born and raised in Chicago. I’ve been drawing for as long as I can remember, but didn’t take art very seriously until I enrolled in a graphic design program at a suburban branch of the Art Institute. There I had a great photography instructor who introduced me to portraiture and street photography, and my passion for it grew from there.

Seen on the Streets of Chicago, an Interview with Oak Thitayarak street photography portraits people interview Chicago

Seen on the Streets of Chicago, an Interview with Oak Thitayarak street photography portraits people interview Chicago

How often do you get out to shoot? And how do you select your subjects, are you looking for something in particular?

I try to shoot as often as I can. Lately it’s been once a week, for the past few months. But I’ll go on a photography hiatus for months if I’m inspired and working on my graphic design or illustrations, and vice versa.

When I am out shooting and wandering the streets, I try to look for potential stories, whether it’s through the characteristics of single person, their reaction to something happening, or their relationship to the city environment. I want the audience to read my images and see a moment of life. Other times I simply collect interesting characters. To me these spontaneous portraits are like quick jokes, one look at it and you know why it’s funny, cool, or even scary.

Seen on the Streets of Chicago, an Interview with Oak Thitayarak street photography portraits people interview Chicago

Seen on the Streets of Chicago, an Interview with Oak Thitayarak street photography portraits people interview Chicago

Seen on the Streets of Chicago, an Interview with Oak Thitayarak street photography portraits people interview Chicago

Some photos suggest you’re asking permission to take a photo, and in others they seem oblivious to your presence. How do you approach each photo?

This depends on the situation. If someone seems approachable, I’ll ask to take their photo, maybe have a conversation, and move on. And surprisingly, 9 out of 10 people actually don’t mind having their photo taken, you just have to approach them the right way. I also like creating scenes that feel more natural as opposed to asking strangers to pose for me. This usually starts when I see someone unique walking down the street. I enjoy the challenge of considering the background, where the subject will be placed in that environment, lighting, catching them in perfect motion, all calculated within a split second. And with a little bit of luck, I’ll have something worth sharing.

Have you ever offended anyone?

Haha, this is the most common question I get asked, and the short answer is yes. The thing is, I like working up close, very close. And believe it or not, the majority of the time people have no idea I was ever even there. On occasion they’d respond with the death stare, followed by a few hilarious words. Some have asked why I’m taking pictures of them, and I’d tell them the truth, it’s for my art. The fact is, we’re on public streets and it’s not illegal, maybe obtrusive at times, but I’m not hurting anyone. I do believe there are ethics to this, and I’m not out to ruin anyone’s day. If I feel I’ve bothered someone, or they tell me they don’t want to be photographed, out of respect I would delete picture right after. But most simply don’t care.

Seen on the Streets of Chicago, an Interview with Oak Thitayarak street photography portraits people interview Chicago

Seen on the Streets of Chicago, an Interview with Oak Thitayarak street photography portraits people interview Chicago

Your series of homeless people made the rounds on quite a few blogs recently, including this one. Can you talk a bit about how that project came about?

I was first introduced to portraits of street people by my photography teacher. During that class, one of our assignments was to go out and get portraits of people we didn’t know, and that was the first time I attempted these portraits. I find these individuals extremely captivating. What I love most is the way their stories seem to be written on their face and hands, but it’s more than skin deep. Over time, the Walk On By series became about not judging a book by its cover. Not everyone fits in a stereotype, and this applies to the judgment of people in general. Understanding kills ignorance, and that’s what I hope people get out of those images.

Any upcoming projects?

I’m a huge fan of cinematography. I often watch films to study how stories are expressed visually. Recently I’ve been trying to blend that look with my street photography. With this style I rely on strong cinematic composition, and heavy use of colors to convey mood. My scenes are still documentations of everyday life, just seen and expressed more artistically. Now if I can find a way to combine the sounds of life on the streets to these still images, my mission would be complete. So keep an eye out for that in the future.

Seen on the Streets of Chicago, an Interview with Oak Thitayarak street photography portraits people interview Chicago

A huge thanks to Oak for taking his time to share his work with Colossal. If you’d like to learn more head over to www.oakt.net.