Tag Archives: kids

The Nameless Paint Set: An Alternative Way of Understanding Color





As companies like Crayola dream up more inventive and brandable colors for their crayons like “inchworm” or “mango tango,” a young designer duo from Japan created this alternative way of exploring colors by doing away with names altogether. Nameless Paints are a set of 10 paint tubes designed by Yusuke Imai and Ayami Moteki that replace more familiar color names (which can be a tad more ambiguous, see: “jazzbery jam!”) with visual depictions of the primary colors magenta, yellow, and cyan mixed inside. The visual labeling system also relies on proportion to depict more or less of different colors to create additional shades of green, orange, or blue.

“By not assigning names to the colors we want to expand the definition of what a color can be, and the various shades they can create by mixing them,” says Imai.

While using written names may ultimately prove more useful (and more fun) in the long run, Nameless Paints are a fun way to explore how color works. The design originally won a 2012 Kokuyo Design Award, and has undergone refinements over the last few years. The set finally go on sale in October of 2015 in Japan for roughly $15. (via Spoon & Tamago)

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Artist Recreates Childhood Scribbles as Digital Illustrations Over 20 Years Later


Here on Colossal we’ve seen an artist who collaborated with her 4-year-old daughter, transforming her random sketches and scribbles into fully realized artworks. With another take on the child/adult collaborative art genre, Dutch muralist Telmo Pieper did something similar, instead collaborating with his 4-year-old self in his series called Kiddie Arts. The artist took old childhood sketches which he then recreated as digital illustrations by applying realistic light, color, and texture to the hilariously deformed shapes he imagined in his youth.

You can see much more of Pieper’s work on his website and Tumblr. He also collaborates with artist Miel Krutzmann as part of Telmo Miel out of Rotterdam. (via Bored Panda, Laughing Squid)







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Motion Silhouette: An Interactive Shadow Picture Book

Motion Silhouette is an interactive Japanese children’s book by Megumi Kajiwara and Tathuhiko Nijima that includes pop-up silhouettes in-between pages. As a light source is directed toward either side, a different moving image is projected on the page to help tell the story. Fun! Motion Silhouette is a sequel to an earlier book by the duo titled, simply, Silhouette. The books are made to order by hand (for about $60), and you can inquire through their website. (via KYOT∆®)









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This 45-Piece Wooden Sushi Set Will Make Kids Dream of Sushi



There are many wooden sushi sets out there for kids but this one, created by Japanese design firm plaplax, takes the cake. Or more appropriately, the fish. It consists of 45 wooden pieces that help teach kids about shari (the bite-sized vinegar rice) and neta (the fish topping). Kids can rearrange the shari and neta to create their own culinary masterpiece. The set was originally created for a kid-friendly exhibition last year, but you can now buy your very own “tsumiki sushi”. They’re going for 7,400 yen a pop and if you order before July 2014 your meal will ship in August. (syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Unearth the Secrets of the Green Kingdom with the ‘Plants’ App from Tinybop



You might remember an awesome app mentioned here a few months ago from the creative team over at Tinybop called The Human Body. The educational app takes you deep inside the, erm, bowels of the human body using artwork from illustrator and designer Kelli Anderson. Less than a year later we get to see the latest addition to Tinybop’s Explorer’s Library series, Plants.

The educational title lets you explore two interactive dioramas (forest and desert) illustrated by Marie Caudry where you learn about the lifecycle of plants and how they interact with the rest of the world. Tundra and grassland biomes coming soon.

Tinybop also invited Anderson back in a partnership with Daniel Dunnam to create this paper stop motion short to promote Plants. Download the app here here. (via Colossal Swissmiss)

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“Not Available on the App Store” Stickers Remind Us There Isn’t an App for Everything







Three Hyper Island students (Caio Andrade, Rafael Ochoa, and Linn Livijn Wexell) dreamed up the idea of making “Not Available on the App Store” stickers as a friendly reminder to get kids away from the screen and into the real world. Stickers are available for purchase or you can make your own. Purchased!

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DreamWorks Special Effects Artist Transforms His Son into a Superhero


Just when you think you’ve mastered every filter and editing technique when making a video of your kid chewing on Legos and pulling the cat’s tail, DreamWorks special effects artist Daniel Hashimoto arrives to trump us all. On his YouTube channel Action Movie Kid Hashmito bestows his son James with superhuman abilities and gives him gadgets of every child’s wildest imagination. Here are five of my favorites but you can see more here. (thnx, Jess!)

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