Tag Archives: kinetic sculpture

Dizzying New Wind-Powered Kinetic Sculptures by Anthony Howe

Dizzying New Wind Powered Kinetic Sculptures by Anthony Howe kinetic sculpture

Kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe (previously) has created a number of new kinetic artworks since we featured his work here last year. The artist works with specialized software to first mockup each piece digitally before fabricating the individual components from metal. The motion you see is generated completely by the wind, with even the slightest breeze setting the dozens of rotating components in action. You can see more of his recent work on his YouTube channel.

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DIY Kinetic Origami Sculpture Designed by Jo Nakashima

DIY Kinetic Origami Sculpture Designed by Jo Nakashima paper origami kinetic sculpture

Partially inspired by Erik Åberg’s interlocking kinetic cube system Ghostcubes, Brasil-based origami artist Jo Nakashima created a method for building a similar object using a system of 40 paper cubes. For those of you ambitious enough to give it a try he shared a set of instructions on Instructables. Just 45 steps!

If you’re not familiar with Nakashima, he runs the most popular instructional origami channel on YouTube, with some of his videos racking up over 13 million views. (via Instructables)

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A mesmerizing pendulum wave demonstration with 16 bowling balls in a North Carolina forest

A mesmerizing pendulum wave demonstration with 16 bowling balls in a North Carolina forest video physics math kinetic sculpture

If you’ve ever been to a science museum or taken a physics class, you’ve probably encountered an example of a pendulum wave. This video shows a large-scale pendulum wave contraption built on private property in the mountains of North Carolina, near Burnsville. The mechanism relies on 16 precisely hung bowling balls on a wooden frame that swing in hypnotic patterns for a cycle of about 2 minute and 40 seconds. Via Maria Ikenberry who filmed the clip:

The length of time it takes a ball to swing back and forth one time to return to its starting position is dependent on the length of the pendulum, not the mass of the ball. A longer pendulum will take longer to complete one cycle than a shorter pendulum. The lengths of the pendula in this demonstration are all different and were calculated so that in about 2:40, the balls all return to the same position at the same time – in that 2:40, the longest pendulum (in front) will oscillate (or go back and forth) 50 times, the next will oscillate 51 times, and on to the last of the 16 pendula which will oscillate 65 times.

Because the piece is outdoors, a number of factors prevent the balls from precisely lining up at the end, but it’s still easy to get the idea. In a perfectly controlled environment you get something like this.

Update: The pendulum was built by Appalachian State University teacher and artist Jeff Goodman.

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Dancing Shadow Sculptures by Dpt. and Laurent Craste [Updated]

Dancing Shadow Sculptures by Dpt. and Laurent Craste [Updated] shadows projection porcelain light kinetic sculpture ceramics

Dancing Shadow Sculptures by Dpt. and Laurent Craste [Updated] shadows projection porcelain light kinetic sculpture ceramics

Parade is an interactive art installation concevied by ceramacist Laurent Craste and digital agency Dpt. for the Chromatic festival in Montreal. At first glance the piece looks rather mundane: two misshapen porcelain vases sit atop a pedestal inside a wood cube, lit from above by an industrial light. But move the light and suddenly the magic happens as shadows projected from the vases animate to life. What a fun piece.

Update: Of course things like this are never as simple as they appear. Dpt. explains further that the animated “shadows” are coming from a hidden projector which tracks the movements of the faux light source. We’ve been tricked! But I suppose that’s kind of the point.

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New Bird & Butterfly Flip Book Machines by Juan Fontanive

New Bird & Butterfly Flip Book Machines by Juan Fontanive kinetic sculpture installation flipbook device butterflies birds automata

Artist Juan Fontanive (previously) constructs perpetually looping flip book machines that depict flying birds lifted from audubon guides and illustrations of butterflies. Part film and part sculpture, almost every aspect of the flip books are assembled by hand from the minutely toothed gears, clips, nuts, bolts, wormwheels and sprockets to the carefully screen printed imagery. Of the curious devices Gild Williams remarked, “Fontanive’s artworks seem strangely possessed, producing curiously moving animals that are neither living nor dead, or creating ghostly systems which seem to float mid-air and follow a pace and logic of their own.” You can see much more of his work over at Riflemaker.

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Theo Jansen’s Walking ‘Strandbeest’ Sculptures Available as 3D Printed Toys

Theo Jansens Walking Strandbeest Sculptures Available as 3D Printed Toys kinetic sculpture 3d printing

Theo Jansens Walking Strandbeest Sculptures Available as 3D Printed Toys kinetic sculpture 3d printing

Theo Jansens Walking Strandbeest Sculptures Available as 3D Printed Toys kinetic sculpture 3d printing

Theo Jansens Walking Strandbeest Sculptures Available as 3D Printed Toys kinetic sculpture 3d printing

Artist Theo Jansen has created several 3D printed models of his famous walking sculptures called Strandbeests. There are currently four different models and two alternate propeller attachments for added Strandbeest goodness. Available over at Shapeways.

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A Kinetic Sculpture Creates the Illusion of a Rotating Head

A Kinetic Sculpture Creates the Illusion of a Rotating Head perception optical illusion kinetic sculpture

I’m digging this kinetic sculpture by Swiss artist Markus Raetz (previously) that creates the illusion of a rotating head using a series of silhouettes cut from metal panels. Most of Raetz’s work involves aspects of perception and illusion, more of which you can see here. (via Sploid)

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