kintsugi

Posts tagged
with kintsugi



Art

Street Kintsugi: Artist Rachel Sussman Repairs the Roads with Gold

February 23, 2017

Christopher Jobson

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #01 (New Haven, Connecticut),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust.

As part of an ongoing series titled Sidewalk Kintsukuroi, artist Rachel Sussman (previously) brings the Japanese art of kintsugi to the streets. We’ve long been enamored by the ancient technique that traditionally involves the process of fixing broken pottery with a lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, resulting in an a repair that pays homage to the object’s history. In the same way, Sussman’s kintsugi series highlights the history under our feet, bringing attention to the imperceptible changes that take place over time in the world around us. Though even the repairs are impermanent and will eventually be lost to wear and tear.

Several photos from Sidewalk Kintsukuroi are currently on view as part of the Alchemy: Transformations in Gold at the Des Moines Art Center through through May 5, 2017. (via Hyperallergic)

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #09 (SoHo, New York),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust.

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #02 (MASS MoCA),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust

 

 



Art

Shattered Porcelain Fragments Fused With Gold by Artist Yeesookyung

June 21, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches, all images via Locks Gallery

Korean artist Yeesookyung masterfully produces imperfect sculptures, bulbous yet elegant works composed from mismatched porcelain. The series, titled “Translated Vase,” was first inspired by the Korean artisan tradition of destroying porcelain works that are not deemed pristine, and she has continued to make the fused pieces since 2001. Intrigued by these tossed aside works and shards, Yee began saving fragmented tea cups and pots rejected by contemporary masters. Honoring the works’ dismantled states, she traces each crevice in 24-karat gold leaf in the style of Japanese kintsugi, merging the unwanted works together in a way that heightens the beauty of their distress. In this way she blends diverse methods to form a contemporary process that evokes both the elegant designs of her homeland and the delicate rebuilding of damaged works in Japanese tradition.

Yee received her undergraduate degree and MFA in painting from the National University in Seoul. She is represented by Kukje Gallery in Seoul, Locks Gallery in Philadelphia, and Ota Fine Arts in Tokyo. This spring she was in the group exhibition “Earth, Fire, and Soul – Masterpieces of Korean Ceramics” at the Grand Palais in Paris. You can see more works from her Translated Vase series on her website.

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2014, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 71 x 35 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2014, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 71 x 35 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

 

 



Art Craft

Artist Mimics Japanese ‘Kintsugi’ Technique to Repair Broken Vases with Embroidery

April 28, 2016

Christopher Jobson

top

Brighton-based artist Charlotte Bailey was fascinated by the traditional Japanese mending technique called kintsugi, where a broken ceramic object is repaired with gold, silver or platinum, to accentuate the damage and ‘honor’ its history. In this interpretation, Bailey utilizes an embroidery method to reassemble a broken vase—a sort of hybrid between kintsugi and darning with a beautiful result. She first wraps each broken piece in fabric and then uses gold metallic thread to painstakingly patchwork the pieces together. While the process isn’t meant to make the vase functional again, it does produce a striking sculptural object. We’d love to see many more of these. You can follow more of her embroidery work on Facebook.

Update: Artist Zoe Hillyard has been using a similar technique to create ceramic patchwork since 2010.

kintsugi-1

kintsugi-2

kintsugi-3

kintsugi-4

kintsugi-5

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Brick Man