landscapes

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Photography

A Photographic Series of Miniature Faux Fur Landscapes Examines the Myth of the Wild West

March 15, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Waterfall

At first glance, Areca Roe’s photographic series, ‘O Pioneer,’ seems to depict placid vistas of the American West, not dissimilar to what might be seen on a vacationing friend’s Instagram. But on closer examination, Roe’s images are actually miniature scenes, with faux fur comprising the textured landscapes.

The Minnesota-based artist shares with Colossal that she was inspired by photographers who captured persuasive images of the West in the late 1800s, and whose work “helped propel the problematic narrative of Manifest Destiny, but also solidified support for national parks.” She continues, “My photographs are clearly a simulation, a farce, with the fake fur as a reference to the lure of potential bounty as well as the resulting devastation.” You can see more of Roe’s work on her website. She also has created limited edition prints of ‘O Pioneer,’ which are available in her Etsy shop. (via Colossal Submissions)

Badlands

Windmill

Canyon

Lagoon

Coal Mine

Passenger Pigeons

Forest

 

 



Art Photography

Long Exposure Photos Capture the Light Paths of Drones Above Mountainous Landscapes

March 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Reuben Wu creates images that reveal an alien splendor in natural and manmade landscapes across the globe. Previously he has explored the brilliant blue rivers of molten sulfur in Indonesian volcanoes, and photographed the thousands of glistening mirrors that compose Nevada’s SolarReserve. For his ongoing series Lux Noctis, the Chicago-based photographer utilizes modified drones as aerial light sources, illuminating obscure landscapes in a way that makes each appear new and unexplored.

Recently Wu has evolved his process of working with the drones to form light paths above topographical peaks in the mountainous terrain. “I see it as a kind of ‘zero trace’ version of land art where the environment remains untouched by the artist, and at the same time is presented in a sublime way which speaks to 19th century Romantic painting and science and fictional imagery,” said Wu to Colossal.

The light from his GPS-enabled drones create a halo effect around some of the presented cliffs and crests when photographed using a long exposure. An elegant circle of light traces the flight of the drone, leaving a mark only perceptible in the resulting photograph. You can see more of Wu’s landscape photography on his Instagram and Facebook. (via Faith is Torment)

Update: A book of Wu’s photo series will be published in Fall 2018 and is available for preorder.

 

 



Art

Dina Brodsky Chronicles Her Travels in Detailed Miniature Landscape Paintings

February 9, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Painter Dina Brodsky (previously) records travel memories from long distance bicycling trips in small circular oil paintings. Brodsky’s style channels the heightened realism of 19th century landscape painters; whereas the historical paintings were created on enormous canvases that echoed the vast American landscape, Brodsky’s contemporary take condenses the visual impact into a token-sized work that fits in the palm of a hand. The artist describes the intention and scale of her work:

I like to think that the reason my works have gotten so tiny over the years is that painting itself is partially an act of meditation, of being able to hold something still enough in my mind that I can capture an image of it. As it becomes easier to slip into that meditative state, the object I need to concentrate on becomes smaller.

Paintings from this series are on view until March 4th in the show Cycling Guide to Lilliput at Pontone Gallery in London. Brodsky also shares her work on Instagram, and offers prints of select paintings in her Etsy shop. (via Create! Magazine)

 

 



Photography

San Francisco Shrouded in Dense Fog Captured by Michael Shainblum

December 19, 2017

Christopher Jobson

In a relentless pursuit to capture the frequently shifting weather patterns of the San Francisco Bay Area, photographer Michael Shainblum (previously) has stalked scenic outlooks around the city for close to a decade. The city is especially famous for dense fog and low-lying stratus clouds that roll in almost daily during the summer, resulting in the surreal scenes he loves to photograph and film. Shainblum shares in a statement about the ongoing body of work:

The Fog in the bay area feels like it has a mind of its own. The fog can often times disturb a beautiful sunny day and cover the sky with darkness. There are mixed feelings about the fog, many residents finding it a huge inconvenience and depressing. Where as many residences embrace the fog and its erratic behavior. Regardless of how the fog is perceived from below. It’s hard to ignore just how incredible it looks from above. This series is a tribute to the incredible fog and a showcase of its magnificent beauty. Fog has essentially become a living breathing entity in San Francisco.

You can see more of his Symphony of Fog series on his website and by following him on Instagram. He also occasionally teaches timelapse workshops and sells prints of his best shots.

 

 



Art Photography

New Finnish Landscapes Captured Within Jars by Christoffer Relander

November 17, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Christoffer Relander (previously) uses double exposure photography to “capture” wooded Finnish landscapes inside of glass jars. These images give a peek into the photographer’s past, while also metaphorically preserving the memories he formed as a childhood growing up in the south of Finland.

“Reality can be beautiful, but the surreal often absorbs me,” said Relander in an artist statement on his website. “Photography to me is a way to express and stimulate my imagination. Nature is simply the world. With alternative and experimental camera techniques I am able to create artworks that otherwise only would be possible through painting or digital manipulation in an external software.”

The new series is a follow-up to his black and white project Jarred & Displaced which was recently exhibited at the Finnish Cultural Institute in Madrid. You can view more of Relander’s wooded images on his Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Art

Landscapes and Geometric Shapes Intersect in New Paintings by Mary Iverson

November 8, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Windmills, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Using a combination of oil and acrylic paint, ink, and found photographs, Seattle-based artist Mary Iverson (previously) investigates the relationship between humans and their environment in her landscape overlay paintings. Iverson builds worlds where dramatically angled, brightly colored geometric shapes are caught in webs of competing perspective lines and grids, superimposed over otherwise tranquil scenery.

Iverson described her work to Amadeus Magazine: “In following my interests and working to resolve an artistic dichotomy within myself, between my love and nature and my fascination with the shipping industry, I came upon a visual solution that metaphorically echoes what we are facing in the world today.”

These paintings are included in Correspondence, her exhibition with Scott Albrecht at Andenken Gallery in Amsterdam, NL. The show opens on November 11. You can also see more of Iverson’s finished and in-progress works on Instagram.

Fort Bourtange, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Amsterdam, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Summer Triangle, Crater Lake National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas 2017

Shipwreck, Yosemite National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas, 2017

Shipwreck, Mount Rainier National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas 2017

 

 



Art Photography

Artist Yang Yongliang Imagines the Bleak Effects of Industrialization in Dense Photographic Collages

November 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Yang Yongliang, Endless Streams, 2017. Single Channel 4K video, 7’00”, © Yang Yongliang / Courtesy Galerie Paris-Beijing

In these stark photographic collages that seem to possess the infinite density of a fractal, artist Yang Yongliang (previously) questions unchecked industrialization, the impact of climate change, and pressing social issues in his native China. Each image seems to suggest a post-apocalyptic future where the forces of urbanization collide with the natural world, creating a drab black and white dystopia. “The artist keeps developing a critic approach to reality while searching for a spiritual source in his country’s relentless march between technological progress and annihilation,” states Galerie Paris-Beijing.

As part of this new series titled Time Immemorial, Yongliang began with a series of digital collages that were printed in negative on fine art paper. Each piece was then photographed with a traditional film camera and prints were developed by hand. Lastly, the artworks are mounted on back-lit wooden cases to fulfill the artist’s intent to preserve digital imagery on photographic film.

Time Immemorial opens at Galerie Paris-Beijing on November 4, 2017.

Sinking, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 100 x 80 cm

Flooding, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 100 cm

The Cliff, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 80 cm

The Path, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 80 cm

The Streams, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 100 x 80 cm

The Flock, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 100 cm