Tag Archives: leaves

Impressive Crocheted Leaf Sculptures by Susanna Bauer

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art-photographers.co.uk

To truly appreciate the delicacy of Susanna Bauer‘s leaf sculptures, think of crunching a dead leaf in your hand, how it disentigrates into dust with the slightest effort. To work with dry and fragile leaves as a medium for crochet seems nearly impossible, but Baur somehow manages it with ease, turning leaves into cubes, tunnels, and geometric patterns with techniques that might be more appropriate for durability of leatherwork. She shares about her process:

There is a fine balance in my work between fragility and strength; literally, when it comes to pulling a fine thread through a brittle leaf or thin dry piece of wood, but also in a wider context – the tenderness and tension in human connections, the transient yet enduring beauty of nature that can be found in the smallest detail, vulnerability and resilience that could be transferred to nature as a whole or the stories of individual beings.

Bauer has a new exhibition of work at Lemon Street Gallery in Cornwall, England through June 27th, and you explore a bit more on Facebook

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Skeletal Leaf Bowl Sculptures by Kay Sekimachi

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While attending school at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, artist Kay Sekimachi was struck by a quote from her teacher Trude Guermon-prez: “Try to make something with the simplest of means.” Over the span of her sixty-year art career Sekimachi took the words to heart as she rose to the forefront of contemporary fiber art in the 60s and 70s by creating challenging artworks with extremely limited means. Leaves, hornet’s nest paper, grass, shells, and linen constitute many of the materials in Sekimachi’s repertoire. Via the Smithsonian:

Sekimachi uses the loom to construct three-dimensional sculptural forms. In the early 1970s she used nylon monofilament to create hanging quadruple tubular woven forms to explore ideas of space, transparency, and movement. Inspired by her ancestral homeland of Japan, Sekimachi repeatedly returns to that ancient culture for ideas.

Among her more recent works are these delicate bowls made from maple leaf skeletons. The pieces are held together with the help of Kozo paper and special coatings of both watercolor and Krylon. Several of the works will be on view at the Bellevue Arts Museum starting July 3, along with an exhibition of work by her late husband, renowned America woodturner Bob Stocksdale. (via My Modern Met)

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Delicate Pressed Fern Leaf Illustrations by Helen Ahpornsiri

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Artist and illustrator Helen Ahpornsiri creates incredible pressed fern illustrations from her studio in East Sussex. Tiny bits of stems and leaves are arranged on paper to create butterflies, dragonflies, and birds scarcely larger than a coin. Many of her pieces are available as prints on Etsy (along with a few originals), and you can also follow her on Instagram. (via The Kid Should See This)

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Leaf Beasts: Simple Animal Sculptures Cut from Dried Magnolia Leaves

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Leaf Beast is a recent project by freelance illustrator and artist Baku Maeda that seemingly brings dead leaves back to life. Maeda took advantage of the warped shape and veiny structure of dried magnolia leaves and made only minimal cuts to create each piece. See Part I and Part II. (via Laughing Squid, Lustik)

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A Spider Fixing a Leaf

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OK, so the spider isn’t fixing the leaf, but that doesn’t make it any less amazing (and no, it’s not Photoshop). Paris-based photographer Bertrand Kulik stumbled onto this tiny spider who managed to construct its web inside a leaf with a giant hole and snapped these photos at just the right angle. (thnx, Alex!)

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Stitched Leaves by Hillary Fayle

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I’m really enjoying these stitched leaved by artist Hillary Fayle who is currently working on a MFA in Craft/Material studies at the Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. We’ve seen many different artists working with leaf cuttings (which Fayle does as well), but this aspect of suspended embroidery is pretty special. You can see more examples on her website, and custom pieces are available on request. Photos by Natalie Hofert Photography. (via Lustik)

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Ethereal Woven Metal Leaf and Seed Installations by Michelle Mckinney

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U.K. artist Michelle Mckinney examines the contrast of manmade materials with forms of nature in her ethereal installations of leaves, seeds, and butterflies formed from handcut woven metal. The artist cuts each shape from copper, brass, or steel mesh which is then colored and assembled into the forms seen here. You can see more of her work over on Facebook and in her portfolio. (via Colossal Submissions)

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