Tag Archives: leaves

The Phenomenon Of “Crown Shyness” Where Trees Avoid Touching 

Photo © Dag Peak. San Martin, Buenos Aires.

Crown shyness is a naturally occurring phenomenon in some tree species where the upper most branches in a forest canopy avoid touching one another. The visual effect is striking as it creates clearly defined borders akin to cracks or rivers in the sky when viewed from below. Although the phenomenon was first observed in the 1920s, scientists have yet to reach a consensus on what causes it. According to Wikipedia it might simply be caused by the trees rubbing against one another, although signs also point to more active causes such as a preventative measure against shading (optimizing light exposure for photosynthesis) or even as a deterrent for the spread of harmful insects. (via Kottke, Robert Macfarlane)

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Crocheted Lace Jewelry Inspired by Organic Specimens 

Japanese artist Miho Fujita crochets delicate sculptures of organic matter found in forests, turning handmade leaves, berries, and clusters of mushrooms into wearable objects. The works are all created from naturally dyed cotton, Fujita using plants to both inspire and dye her jewelry. You can see more of her crocheted works on her FacebookInstagram, and online store. (via Lustik)

    

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Dried Leaves Crocheted into Delicate Sculptures by Susanna Bauer 

All photographs by art-photographers.co.uk

At the intersection of thread, leaves, and her steady hands, artist Susanna Bauer (previously here and here) produces miraculous little sculptures that fuse the natural world with the handmade. Her crocheted embellishments stitched into dry leaves introduce unusual patterns or create hybrid “assemblages” of multiple fragments, and at times she adds elements that appear almost naturally occurring.

Bauer says she creates the works as a tribute to nature but also as a mirror to ourselves. “I’m interested in the way we relate to each other, how we are connected and what moves us,” she shares, “what we hold close and what we send out, how our own inner tenderness can give us strength and how every being is beautiful in its individuality and in its dialog with others.”

All of the pieces seen here are part of a new solo exhibition titled Connections that opened today at
Le Salon Vert Gallery in Switzerland.

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Fragile Crocheted Leaf Sculptures by Susanna Bauer 

Adornment Vl. 29 H x 21 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn. All photos courtesy art-photographers.co.uk.

Adornment Vl. 29 H x 21 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn. All photos courtesy art-photographers.co.uk.

Working with the rigid edges of large dried magnolia leaves artist Susanna Bauer (previously) adds tiny crocheted embellishments of cotton yarn to create fascinating sculptures that marry the natural and artificial world. The fragility of the medium alone—dry leaves—is enough to cause a double take when first encountering these tiny interventions, and a closer look reveals near perfection in Bauer’s stitching, a near Herculean effort in patience. Many of her pieces are almost shockingly intentional, as if the plants had naturally grown this way, while others are more playful, featuring additions or subtractions that reorganize a regular leaf in unexpected ways.

Seen here are all new sculptures created in the last few months. Bauer currently has work on view in her exhibition titled Leaf Works at The Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World through May 26, and will be showing new artworks starting next week at Muriel Guépin Gallery in a show called Natural Order. You can see more on her website.

Aligning. 34.2 H x 26.5 W x 7 D cm. magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Aligning (side view). 34.2 H x 26.5 W x 7 D cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Aligning. 34.2 H x 26.5 W x 7 D cm. magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Aligning (side view). 34.2 H x 26.5 W x 7 D cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Centered. 38 H x 38 W cm. Platanus leaves, cotton yarn.

Centered. 38 H x 38 W cm. Platanus leaves, cotton yarn.

Four Circles. 38 H x 38 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Four Circles. 38 H x 38 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Inner Circle. 35.8 H x 25.8 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Inner Circle. 35.8 H x 25.8 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Inner Circle, detail.

Internal Workings. 35.8 H x 22 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn.

Internal Workings. 35.8 H x 22 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn.

Moon Vlll. 35.8 H x 22 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn.

Moon Vlll. 35.8 H x 22 W cm. Magnolia leaf, cotton yarn.

Moon VIII, detail.

Moon VIII, detail.

Resurgence ll. 38.9 H x 34.8 W x 3.2 D cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Resurgence ll. 38.9 H x 34.8 W x 3.2 D cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Resurgence l, detail.

Resurgence l, detail.

Trans-Plant No.19. 40.2 H x 40.2 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Trans-Plant No.19. 40.2 H x 40.2 W cm. Magnolia leaves, cotton yarn.

Susanna in her studio, photo by Rebekah Taylor.

Susanna in her studio, photo by Rebekah Taylor.

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New Pressed Fern, Algae, and Gold Leaf Illustrations by Helen Ahpornsiri 

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Artist Helen Ahpornsiri (previously) continues to explore the possibilities of pressed plantlife in her ongoing series of wildlife illustrations that depict insects, animals, and other creatures. The England-based artist has recently begun experimenting with gold leaf that she applies to ferns and then incorporates as accents into various pieces. You can see more on her website, on Instagram, and through her shop. (via the Instagram Blog)

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New Embroidered Leaves by Hillary Fayle 

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Artist Hillary Fayle (previously) continues her exploration of embroidered plantlife using elegent stitching to create amalgams of leaves and seeds. Ginkgo leaves and maple tree seeds are sutured into tight geometric forms, while other pieces play with negative space as Fayle deftly cuts patterns and shapes directly into them. The plants are coated in a non-toxic preservative to both protect the artwork and ensure the brittle materials are more resistant to tearing. Seen here is a collection of Fayle’s work from the last year or so, but you can explore more on her website and on Instagram.

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