Tag Archives: light

Photomontages That Trace Light Through Overgrown Countrysides and Abandoned Interiors 

"Thicket" (2015)

“Thicket” (2015), all images © Suzanne Moxhay

Artist Suzanne Moxhay produces photomontage scenes which seem to effortlessly combine elements from both her own photography practice and her large archive of collected images. To compose her taken and collected photographs, Moxhay relies on a film technique dating back to the early 20th century called matte painting, a process where backdrops are illustrated on glass panels and integrated into live-action sets. Using this method she creates the illusion that all of her disparate pictures are one cohesive image, first arranging the fragments on glass, then re-photographing the new configuration, and finally touching up the compositions digitally.

“In my recent work I have been exploring concepts of spatial containment in montages built from fragments of photographed and painted interiors,” says Moxhay. “Architectures are disrupted by anomalous elements – contradictory light sources, faulty perspective, paradoxes of scale. Light casts shadows in the wrong direction, walls fail to meet in corners, an area of the image can be seen either as an enclosing wall or dark overcast sky.”

Moxhay lives and works in London. You can see more of her photomontage scenes on her website. (via ArtistADay)

Eventide (2012)

“Eventide” (2012)

"Arch" (2016)

“Arch” (2016)

"Antechamber" (2014)

“Antechamber” (2014)

"Feralis" (2011)

“Feralis” (2011)

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Dazzling Images of Glowing Flowers Photographed With Ultraviolet-Induced Visible Fluorescence 

28-year-old photographer Craig Burrows photographs plants and flowers using a type a photography called UVIVF or “ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence.” If you haven’t heard of it, that’s not a surprise, as it is a relatively unknown process which brings out the glowing fluoresce in plant matter through the use of high-intensity UV lights.

Typically UV is removed through a camera’s lens, however Burrows photographs with a 365nm LED light which is passed through a filter to transmit only UV and infrared light. The dazzling plant life Burrows’ photographs absorbs this UV light and releases visible light at different wavelengths, which allows him to capture colors far more vivid than those seen in a typical viewing condition.

Although Burrows has limited his photography to singular flowers and small arrangements, his next step is aimed at illuminating entire scenes, like gardens, glades, and greenhouses, with 100-watt floodlights. You can see more of the Southern California-based photographer’s glowing plant portraits on his Flickr and portfolio site. (via Colossal Submissions)

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The Timeless Beauty of Vintage Aerolux Light Bulbs Containing Floral Filaments 

From the 1930s through the 1970s, Aerolux Light Corporation produced these amazing novelty light bulbs that contained sculptural filaments in the shape of flowers, birds, and myriad other designs that would illuminate in different colors. The bulbs contained a mixture of neon or argon (or both) and some of the components were coated with phosphors to achieve different color effects. Via Wikipedia:

Aerolux gas discharge light bulbs contained low pressure gas, either neon or argon, or a mixture of the two. Also within the bulb were metal sculptures coated with phosphors. These phosphors fluoresced when excited by glow discharge. Because glow discharge occurs readily at 110-120 volts AC, one could use these bulbs in standard household lamps in the United States.

The phosphors used in the bulbs were somewhat brittle, necessitating care in handling. Shaking or jarring the bulbs would cause flaking and migration of the phosphors to other parts of the metallic sculpture. Such handling would leave non-fluorescing portions of the sculpture and/or migration of phosphors to other surfaces within the bulb.

At the height of production some of the bulbs sold for a mere .20 cents, but can now fetch hundreds of dollars on Ebay or Etsy. If you happen to be in New York you can see a bonafide Aerolux bulb that’s on permanent display at MoMA as part of an artwork by artist Dan Flavin. (via Neatorama, Geyser of Awesome, Oddity Central)

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Dan Flavin, Roses. Aerolux Flowerlite light bulb, ceramic flower pot, cord and light switch. 8 1/2 x 5 1/4″ (21.6 x 13.3 cm). Courtesy MoMA.

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Photographer Andreas Levers Captures the Hazy Glow of Unpopulated Streets at Night 

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Since 2013, photographer Andreas Levers has been photographing solitary landscapes at night, capturing the streets, train platforms, and gas stations that are rarely populated in the late evening hours. Each image is haunted by an eerie glow, scenes dotted by bursts of artificial illumination. The Potsdam-based artist is a media designer by day, whose spare time is spent focusing his camera on the stark architectural elements that surround him. You can see more images from Levers’ At Night series on his website and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Scribbled Rainbow Light Paintings of Dinosaurs and Other Creatures by Darren Pearson 

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We’ve long been fans of LA-based photographer Darren Pearson (previously) who heads out at night to create site-specific light sculptures using long-exposure photography. He mostly uses a device of his own creation called a Night Writer to illustrate almost all of the creatures you see here, from rainbow-hued dinosaurs swimming across lakes to his popular skeletons that were incorporated into a music video. You can follow his work day-to-day on Instagram.

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A New Dancing Light Sculpture by Akinori Goto 

Media artist Akinori Goto (previously) just shared another version of his kinetic light sculpture depicting a series of animated dancing figures. The framework of the sculpture is 3D printed from data of silhouettes traced from an actual dancer, creating a sort of modern-day rotoscoping effect. When illuminated with a bright light, a cross-section of the sculpture is revealed. Goto hopes to soon obtain a patent for the device. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

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