long exposure

Posts tagged
with long exposure



Photography

Vivid Rainbow Roads Trace Illuminated Pathways Across Forests and Beaches

June 6, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Daniel Mercadante has a slate of unique films under his belt, made in partnership with his wife Katina, as The Mercadantes, including Ball and Breathe. More recently, Daniel has been exploring the still image in a colorful series called Rainbow Road. The Mercadantes were based in California for many years, but after a move to rural Connecticut, Daniel looked for a way to add some warmth to the chilly blue hour during the Northeast’s long winters.

Using long exposure photography and a  custom built lighting rig covered in colored gels, the process of creating the images is surprisingly simple: the roads are created by Daniel running around with the lighting rig. No other post-production manipulation occurs, other than basic color and exposure balancing. The photographer explains to Colossal, “after so many years focused on the moving image, I’ve struggled with singularly caught moments in still imagery—so I love how this project still requires images to be captured over 15sec-1 minute, so in some way they require the same passages of time that a shot in one of our short films might.”

In addition to their Connecticut Rainbow Roads (which Daniel divulges may have a distant relation to the Mario Kart pathways of his youth) the Mercadantes have taken this colorful project to Guatemala, where local kids chose the photo shoot locations. Daniel reports that they hope to continue traveling with their low-tech, high-color Roads. You can see more from the Mercadantes on Instagram and Vimeo.

 

 



Photography

Swirling Star Trails Captured Over the Namib Desert by Daniel Kordan

May 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Russian photographer Daniel Kordan is a master of photographing the cosmos. In 2016 we covered his journey to the Salar de Uyuni, where he captured millions of brilliantly hued stars reflected in the world’s largest salt flat. Recently, Kordan returned from a trip to Namibia where he mapped swirling trails of stars above the Deadvlei, a white clay pan speckled with the 900-year-old tree skeletons, and other sites across the Namib desert.

The images feature vortexes of multi-colored stars streaked across the sky like post-impressionist paintings. The Milky Way’s warm and cool tones intermix to create a kaleidoscopic vision of the sky above, and illuminate the barren desert landscape below. To capture such images yourself, Kordan suggests creating a time lapse with a wide angle lens, and utilizing an app like PhotoPills which allows you to easily predict the position of the stars.

You can see more of Kordan’s exploration through Namibia in the images below, and view his photographs from other locations across the globe on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Photography

Long Exposure Photos Capture the Light Paths of Drones Above Mountainous Landscapes

March 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Reuben Wu creates images that reveal an alien splendor in natural and manmade landscapes across the globe. Previously he has explored the brilliant blue rivers of molten sulfur in Indonesian volcanoes, and photographed the thousands of glistening mirrors that compose Nevada’s SolarReserve. For his ongoing series Lux Noctis, the Chicago-based photographer utilizes modified drones as aerial light sources, illuminating obscure landscapes in a way that makes each appear new and unexplored.

Recently Wu has evolved his process of working with the drones to form light paths above topographical peaks in the mountainous terrain. “I see it as a kind of ‘zero trace’ version of land art where the environment remains untouched by the artist, and at the same time is presented in a sublime way which speaks to 19th century Romantic painting and science and fictional imagery,” said Wu to Colossal.

The light from his GPS-enabled drones create a halo effect around some of the presented cliffs and crests when photographed using a long exposure. An elegant circle of light traces the flight of the drone, leaving a mark only perceptible in the resulting photograph. You can see more of Wu’s landscape photography on his Instagram and Facebook. (via Faith is Torment)

Update: A book of Wu’s photo series will be published in Fall 2018 and is available for preorder.

 

 



Photography

The Night Skies Over Finland & Iceland Saturated with Stars Photographed by Mikko Lagerstedt

September 14, 2017

Christopher Jobson

We’ve long been drawn to self-taught photographer Mikko Lagerstedt’s (previously) dreamy composite photos of Finland and Iceland at night. In his long-exposure images, meteors are seen streaking through the sky and frigid waterfalls appear like mist. Lagerstedt composes and edits all of his images in Lightroom and Photoshop and shares numerous tutorials on his techniques through his website. He most recently returned from a photoshoot at a deserted Yyteri Beach in Finland, more of which he shared on Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Sunburn: Long Exposure Photographs With Markings Burned by the Light of the Sun

April 26, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Sunburned GSP#552( Mojave/ expanding), 2012. 8″x10″ unique gelatin silver paper negative. Private collection.

Photographer Chris McCaw uses the power of the sun to burn markings into his photographs, destroying small areas to appear like the sun itself. McCaw stumbled upon the technique for his series Sunburn after forgetting to close the shutter during an all night exposure. The light of the morning sun destroyed his efforts from the night before, reversing the tonality of the work in a way that has inspired McCaw to continue to experiment with injuring the surface of the photograph.

“The subject of the photograph (the sun) has transcended the idea that a photograph is simple a representation of reality, and has physically come through the lens and put it’s hand onto the final piece,” said McCaw in an explanation of the series. “This is a process of creation and destruction, all happening within the the camera.”

The resulting image from McCaw’s technique shows the landscapes he photographs with a burnt hole or streak where the sun appeared overhead. Often McCaw will combine several works to showcase the sun’s movement—charred dots or a thick line marking its arched path.

Currently McCaw’s Sunburn series is included in his solo exhibition Times and Tides at San Francisco-based Haines Gallery. You can view more images from his Sunburn series on his website. (via Juxtapoz)

Sunburned GSP#202 (SF Bay/expanding), 2008. 16″x20″ unique gelatin silver paper negative. Collection of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. All images via Chris McCaw.

Sunburned GSP#839 (Every 30 minutes, Arctic Circle, Alaska), 2015. Four 4”x10” unique gelatin silver paper negatives. Private collection

Sunburned GSP#288 (Pacific Ocean), 2008. 11″x14″ unique gelatin silver paper negative. Private collection

Sunburned GSP #676( San Francisco Bay), 2013. 8″x10″ unique gelatin silver paper negative.

 

 



Photography

A Stunning View of the Northern Lights over Iceland Reflected in a Volcanic Crater Lake

March 7, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Last month photographer Sigurdur William camped out at the edge of the Kerid volcanic crater lake in Iceland where he captured this unusual view of the Northern lights and stars reflected on the water’s surface. Located in southern Iceland the Kerid is one of many crater lakes in the area that are frequented by locals and tourists alike, some of which visit through William’s photography tour business ArcticShots. (via Astronomy Picture of the Day)

 

 



Photography

This Long-Exposure Photo Captures Marin County in a River of Fog Lit by a Full Moon

September 9, 2016

Christopher Jobson

fog

Two weeks ago in the middle of the night, Italian photographer Lorenzo Montezemolo climbed Mt. Tamalpais in Marin County, California and waited for what he knew would be the perfect conditions for a spectacular long-exposure photograph. As the fog slowly rolled by he opened his shutter for three minutes, long enough for the full moon above to illuminate the surreal landscape you see here. The resulting image is nothing short of phenomenal.

“I chose to use a long exposure in order to give the incoming fog a smooth, striated appearance as it slithered over the ridge below,” Montezemolo shares with Colossal. “For the past year I’ve been crossing the Golden Gate Bridge several times a week to photograph the beautiful landscapes, seascapes and fog of Marin County, just north of San Francisco.”

You can see much more of Montezemolo’s photography on Flickr, and Instagram.

 

 

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