Tag Archives: machines

Meditating Machinery: Mechanical Buddhas and Other Religious Icons by Wang Zi Won

Meditating Machinery: Mechanical Buddhas and Other Religious Icons by Wang Zi Won religion machines kinetic sculpture

Meditating Machinery: Mechanical Buddhas and Other Religious Icons by Wang Zi Won religion machines kinetic sculpture

Meditating Machinery: Mechanical Buddhas and Other Religious Icons by Wang Zi Won religion machines kinetic sculpture

Meditating Machinery: Mechanical Buddhas and Other Religious Icons by Wang Zi Won religion machines kinetic sculpture

Meditating Machinery: Mechanical Buddhas and Other Religious Icons by Wang Zi Won religion machines kinetic sculpture

Meditating Machinery: Mechanical Buddhas and Other Religious Icons by Wang Zi Won religion machines kinetic sculpture

Meditating Machinery: Mechanical Buddhas and Other Religious Icons by Wang Zi Won religion machines kinetic sculpture

Meditating Machinery: Mechanical Buddhas and Other Religious Icons by Wang Zi Won religion machines kinetic sculpture

South Korean artist Wang Zi Won constructs intricate mechanical figures of Buddha and bodhisattva that appear to be lost in meditation or enlightenment. The electrically-powered figures are fused with numerous mechanical components which at times resemble halos or lotus flowers and simultaneously move the humanoid figures through repetitive motions (see videos above). The artist says his intention is to examine a future where humans and technology merge, something he views in a particularly positive light. Via Shin Seung-ho of Dukwon Gallery:

The artist predicts that in the future humans will evolve and adapt themselves to enhanced science and technology just as men and animals in the past evolved to adapt themselves to their natural circumstances. He sees this future as our destiny, not as a negative, gloomy dystopia. His work is thus based on neither utopia not dystopia. Wang represents the relations between man, technology and science through the bodies of cyborgs.

The artist considers it important to escape from human bondage in order to achieve harmony between men and machines. He thinks this harmony can be achieved through the process of religious practices and spiritual enlightenment. In Buddhism, the Bodhisattva of Compassion helps people attain enlightenment, Arhat is a spiritual practitioner of asceticism, and Buddha is a being who reaches the highest level of enlightenment. Through them, the artist intends to follow the path of enlightenment, breaking away from anxiety, agony, and pain. The artist has no intention to emphasize religious connotations through these Buddhist icons but to reflect his own or our own existence between utopia and dystopia.

While it may be difficult to grapple with the artists intentions I find the figures and their motions to be really quite beautiful and indeed meditative, somewhat reminiscent of the robots used in Chris Cunningham’s amazing All is Full of Love video for Bjork. If you have some patience (the site loads quite slowly) there are many more examples of Wang’s work and several more videos over on his blog and you can learn more at Art Nova and Hanmi Gallery.

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The Page Turner: A New Rube Goldberg Machine from Joseph Herscher

The Page Turner: A New Rube Goldberg Machine from Joseph Herscher Rube Goldberg machines machines kinetic sculpture automated

The Page Turner is the latest device from New York born, New Zeland raised, and Brooklyn-based kinetic artist Joseph Herscher who builds elaborate Rube Goldberg machines that use complex chain reactions to complete mundane tasks. Some of Herscher’s effects here are subtle in their brilliance. He often creates small loops where his devices refer back to earlier steps, for instance the final state of step 25 is also used again as part of step 30. You can see more videos of his ingenious work here. (via automata, junk culture)

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The Chromatic Typewriter

The Chromatic Typewriter typewriters painting machines device chromatic

The Chromatic Typewriter typewriters painting machines device chromatic

The Chromatic Typewriter typewriters painting machines device chromatic

Washington-based painter Tyree Callahan modified a 1937 Underwood Standard typewriter, replacing the letters and keys with color pads and hued labels to create a functional “painting” device called the Chromatic Typewriter. Callahan submitted the beautiful typewriter as part of the 2012 West Prize competition, an annual art prize that’s determined by popular vote. I don’t know how practical painting an image with a color typewriter is, but if Keira Rathbone can do it… (via dark silence in suburbia)

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Music from a Dry Cleaner

Music from a Dry Cleaner objects music video machines

Music from a Dry Cleaner objects music video machines

Music from a Dry Cleaner objects music video machines

Sound designer and composer Diego Stocco (warning: lots of sound) continues his ongoing project of making music from uncommon objects and places with this new video using loops recorded from a local dry cleaner. Stocco has also made music from a tree, from sand, and even a a bonsai, among others. Of all of them I really think this is his finest. Make sure you make it past the 2:10 mark. (via neatorama)

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Jesse Houlding’s Magnetic Drawing Machines

Jesse Houldings Magnetic Drawing Machines sculpture magnets machines drawing machines drawing

Jesse Houldings Magnetic Drawing Machines sculpture magnets machines drawing machines drawing

Jesse Houldings Magnetic Drawing Machines sculpture magnets machines drawing machines drawing

Jesse Houldings Magnetic Drawing Machines sculpture magnets machines drawing machines drawing

Jesse Houldings Magnetic Drawing Machines sculpture magnets machines drawing machines drawing

Jesse Houldings Magnetic Drawing Machines sculpture magnets machines drawing machines drawing

Jesse Houldings Magnetic Drawing Machines sculpture magnets machines drawing machines drawing

Over the past several years Oakland-based artist Jesse Houlding has created a variety of incredible kinetic drawing devices using magnets and iron fillings. As a series of magnetic components move in various patterns behind the paper, the iron fillings leave a gradual residue that reveals a visual representation of the magnetic field holding them in place. Houlding says that he is interested in the accumulation of marks, specifically how time is evidenced in artwork and the relationship between process and end-results. You can see a couple more videos of his machines on his Youtube channel. Thanks Jesse for sharing your work with Colossal!

If you liked this check out the work of Sandy Noble, Eske Rex, and Harvey Moon.

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The Ridiculous Pool: Spraypaint Skateboarding

The Ridiculous Pool: Spraypaint Skateboarding youth street art skateboarding painting machines

The Ridiculous Pool: Spraypaint Skateboarding youth street art skateboarding painting machines

The Ridiculous Pool: Spraypaint Skateboarding youth street art skateboarding painting machines

Based on some of the comments I saw on Twitter and Facebook it seems a few were a bit upset by this morning’s post about Dtagno’s train graffiti device. To swing the vandalism/art pendulum back in the other direction check out D*Face’s Ridiculous Pool Paint Attack where a couple of skateboarders use remote controlled spraypaint cans mounted to the base of their decks to create an enormous spirograph in an empty swimming pool. (via neatorama)

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Hacked Typewriter

Hacked Typewriter typewriters sculpture machines electronics

Hacked Typewriter typewriters sculpture machines electronics

Hacked Typewriter typewriters sculpture machines electronics

Hacked Typewriter typewriters sculpture machines electronics

Graphic designer Paul Bailey is a recent graduate of Kingston University in London and his portfolio is filled with lots of fun projects including beautifully designed infographics, these fun biscuit stamps, and even an idea for a tribute bell installed outside recently closed pubs. Most interesting to me though was his hacked typewriter. Beginning with the statement, “the beauty of the typewriter is that, unlike its modern counterpart, it cannot be hacked” (which I couldn’t locate a source, but sure, I’ll roll with it) he set out to redefine the fundamental mechanics of the typewriter resulting in a new interpretation of its core function. Is it useful? Not really. But I find the idea of hacking non-electronic devices to create bizarre new machines really intriguing.

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