Tag Archives: math

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum: Large Format Photos of Chalkboards from Quantum Mechanics Institutions by Alejandro Guijarro science quantum mechanics math chalk

Momentum is a project by artist Alejandro Guijarro who spent three years traveling to the quantum mechanics departments of Cambridge, Stanford, Berkeley, Oxford and elsewhere to shoot large format photographs of blackboards just after lectures. Completely removed from the context of a classroom or laboratory and displayed in a gallery, the cryptic equations from one of the most formidable branches of physics become abstract patterns of line and color. Via the artist’s statement:

Before he walks into a lecture hall Guijarro has no idea what he will find. He begins by recording the blackboard with the minimum of interference. No detail of the lecture hall is included, the blackboard frame is removed and we are left with a surface charged with abstract equations. At this stage they are documents. However, once removed from their institutional beginnings the meaning evolves. The viewer begins to appreciate the equations for their line and form. Colour comes into play and the waves created by the blackboard eraser suggest a vast landscape or galactic setting. The formulas appear to illustrate the worlds of Quantum Mechanics. What began as a precise lecture, a description of the physicist’s thought process, is transformed into a canvas open to any number of possibilities.

Guijarro graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2010 with a MA in fine art and now lives
and works in both London and Madrid. He’ll have work later this year at PhotoEspaña. (via Not Shaking the Grass)

The Beauty of Mathematics: A Visual Demonstration of Math in Everyday Life

The Beauty of Mathematics: A Visual Demonstration of Math in Everyday Life video art math

This lovely video short from Yann Pineill and Nicolas Lefaucheux of Paris video production agency Parachutes succinctly demonstrates the underlying mathematics behind everyday occurrences in the format of a triptych. On the left we see the mathematical equation, in the middle a mathematical model, and on the right a video of such things as snowflakes, wind, sound, trees and magnetism. The video begins with the following quote:

“Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music.” —Bertrand Russell

Best viewed full screen. (via Laughing Squid)

A Wooden Domino Tree by Qiu Zhijie

A Wooden Domino Tree by Qiu Zhijie wood trees math installation dominoes

A Wooden Domino Tree by Qiu Zhijie wood trees math installation dominoes

A Wooden Domino Tree by Qiu Zhijie wood trees math installation dominoes

A Wooden Domino Tree by Qiu Zhijie wood trees math installation dominoes

The Small Knocking Down the Big is a 2009 installation by Chinese artist Qiu Zhijie made from hundreds of cut wooden dominoes meant to loosely demonstrate the effects of something that has become known as Domino Magnification (if you really, really enjoy physics see the recent work of J. M. J. van Leeuwen). The basic premise is that any domino can knock over another domino that’s roughly 1.5 times larger, meaning that if you gently pushed a normal sized domino into a chain of bricks that increase in size each time by 1.5, the 32nd object will be large enough to topple the Empire State Building. In the video example above it takes only 13 dominoes starting with an object the size of a bean to knock over a 100 lb. slab!

Zhijie’s installation is somewhat less mathematical and more visual, but the same mathematical principles hold true. Participants are invited to knock over the smalles dominoes at the outer branches of the installation which eventually gain enough momentum to knock over the thicker blocks at the trunk. (via lustik)

Sum Times: Clever Mathematical Street Art from Aakash Nihalani

Sum Times: Clever Mathematical Street Art from Aakash Nihalani windows street art math doors

Sum Times: Clever Mathematical Street Art from Aakash Nihalani windows street art math doors

Sum Times: Clever Mathematical Street Art from Aakash Nihalani windows street art math doors

Sum Times: Clever Mathematical Street Art from Aakash Nihalani windows street art math doors

Sum Times: Clever Mathematical Street Art from Aakash Nihalani windows street art math doors

I’m loving this series of simple, non-destructive interventions by artist Aakash Nihalani (previously) who is widely known for his observational street art involving neon-colored tape in various geometric forms. Nihalani opens a solo show starting January 12th, 2013 at Jonathan LeVine. (via arrested motion)