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Art

The Coralarium: An Immersive Sculptural Installation Semi-Submerged in the Indian Ocean

July 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photographs shared with permission of the artist Jason deCaires Taylor

The Coralarium is the newest aquatic sculpture by artist Jason deCaires Taylor (previously here and here). Built in a large developed coral lagoon in the Maldives, the semi-submerged installation is positioned so both human and marine visitors can interact with sculptural elements on the skyline, inter-tidal waterline, and seabed.

To reach the Coralarium, island guests traverse about 500 feet (150 meters) of shallow water, seascaped with underwater poplars and endemic corals. About 20 feet (6 meters) tall, the open-air stainless steel cube is designed based on natural coral structures and allows tidal water and marine life to pass through. Within the structure, which provides some refuge from the ocean’s currents, are several figurative sculptures that merge human, plant, and coral shapes, based on endemic species of the island and its surrounding reefs. Additional sculptures sit and stand atop the cube’s roof to unite the interior elements with the horizon.

The aquatic destination is accessible via small group tours led by marine biologists that are on staff at the Fairmont Maldives Sirru Fen Fushi resort. You can see more of Taylor’s work on Facebook and Instagram, and the video below shows the creation of the Coralarium. (via Web Urbanist)

 

 



Art

A Multi-Story Metallic Splash Sculpture by Pere Gifre Drops Through the Center of a Madrid Hotel

July 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For the last 15 years artist Pere Gifre has specialized in producing water-based sculptures through a process linked to visual effects engineering. His technique transforms the natural movements of water into works imbued with its natural form, allowing the sculptures to remain “alive” despite their metal composition.

The most recent installation by the San Francisco-based artist is an 80-foot waterfall that cascades down the center of the VP Plaza España Hotel in Madrid. The metallic multi-level drip descends from the hotel’s 12th floor glass bottom pool into the atrium below with a dramatic splash. Lighting is projected onto the work, shifting the silver sculpture through several colors throughout the day.  You can see a video tour of the included installation on Youtube, and browse some of Gifre’s small-scale gastronomy-inspired pieces on his website.

 

 



Art

Tommie Smith’s Iconic Protest Salute Immortalized in Gold by Glenn Kaino

June 25, 2018

Andrew LaSane

Starting in 2013, Los Angeles-based conceptual artist Glenn Kaino has had the opportunity to meet and collaborate with a man whose act of protest had long inspired him. “Bridge” is Kaino’s 100-foot long construction featuring two hundred casts of former American track and field runner and Olympic gold medalist Tommie Smith’s arm, which he raised as a human rights salute during the National Anthem after taking gold at the 1968 Summer Olympics. Kaino’s work will be installed as a part of a larger exhibition at the High Museum in Atlanta in fall 2018. We spoke with the artist to learn more about how his collaboration with Smith came to be.

On the podium of the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico, African American medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos went from being top-performing athletes representing the United States to legendary activists with a simple yet powerful gesture. The photograph of Smith and Carlos with their heads lowered and their leather-clad fists raised is one of the most iconic images of the 20th century, and Kaino tells Colossal that it is one that he used to have taped to the side of his iMac.

A friend of Kaino’s noticed the picture and referred to Tommie as “Coach Smith,” revealing that he knew the former athlete from his days as track coach. The friend set up the meeting, and Kaino soon found himself at Coach Smith’s home in Atlanta, watching tape of the race in slow motion as Tommie broke it down almost frame by frame. “I didn’t have a pitch,” Kaino said of the way he finally approached the topic of collaboration with the gold medalist and his wife, “but I did have an observation.” He noticed that Tommie Smith’s home was like a “time bubble,” with memorabilia and references to his career and to his most famous moment. Kaino says that as someone who was born after the salute, the image has always been symbolic, but for the Smiths it was personal. “You shook my hand with that arm, you brush your teeth with that arm,” he said to Tommie.

Through the conversation, Kaino convinced Tommie to collaborate on a project that would remove the icon (the arm) from his body and help him see the salute the way that others do. Back in Los Angeles, after experimenting with what Kaino believes to have been the arm of an Aquaman figure, they got to work casting Smith’s arm and clenched fist. He used the cast to create hundreds of fiberglass arms, which he then painted gold and hung from wires to form, according to the artist’s website, “a golden path leading forward from the present but connected to the past, a spectacular reconciliation of a historic record, an individual memory, and a public symbol all renegotiated in an infrastructure of time to creates stories of the now.”

As for connecting the past and present, it is interesting to consider Kaino’s work and Smith’s salute as it relates to Black athletes today, like Colin Kaepernick, who are criticized for publicly protesting similar issues 50 years later. Kaino tells Colossal that he is working on a documentary to tell Smith’s story that goes deeper than the one image that everyone knows. For those who want to see “Bridge” in person, the exhibition, titled With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith, opens in Atlanta, Georgia at the High Museum on September 29, 2018. (via Artnet)

Smith and Kaino hosted drawing workshops in educational spaces around the country where students learned the history of the event and drew frames from the momentous race.

Smith and Kaino hosted drawing workshops in educational spaces around the country where students learned the history of the event and drew frames from the momentous race.

 

 



Art

The Magnetic Force of Urs Fischer’s Life-Size Metallic Rhinoceros

May 29, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Robert McKeever. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Robert McKeever. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

Things stands poised as the singular sculpture in a new installation by Swiss artist Urs Fischer, yet like its title might suggest, the lone work is composed of several disparate parts. At the piece’s core stands a life-size aluminum copy of a rhinoceros with a magnetic presence that has attracted several man-made objects into its grand orbit. A vacuum cleaner, step stool, toilet, car door, and frying pan all cling to its wrinkled metallic skin.

The work questions one’s attraction to and use of everyday objects, considering how and what we accumulate as we move through our individualized worlds. “‘Art’ has always been a word for this thing that can’t be rationalized, when you see or hear something that you struggle to explain,” says Fischer in a press release about Things. “But that’s its strength, of course.”

The massive aluminum work is on view at a disused bank at 511 Fifth Avenue in midtown Manhattan through June 23, 2018. This installation coincides with Fischer’s exhibition of new paintings titled Sōtatsu, which also runs through June 23 at Gagosian Gallery's 980 Madison Avenue location. (via The New York Times)

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

 

 

 



Art

New Architectural Sculptures by David Moreno Appear As Three Dimensional Drawings

March 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Spanish sculptor David Moreno (previously) continues to blur the lines between two and three dimensions with his architectural artworks. Created using hundreds of steel rods and lengths of piano wire, Moreno’s sculptures take the shape of buildings, and his more recent works have ventured indoors, highlighting interior details like doorways and staircases. In 2017, the artist also created a large, immersive installation in the United Arab Emirates titled “Connecting Doors.”  Moreno shares his work on Instagram and Behance.

 

 



Art

Hollow Animal Sculptures Constructed From a Network of Metal Branches by Kang Dong Hyun

February 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Korean artist Kang Dong Hyun constructs hollow animal sculptures from a system of metallic branches. His works often have a high concentration of these sprig-like elements constructing the animal’s face, which allow the distinguishing characteristics of his house cats, birds, bulls, and elephants to take form. In one particular piece a lion’s full facial features are brought to life through his network of sculpted twigs, a furrowed brow projecting a look of worry or remorse. You can see more of Kang’s interpretations of the animal kingdom on his Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art Design Science

Precise Metallic Replicas of Ancient Fossils and Cells by Allan Drummond

January 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Cell Division

By day, D. Allan Drummond is Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at The University of Chicago, where he runs the Drummond Lab. After hours, his interest in evolution and cellular structure takes a different, tangible form. Drummond constructs exacting replicas of creatures from the deep fossil record, paying specific attention to the detail of their underbellies, which are often obliterated by the passage of time. Drummond shares with Colossal:

So far, as a scientist, I’ve been on a slow journey to the bottom, to the deepest level of detail, from seeking to explain patterns of evolution spanning the tree of life, to probing how cells react to their environment, to tinkering with the pieces and parts of molecules swarming inside those cells. The details go all the way down, remaining absorbing and also consequential, worth knowing about and studying. That sensation of unexpectedly interesting detail is what I try to capture in my sculpture.

Each creature is sculpted digitally by Drummond using scientific references, including specimens from private collections. Next, they are 3D printed in wax, and finally lost-wax cast in bronze and finished by hand. The sculptures are rendered down to the smallest detail, including gills, antennae, legs, and even mitochondria in cell division. Drummond shares his in-progress and completed pieces on Instagram and several works are available for sale on his website as jewelry or decorative artifacts.

Trilobite, Ceraurus Species

Trilobite, Ceraurus Species

Trilobite, Ceraurus Species

Trilobite, Ceraurus Species

Trilobite, Ceraurus Species

Sphinx Moth, Hyles Lineata

Sphinx Moth, Hyles Lineata

Sphinx Moth, Hyles Lineata

Trilobite, Hoplolichas Furcifer, in process

Trilobite, Hoplolichas Furcifer