Tag Archives: metal

Otherworldly Metal Organisms Welded by Mylinh Nguyen 

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Inspired by animalistic forms both living and extinct, artist Mylinh Nguyen welds alien creatures from brass, bronze, and silver. Using a variety of machining techniques each creature takes form over several weeks, originating first as haphazard sketches in a notebook before evolving into permanent metal forms. Nguyen is a master of articulating even the most minute skeletal details of imaginary beings with metal, such as her seed-pod-meets-jellyfish series Meduses or her 2012 series of aquatic life, Sous-Marins. Nguyen currently has several pieces on view at the Les 3 CHA centre d’art in Châteaugiron, France. (via Lustik)

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Welded Insects Produced From Salvaged Metal Scraps by John Brown 

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Gathering spare pieces of metal, John Brown assembles his findings into sculptures of colorful butterflies, insects, and birds. Although the assemblages are formed from salvaged materials like nails and bicycle chains, the pieces somehow remain delicate, wings appearing just as thin as a butterfly’s own. After welding each piece together, Brown finishes the sculpture by painting the wings with oil paint, accurately copying the markings of specific species such as the Holly Blue and Red Admiral butterflies.

The Wales-based sculptor has lived in the rural west of his country for the past eight years, inspired by the fauna-rich valleys that compose the region. You can see more of his metal insects and other welded figures on his Facebook and Etsy page. (via Lustik)

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Kujira Carbon Steel Knives Mimic the Form of Whales 

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Designed by blacksmith Toru Yamashita in Japan’s Kochi-prefecture, these high carbon steel knives are designed in the form of five different whales, the blades forming the baleen mouth of each species. The Kujira blades were originally made for children as a tool for sharpening pencils or cutting paper, but have since been marketed abroad as a general purpose utility or chef knife. At about $50 each the knives aren’t cheap, but it appears the whale shape is strangely perfect for small hands and with the right care they would probably last a lifetime. Some of the models are available through Hand-Eye Supply, but it looks like a few are sold by Yoshihiro Cutlery on Amazon. (via Core77, Attics of my Life)

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Blowtorch Filigree: Lace Patterns Delicately Cut from Industrial Steel Objects by Cal Lane 

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Gutter Snipes, 2011, Courtesy Art Mur

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Gutter Snipes, 2011, Courtesy Art Mur

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Gutter Snipes, 2011, Courtesy Art Mur

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Car Bombing, 2007, Courtesy Art Mur

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Car Bombing, 2007, Courtesy Art Mur

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Car Bombing, 2007, Courtesy Art Mur

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Car Bombing, 2007

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Veiled Hood #2, 2014, Couresy Art Mur

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Veiled Hood #3, 2014, Couresy Art Mur

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Ammunition Box, 2011, Courtesy Art Mur

Cal Lane works in a series of “Industrial Doilies”, producing works that use contradiction to create an empathetic form. Lane imparts highly industrial materials with touches of delicacy, adding filigree to car parts, oil tanks, and shovels with a blowtorch. Her chosen patterns also exist on another level, their compositions inspired by those used in religious ceremonies such as weddings, christenings, and funerals.

Lane’s use of lace simultaneously hides and exposes the materials in which she chooses to work, revealing and covering up tough materials with delicate pattern. Through this notion, Lane also institutes a sense of humor explaining, “Like a Wrestler in a tutu, the absurdity of having opposing extremist stances is there for reaction and not rational understanding; the rational discussion arises in the search for how one thing defines the other by its proximity.”

Lane has studied painting, welding and sculpture and holds an MFA in Sculpture from the State University of New York. She exhibits works with galleries internationally including ones located in Montreal, Santa Monica, and New York City. All images here courtesy Art Mur.

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Bolt Poetry: A Blacksmith Evokes Surprisingly Human Forms from Single Steel Bolts 

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Oslo-based blacksmith and photographer Tobbe Malm manages to create unusually emotional sculptures using old bolts. The series began when Malm stumbled onto the rusting bolts at a barn in Bergsladen, Sweden. He immediately recognized the wide caps and slender stems as having humanistic qualities so he gathered them up and proceeded to heat, forge, twist and bend them into shape in his studio. The resulting collection of sculptures titled Bolt Poetry, evokes humanistic moments of affection, sadness, and pain. You can see more of his work on Behance. (via Lustik)

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Scientists Develop Hydrophobic Metal That Causes Water to Bounce 

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Researchers at the University of Rochester’s Institute of Optics led by professor Chunlei Guo have developed a new type of hydrophobic surface that is so highly water repellent, it causes water droplets to bounce off like magic. Unlike earlier hydrophobic surfaces that rely on temporary (and slowly degrading) chemical coatings such as teflon, this new super-hydrophobic surface is created by etching microscopic structures into metal with the help of lasers. Potential applications include airplane wings that resist icing, a whole new type of rust proofing, or even a toilet that wouldn’t require water. Watch the video above to see the surface in action, and you can read Guo’s research paper here. (via Sploid)

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