Tag Archives: miniature

Miniature Treehouse Sculptures Built Around Houseplants by Jedediah Voltz 

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LA-based artist Jedediah Corwyn Voltz constructs miniature treehouses wrapped around common houseplants or bonsai trees in his new sculptural series titled Somewhere Small. Voltz relies on over a decade of commercial prop making for film and other projects to craft each structure from scratch using small bits of wood, silk fabric, miniature artworks, and semi precious stones that are hidden throughout. To-date he’s produced some 25 little habitats that resemble everything from tiny watchtowers in secluded forests, to large bustling windmills or water wheels.

The pieces you see here will be on view at Virgil Normal in LA starting April 23. (thnx, jake!)

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Tiny Ink Drawings Scaled to the Size of Pencils, Fingers, and Matchsticks by Christian Watson 

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All images courtesy of Christian Watson (@1924us)

Christian Watson, illustrator and owner of 1924, posts images to Instagram multiple times a day, pictures that showcase his cross-country adventures, vintage cameras, and sporadically his own miniature ink drawings that are often less than a half an inch tall. The tiny illustrations seem to mimic the rustic adventures found in his photographs—pulling in log cabins, lighthouses, and animals that teeter on the tip of his pencils or crawl to the top of his fingers. Take a look at more of Watson’s hand lettering and micro illustrations on his Instagram. (via Arch Atlas)

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New Fantastical Miniature Flying Machines Forged From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag 

"The Pilot" (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Pilot” (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

Melbourne-based Daniel Agdag (previously here and here) produces fantastical models of machines as a way to explore his own daydreams of what may be lurking inside our most basic structures, the machinery kept hidden under steel or concrete. Agdag wants to draw attention to the complexity of the everyday, highlighting the gears and systems deep inside the objects that make our lives more convenient. Agdag builds these imagined contraptions from cardboard rather than metal, meticulously constructing the objects to appear much more durable than their actual materials suggest.

“Aesthetically, the driving force behind the creation of works I make stem from a need to see and imagine objects, machines and environments in a way I’d like to see them, to imagine how I think they work and expose their inner workings,” said Agdag. “All too often, the most amazing feats of human engineering are kept hidden and disguised under shiny facades or reinforced concrete.”

The flying vessels are also inspired by Agdag’s mother who migrated alone from Europe to Australia. The sculptures romanticize the feeling of being alone in the sky, unsure of what adventures may come. “I think of the airships as a vehicle to escape with, an attempt to cross a divide, to be the captain of my own journey,” said Agdag.

Agdag’s last exhibition was the group exhibition “Model Urban” at Manningham Art Gallery in Australia last fall, and he showed work with MARS Gallery at Sydney Contemporary Art Fair last September. You can see more of his detailed cardboard sculptures and in-progress works on his Instagram.

"The Pilot" (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Pilot” (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

"The Pilot" (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Pilot” (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

"The Editor" (2015), boxboard, paper, mounted on wooden base (Victorian Ash) under low iron glass, 30 x 30 x 65 cm (including glass vitrine)

“The Editor” (2015), boxboard, paper, mounted on wooden base (Victorian Ash) under low iron glass,
30 x 30 x 65 cm (including glass vitrine)

"The Editor" (2015), boxboard, paper, mounted on wooden base (Victorian Ash) under low iron glass, 30 x 30 x 65 cm (including glass vitrine)

“The Editor” (2015), boxboard, paper, mounted on wooden base (Victorian Ash) under low iron glass,
30 x 30 x 65 cm (including glass vitrine)

"The Southerly" (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Southerly” (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

"The Northerly" (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Northerly” (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

"The Northerly" (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Northerly” (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

"The Hunted" (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Hunted” (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

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New Highlights from Artist Tatsuya Tanaka’s Daily Miniature Photo Project 

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Japanese art director Tatsuya Tanaka (previously) continues to entertain us with his ongoing miniature photo project, now stretching into its fifth year. Tanaka uses office supplies, food, and other found objects that he utilizes as set pieces or backdrops for miniature inhabitants. You would think his desire to continue the project would diminish after surpassing 1,000 photos or that his imagination would be completely tapped, but that’s clearly not the case. You can see new images from the Miniature Calendar project every single day on Instagram and Facebook.

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Miniature DIY Paper Skeleton Kits by Tinysaur 

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The folks over at Brooklyn-based Tinysaurs build DIY paper model kits of the world’s smallest dinosaurs and other skeletons, both real and fictional. Each tiny kit stands about 2 inches tall when finished and takes about 20-30 minutes to assemble with a pair of tweezers. Kits are available as a standalone paper model, or as a deluxe kit with included borosilicate glass display dome. See more in their Etsy shop. (via So Super Awesome)

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You Can Now Explore the World’s Largest Train Set Using Google Street View 

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If you’re ever in Hamburg, Germany, be sure to join the million annual visitors who stop by Miniatur Wunderland, the largest continuous train set in the world. The huge train set fills several large rooms and contains over 8 miles of tracks that move 900 trains through themed dioramas of cities and other locations around the world like Scandinavia, Hamburg, Bavaria, and Switzerland. If you can’t make it Hamburg, here’s the next best thing: Google just photographed the entire thing and shared it on Google Street View so you can explore it from the perspective of a teeny tiny person.

Google recorded 9 areas of the Miniatur Wunderland system from multiple angles, and you can drop in just like on Google Maps and explore everything at a 360° angle. Watch the video below to get a better sense of how this whole thing is setup. (via Visual News)

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