Tag Archives: miniature

The Miniature Street Interventions of Slinkachu 

The Jetty 1b  - blog.jpg

Blink, and you’ll miss it. Secreted amongst weeds growing in the cracks of sidewalks or hidden in a tiny pile of trash, street artist Slinkachu creates site-specific interventions of miniature people living just under our feet. More than just hiding tiny figurines in public places, each of his artworks are carefully considered, crafted, and installed before the artist takes a photo to document it. While clearly humorous in nature, Slinkachu’s pieces touch on much larger ideas of environment, globalization, and a culture of isolation often found in large cities. Via Andipa Gallery:

These figures embody the estrangement spurred by the over-whelming nature of the modern metropolis, and incite a renewed perspective of the everyday urban experience to those who find them. This sense of isolation and melancholy, however, is accompanied by sense of irony and humour that makes Slinkachu’s commentary all the more poignant.

You can see more of his little people artworks on Instagram and at Andipa Gallery. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

slink-11

slink-2

slink-1

slink-3

slink-4

slink-5

slink-6

slink-7

slink-8

slink-9

See related posts on Colossal about , .

A Short Film Detailing the Miniature Replication of Nix + Gerber’s Post-Apocalyptic Studio 

NixGerber_06

“Library” (2007), all images via The Drawing Room

Since 2005, artist Lori Nix and partner Kathleen Gerber have been producing dioramas that depict post-apocalyptic environments, everyday scenes that give the audience a glimpse of their world once nature has been left to take over. Nearly everything within the scenes is fabricated by the two under the name Nix+Gerber, with each scene taking approximately seven months from start to the final photograph. This means that the two take approximately two photographs a year, spending the bulk of their practice on miniature reproduction.

When deciding the last piece to produce for the body of work “The City,” Nix+Gerber decided to look inward. They choose to replicate their own studio, titled “The Living Room” (2013), which Nix explains actually looks like the end of the world, a disaster scene to fit within the dystopian series. For this particular project they had to work in an extremely meta fashion, scanning each CD that sat on their shelves and reproducing an even smaller replica of a subway train car that was sitting in their studio when they started production.

“It’s the little details that really make the scene come alive,” said Nix. “The fan in the back window, the paracords going everywhere, and the little items on the table.”

Despite the fact that most of Nix’s practice is focused on creating the props for each shoot, she still labels herself as a photographer rather than sculptor. “I’m not the type of photographer that is going to go out and find things to photograph,” said Nix. “I am going to create things to photograph.”

While crafting “The Living Room,” The Drawing Room produced a short documentary about Nix+Gerber’s practice which you can see below. You can also read more about the artists’ work on their blog, and see more of their miniature scenes on their Instagram and Facebook.

NixGerber_07

“Living Room” (2013)

NixGerber_02

“Church” (2009)

NixGerber_03

“Control Room” (2010)

NixGerber_16

“Anatomy Classroom” (2012)

NixGerber_05

“Laundromat at Night” (2008)

NixGerber_08

“The Subway” (2012)

NixGerber_01

“Chinese Take-Out” (2013)

NixGerber_17

“Museum of Art” (2010)

NixGerber_04

“Beauty Shop” (2010)

NixGerber_09

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

An Historically Accurate 19th Century Photo Studio Built in 1:12 Scale 

AliAlamedy_01

All images via Ali Alamedy

Turkey-based artist Ali Alamedy had been building miniature sets for seven years when he came across documentation of Charles Miner's photography studio from the early 1900s. Inspired by the way sunlight was used to illuminate studio sets, Alamedy decided to build his own version in 1:12 scale. The project took him over nine months, using hundreds of feet of wood, and building more than 100 miniature objects designed specifically to fit the era.

Due to few images being available of photography studios at that time, Alamedy read extensively to figure out what tools, techniques, styles, and colors were used within the studios (all images were in black and white). One of the hardest challenges during the completion of the model was the camera, as each fold in the bellow in real life is just 3 cm. The final 1:12 scale camera has 124 2 mm folds that were all meticulously created by hand.

You can take a look at more of Alamedy’s miniature scenes on his Instagram and Facebook. (via PetaPixel).

AliAlamedy_09

AliAlamedy_04

AliAlamedy_12

AliAlamedy_14

AliAlamedy_07

AliAlamedy_015

AliAlamedy_06

AliAlamedy_15

AliAlamedy_03

AliAlamedy_02  AliAlamedy_11

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Miniature Treehouse Sculptures Built Around Houseplants by Jedediah Voltz 

gif2

LA-based artist Jedediah Corwyn Voltz constructs miniature treehouses wrapped around common houseplants or bonsai trees in his new sculptural series titled Somewhere Small. Voltz relies on over a decade of commercial prop making for film and other projects to craft each structure from scratch using small bits of wood, silk fabric, miniature artworks, and semi precious stones that are hidden throughout. To-date he’s produced some 25 little habitats that resemble everything from tiny watchtowers in secluded forests, to large bustling windmills or water wheels.

The pieces you see here will be on view at Virgil Normal in LA starting April 23. (thnx, jake!)

ss2

ss4

close2

ss5

ss6

gif3

close

ss11

ss12

gif5

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Tiny Ink Drawings Scaled to the Size of Pencils, Fingers, and Matchsticks by Christian Watson 

ChristianWatson_11

All images courtesy of Christian Watson (@1924us)

Christian Watson, illustrator and owner of 1924, posts images to Instagram multiple times a day, pictures that showcase his cross-country adventures, vintage cameras, and sporadically his own miniature ink drawings that are often less than a half an inch tall. The tiny illustrations seem to mimic the rustic adventures found in his photographs—pulling in log cabins, lighthouses, and animals that teeter on the tip of his pencils or crawl to the top of his fingers. Take a look at more of Watson’s hand lettering and micro illustrations on his Instagram. (via Arch Atlas)

ChristianWatson_04

ChristianWatson_10

ChristianWatson_09

ChristianWatson_08

ChristianWatson_06

ChristianWatson_05

ChristianWatson_03

ChristianWatson_02

ChristianWatson_07

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

New Fantastical Miniature Flying Machines Forged From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag 

"The Pilot" (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Pilot” (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

Melbourne-based Daniel Agdag (previously here and here) produces fantastical models of machines as a way to explore his own daydreams of what may be lurking inside our most basic structures, the machinery kept hidden under steel or concrete. Agdag wants to draw attention to the complexity of the everyday, highlighting the gears and systems deep inside the objects that make our lives more convenient. Agdag builds these imagined contraptions from cardboard rather than metal, meticulously constructing the objects to appear much more durable than their actual materials suggest.

“Aesthetically, the driving force behind the creation of works I make stem from a need to see and imagine objects, machines and environments in a way I’d like to see them, to imagine how I think they work and expose their inner workings,” said Agdag. “All too often, the most amazing feats of human engineering are kept hidden and disguised under shiny facades or reinforced concrete.”

The flying vessels are also inspired by Agdag’s mother who migrated alone from Europe to Australia. The sculptures romanticize the feeling of being alone in the sky, unsure of what adventures may come. “I think of the airships as a vehicle to escape with, an attempt to cross a divide, to be the captain of my own journey,” said Agdag.

Agdag’s last exhibition was the group exhibition “Model Urban” at Manningham Art Gallery in Australia last fall, and he showed work with MARS Gallery at Sydney Contemporary Art Fair last September. You can see more of his detailed cardboard sculptures and in-progress works on his Instagram.

"The Pilot" (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Pilot” (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

"The Pilot" (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Pilot” (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

"The Editor" (2015), boxboard, paper, mounted on wooden base (Victorian Ash) under low iron glass, 30 x 30 x 65 cm (including glass vitrine)

“The Editor” (2015), boxboard, paper, mounted on wooden base (Victorian Ash) under low iron glass,
30 x 30 x 65 cm (including glass vitrine)

"The Editor" (2015), boxboard, paper, mounted on wooden base (Victorian Ash) under low iron glass, 30 x 30 x 65 cm (including glass vitrine)

“The Editor” (2015), boxboard, paper, mounted on wooden base (Victorian Ash) under low iron glass,
30 x 30 x 65 cm (including glass vitrine)

"The Southerly" (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Southerly” (2015), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

"The Northerly" (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Northerly” (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

"The Northerly" (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Northerly” (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

"The Hunted" (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

“The Hunted” (2016), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on wooden base with hand-blown glass dome, 58.5 x 30.5 cm

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Page 1 of 111234...»