Tag Archives: miniature

A Museum Dedicated to Miniature Architectural Models Opens in Tokyo 

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Earlier this summer, Archi-Depot opened within Tokyo’s Shinagawa district, a warehouse museum dedicated to the storage and display of Japanese architectural models. Created by the company Warehouse TERRADA (previously), the cavernous space houses rows and rows of dramatically-lit miniature designs, many of which serve as the tiny precursors to some of the city’s top attractions such as the Tokyo Skytree, Tokyo International Airport, and the Asakusa Culture and Tourism Center.

Each of the models stacked within the museum’s 17-foot-tall interior contain a QR code, a feature that provides quick access to further information about the architectural works. Digital details include blueprints, photographs of the finalized building or structure, and examples of other projects the head architect has completed during their career. One architect in particular, Kengo Kuma, has been selected to design the 2020 World Olympics stadium. Although this project is still within its planning stages, a few of his completed projects’ models are stored within the museum. These works include the China Academy of Arts’ Folk Art Museum and the Asakusa cultural center mentioned above. Other architects included in the museum’s collection are Jun Aoki, Shigeru Ban, Wonderwall, Torafu, and many more as the collection is continuously expanding.

In addition to this growing permanent display, Archi-Depot also hosts rotating exhibitions of newer models or more conceptual pieces in its exhibition area. Currently the museum has an exhibition of works by Japanese architecture firm Wonderwall that will be on display through the end of the year. Last month we had a chance to visit the museum, and were blown away by the immense detail put into each of the tiny pieces, especially considering they are often stored away from the public eye. You can have a chance to browse the collection by either visiting the museum Tuesday through Sunday from 11 AM to 9 PM, or visit digitally on their website and Instagram.

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Miniature Graphite Drawings by Mateo Pizarro 

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Mateo Pizarro’s tiny graphite drawings are scarcely larger than the length of a match but contain enough detail to suggest entire stories, both surreal and terrifying. The Colombian artist refers to these as his Micro-Barroque series, and while the images shown here seem focused on the incredible detail contained in small spaces, Pizarro also explores more macabre and unsettling images in a collection of hybrid creatures titled Bestiary of Improbable Animals. You can see more of Pizarro’s work on Instagram and Behance. (via Juxtapoz)

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New Miniature Dwellings Suspended Inside Test Tubes by Rosa de Jong 

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Artist Rosa de Jong continues to explore the spacious confines of glass test tubes by erecting impossibly small buildings, trees, and other inhabitable structures inside of them. For her series titled Micro Matter the Amsterdam-based artist uses traditional model-making materials and her own handcrafted structures that she suspends inside scientific instruments. You can see some of her latest sculptures on Behance, and she may eventually start selling some of her pieces online, so be sure to signup for an alert.

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New Miniature Handmade Glass Creatures by ‘Glass Symphony’ 

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Kiev-based glass artist Nikita Drachuk of Glass Symphony (previously) continues to crank out all matter of tiny glass objects from birds and bees to slugs and salamanders. Drachuk primarily uses a technique called lampwork, where a high-temperature torch is used to melt colorful glass rods. You can see more of his work on Etsy.

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A Miniature Landscape of Elephants Carved From the Tip of a Pencil by Cindy Chinn 

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Artist Cindy Chinn (previously) recently created a commissioned work for the California-based Epiphany Elephant Museum, a miniature graphite carving of a family of elephants. The piece, titled “Elephant Walk,” features the animals on the tip of a carpenter’s pencil alongside trees that are dotted to imitate foliage. To accurately carve the minuscule materials, Chinn utilizes a magnifying lamp and trinocular microscope. If you are interested in commissioning a piece, or would like to see her other carvings, she has works for sale on her Etsy store.

You can see more images of her miniature carved works on her Facebook, blog, and website. (via Twisted Sifter)

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The Miniature Street Interventions of Slinkachu 

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Blink, and you’ll miss it. Secreted amongst weeds growing in the cracks of sidewalks or hidden in a tiny pile of trash, street artist Slinkachu creates site-specific interventions of miniature people living just under our feet. More than just hiding tiny figurines in public places, each of his artworks are carefully considered, crafted, and installed before the artist takes a photo to document it. While clearly humorous in nature, Slinkachu’s pieces touch on much larger ideas of environment, globalization, and a culture of isolation often found in large cities. Via Andipa Gallery:

These figures embody the estrangement spurred by the over-whelming nature of the modern metropolis, and incite a renewed perspective of the everyday urban experience to those who find them. This sense of isolation and melancholy, however, is accompanied by sense of irony and humour that makes Slinkachu’s commentary all the more poignant.

You can see more of his little people artworks on Instagram and at Andipa Gallery. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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