Tag Archives: miniature

A Working Balloon-Powered Paper Pipe Organ Designed by Aliaksei Zholner 


Paper engineer Aliaksei Zholner has wowed us before with his miniature V8 engine, and now brings his crafty talents to the musical realm with this working paper organ. The tiny organ has 18 functional keys that create tones with the aid of corresponding reeds, and of course a pipe organ can’t function without a steady air flow, a problem Zholner solves with a large balloon. (via Sploid)

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Miniature Narrative-Based Sculptures Created From Balsa Wood by Vera van Wolferen 

Dutch multidisciplinary artist Vera van Wolferen (previously) produces miniature balsa wood sculptures, architectural objects that are either incorporated into animations or left motionless to tell their own stories. Her static works are often displayed beneath glass bell jars, leaving the audience to imagine that the tiny tree houses, cottages, and campers are neatly contained within their own universes. Van Wolferen also uses simple craft materials like cotton to enhance her sets, making it appear as if her sculpted homes are resting amongst the clouds.

You can view more of van Wolferen’s wood sculptures and sets, as well as some of her cut paper illustrations, on her InstagramFacebook and Behance.

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Glass Insects and Plants Sculpted to Scale by Japanese Artist Yuki Tsunoda 

Molding tiny bits of soft Moretti glass with equally small tools, Japanese sculptor Yuki Tsunoda produces insects, flowers, and other types of plants at a size that is nearly to scale. Her subject matter is sparked by her interest to dissuade gut feelings of disgust when it comes to insects, and create works that highlight the beauty of their individual parts.

In addition to Moretti glass, Tsunoda achieves the metallic luminosity often found on insects’ wings and other parts of the body by incorporating dichroic glass and a form of quartz known as aventurine. You can view more of the 26-year-old artist’s miniature bugs and other scale glass works on her Twitter, or purchase one for yourself by going to her online shop. (via Spoon&Tamago)

  

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16th Century Miniature Boxwood Carvings That Fit in the Palm of Your Hand 

Photo by Craig Boyko

Carved the size of a palm or smaller, these miniature boxwood carvings featuring religious iconography from the early 16th century have long been a mystery to researchers in the field. It is believed that the entire body of work was created during a 30-year window between 1500 and 1530, somewhere in Flanders or the Netherlands.

The tiny altarpieces, rosaries, and prayer beads are each produced from a single boxwood fragment, incorporating pins smaller than a grass seed that hold the pieces together. Using micro CT scanning and Advanced 3D Analysis Software, curators and conservators of Small Wonders: Gothic Boxwood Miniatures an exhibition at The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Rijksmuseum have gained new insight into the materials and subject matter of each boxwood carving.

Small Wonders: Gothic Boxwood Miniatures will showcase AGO’s collection along with 50 other loaned pieces from other museums and private collections, including some rare carvings that have never been seen in North America. One work, the eleven-bead Chatsworth Rosary (c. 1509-1526), was owned by King Henry VIII and his wife Catherine of Aragon. You can tour the full exhibition yourself at the AGO through January 22, at the Met Cloisters on February 21, 2017, or when the exhibition makes its last stop at the Rijksmuseum on June 15, 2017.

You can also follow AGO on their journey to discovering the mystery behind the boxwood miniatures in the video below, as well as see detailed images from the entire collection on AGO’s website. (via The History Blog)

Photo by Ian Lefebvre

Photo by Craig Boyko

Photo by Ian Lefebvre

Photo by Craig Boyko

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New Miniature Hand-Thrown Ceramics and Equipment by Jon Almeda 

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We continue to be amazing by ceramic artist Jon Almeda's (previously) incredibly tiny vessels thrown by hand on a miniature clay wheel. The variety of cups, vases, bowls, and other objects are so tiny they can perch on a fingertip or rest on a coin. Almeda has also been flexing his model-building skills by constructing 1/12th replicas of a kiln and ceramic wheel for use by an architect. You can see many videos of his works in progress on his wildly popular Instagram account.

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A video posted by JON ALMEDA (@almedapottery) on

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A video posted by JON ALMEDA (@almedapottery) on

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A Miniature T-Shirt Screen Printing Rig Designed by Devin Smith 

While working for a t-shirt factory back in 2013, miniature artist Devin Smith was inspired to build a tiny replica of their studio, a project that would end up consuming 5 months of his free time but resulted in a fun gift for his employers that’s now displayed in their front showroom. Eventually Devin took the minuscule clothing idea even further by designing a fully functional miniature screen printing rig that transfers designs onto tiny clothes—Barbie doll scale, specifically. Here’s a video of it in action, and you can see more of his miniature designs on Facebook. (via The Daily Miniature)

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