Tag Archives: models

Engineer Builds a Functional Miniature V8 Engine Using Only Paper 

In a series of videos posted to YouTube, engineer Aliaksei Zholner demonstrates a miniscule V8 engine he designed that is built completely from paper (with minor bits of scotch tape to prevent friction). The engine is so tiny it fits inside the plastic container found inside a Kinder egg. In the the videos Zholner demonstrates the progress of the engine coming together over several months, and the latest clip posted this weekend incorporates a paper throttle that effectively controls the speed of the little whirring device using compressed air. You can also see his wildly popular model v6 engine from last year.

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UGEARS: Elaborate Self-Propelled DIY Mechanical Models 

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UGEARS are a series of 11 new mechnical models built from wooden pieces that spring to life with the help of rubber band engines, cranks, or with the assistance of gravity. Similar to balsa wood insects, the laser-cut pieces assemble like a puzzle without need for glue or adhesives. The most impressive design is an elaborate 480-piece steam locomotive that’s 12″ long and propels itself up and down a provided track with an internal engine.

UGEARS was designed by Kiev-based Ukrainian Gears and all of the models seen here are currently funding on Kickstarter for another 6 days.

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A 1:60-Scale Boeing 777 Built Entirely from Paper Manilla Folders by Luca Iaconi-Stewart 

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Inspired by high school architecture class where he was assigned to create simple paper models using cut paper manilla folders, San Francisco-based designer Luca Iaconi-Stewart went home to begin construction on an extremely ambitious project: a 1:60 scale reproduction of a Boeing 777 using some of the techniques he learned in class. That was in 2008, when Iaconi-Stewart was just a junior in high school.

Unbelievably, the project continues five years later as he works on and off to perfect every aspect of the plane. Relying on detailed schematics of an Air India 777-300ER he found online, he recreates the digital drawings in Adobe Illustrator and then prints them directly onto the paper manilla folders. But everything has to be perfect. So perfect, that Iaconi-Stewart says he’s actually built two airplanes, the one you see here and the numerous failed attempts including three tails, two entire sets of wings, and multiple experiments to ensure everything is just so.

The paper plane-making wunderkind hopes to finally wrap up the project this summer and isn’t quite sure what will happen next, but thinks an even larger 20-foot model could be an interesting next step. So far there are no plans for the completed model to go anywhere, but it would look great in an aeronautical museum or in the lobby of a certain aircraft manufacturer’s lobby. Just some suggestions. All photos courtesy Luca Iaconi-Stewart. (via Wired)

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The Geometric Paper Torso, Now with DIY Templates and Tutorials 

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A year ago I wrote about this amazing geometric paper torso designed by artist Horst Kiechle. At the time the piece wasn’t actually complete as he was still perfecting how all the organs fit together thanks to feedback he received online. At long last the model is done and Kiechle launched an extensive website with free downloadable templates you can print and assemble along with photographed step-by-step instructions for every single piece. So now there’s no excuse to not spend the next three months of your life on this. Good luck!

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Patrick Bérubé: Incidence 

I love the subtle effect of this installation by Patrick Bérubé. At a distance it looks simply like a white toy container ship resting on the gallery floor. On closer inspection you realize the entire gallery floor has been modified, the gaps between the wooden floorboards mimicking the ocean wake behind the lumbering toy vessel. The piece is part of the Fenêtre sur cour exposition at Gallerie SAS in Montréal that runs through January 12.

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