Tag Archives: movies

A Behind-the-Scenes Timelapse Captures the Extraordinary Physical Labor for the New Stop Motion Film ‘Kubo and the Two Strings’ 


This fantastic timelapse gives a stunning behind-the-scenes glimpse of animators working on the set of the new stop-motion film Kubo and the Two Strings. The film is the latest movie from animation studio Laika, who previously made Coraline, The Boxtrolls, and ParaNorman, and is the directorial debut of Travis Knight who worked as an animator on all of their previous films. You can watch an even longer version here, and the studio made a similar timelapse for the Boxtrolls.



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“2001: A Space Odyssey” Viewed Through Picasso’s Dreams 

Photographer Bhautik Joshi has managed to make the film 2001: A Space Odyssey into something even more terrifying, turning the 1968 Sci-Fi hit into an animation fueled by Picasso. Joshi ran the film through Google’s neural network, Deep Dream, a program that finds and enhances patterns within images through algorithmic pareidolia. This process often leads to the hallucinogenic appearance of even simple images due to the extreme over-processing that occurs in the network.

Joshi took this program a couple of steps further by teaching the system to interpret the cult favorite as a series of Picasso paintings, making it lean more expressionist than trippy. If you like Joshi’s edit of the film, check out more of his work with DeepDream (including an interpretation of Blade Runner) on his Vimeo. (via Sploid)


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The First Trailer for ‘Loving Vincent,’ an Animated Film Featuring 12 Oil Paintings per Second by Over 100 Painters 

The first trailer for Loving Vincent (previously) was just released and it promises stunning visuals in a novel format: the film was created from a staggering 12 oil paintings per second in styles inspired by the famous Dutch painter’s brushstrokes. The upcoming movie will detail the story of Van Gogh’s life leading up to the tumultuous time surrounding his death some 125 years ago. According to the filmmakers, over 100 painters have contributed frames to the ambitious feature-length film that is still in progress at their headquarters in Gdansk, Poland. The film is currently being produced by Oscar-winning studios BreakThru Films and Trademark Films, and you can follow their progress or even get involved yourself on their website. (via Devour)








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A French Museum Dedicated to Over 100 Hyperrealistic Miniature Film Sets 

Le collectionneur de Brooklyn_Miniature de Dan Ohlmann

Housed in a 16th century building in the historic center of Lyon, France is the Musée Miniature et Cinéma, a 5-story museum containing over 100 miniature film sets. The tiny scenes were produced by world-renowned miniaturists and contain the highest form of Hyperrealism in order to trick the audience’s eye into believing each set was indeed life-size.

The handcrafted models contain all the minuscule features that would be found in the film’s actual scene, from fake mold inhabiting peeling walls to scratches seen behind tiny bedposts. The props in the museum’s scenes are also placed with incredible accuracy, disheveled books in libraries propped against each other at just the right angle, and miniature Charles Eames chairs that would even fool the designer. Accurate within these scenes is also their relationship to outside light, windows accentuating or distilling the light to position the set in the right time of day, geographic location or season.

“The subtle lighting arrangement, the painstaking replication of old textures, the use of the same original materials, all contribute to the creation of a moving poetry that resonates with each new miniature panorama,” explains the museum’s website.

If you don’t happen to be traveling to France anytime soon you can see more images of the meticulously detailed scenes on the Musée Miniature et Cinéma’s gallery page here. (via Beautiful/Decay)

Paquebot Normandie - Miniature de Dan Ohlmann


Le dortoir - Miniature de Dan Ohlmann

D.O. Temple Kurama



Maxim's de Paris - Miniature de Dan Ohlmann


Le théâtre de Cupidon - Miniature de Dan Ohlmann


Archives_Miniature de Dan Ohlmann

Prison Saint Paul - Miniature de Dan Ohlmann


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The Visually Stunning ‘Tesseract’ Scene in Interstellar was Filmed on a Physically Constructed Set 


Spoiler alert. One of the most jaw-dropping moments of Christopher Nolan’s 2014 film Interstellar is the climactic moment when Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) enters a visually stunning environment that allows him to physically communicate through time using gravity. In the movie, the scene is manifested as a small library in his home that appears to infinitely repeat with versions of every moment that has ever occurred there. Essentially it’s a cube in four dimensions. Here’s a pretty good explanation of how it works:

The Tesseract is a means of communication for the bulk beings to express action through gravity with NASA. The bulk beings can perceive five dimensions as opposed to four, able to see every moment in the past, present, and future as well as influence gravity within any of those time frames. […] The tesseract allowed Cooper to communicate with Murphy Cooper [his daughter] in various time periods, presenting time itself as a dimension rather than linear. Everything is linked by the strings of time, which Cooper can manipulate. The beings made this comprehensible to Cooper by allowing him to physically interact with the Tesseract.

The idea of the tesseract scene alone was so daunting to the filmmakers, Nolan and his special effects team procrastinated for months before trying to tackle how it might work. After months of concepting and model building the team opted for the unusual approach of using minimal digital effects in favor of fabricating a massive set which the actors could physically manipulate. A remarkable feat considering not only the complexity of the concepts depicted, but the cost and labor of building something so large.

Included here are some shots of the set, a behind-the-scenes interview with Nolan and a number of people from the visual effects team explaining how it was done, and lastly the scene itself. You can watch even more of it here. (via Fubiz)





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A Side-by-side Comparison of the First and Last Frames of 55 Movies 


Filmmaker Jacob T. Swinney edited this phenomenal montage of the beginning and ending frames of 55 different movies shown side-by-side. Perhaps it’s not surprising that there’s often a relationship between the two images, but it’s fascinating to see how different directors employ symmetry, with some going so far as using almost the exact same shot to start and end a movie. You can see a full listing of movie titles with timestamps on Vimeo. (via Susannah Breslin via Kottke)

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