Tag Archives: multiples

The Lunar Cycle Displayed Through 15,000 Colorful Origami Birds 

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All images via Mathgoth Gallerie

Mademoiselle Maurice (previously here and here) recently produced the mural “The Lunar Cycle” in collaboration with the French Mathgoth Gallerie, a temporary piece that pays tribute to the hundreds of residents who were temporarily uprooted due to the upcoming demolition of the building. Composed of 15,000 colorful origami birds, the piece forms the cycles of the moon against the dark background of the wall and covers over 21,000 square feet of space—making it the largest urban mural ever created in Paris. Each origami is painted after folding using a solution deemed “Maurigami” by Mademoiselle Maurice, making the pieces nearly indestructible. You can see more of her original origami-based murals on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Faith is Torment)

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Magical Photographs of Fireflies from Japan’s 2016 Summer 

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Photo by Yu Hashimoto.

Each year when summer comes along, we all look forward to different things. Some of us head to the beach, others to the mountains for camping. Some look forward to the epicurean delights like watermelon and ice cones. But for a select group of photographers in Japan, Summer signals the arrival of fireflies. And for very short periods – typically May and June, from around 7 to 9pm – these photographers set off to secret locations all around Japan, hoping to capture the magical insects that light up the night.

One thing that makes these photographs so magical is that they capture views that the naked eye is simply incapable of seeing. The photographs are typically composites, meaning that they combine anywhere from 10 to 200 of the exact same frame. That’s why it can look like swarms of thousands of fireflies have invaded the forest, when in reality it’s much less. But that’s not to discount these photographs, which require insider knowledge, equipment, skill and patience.

Fireflies live for only about 10 days and they’re extremely sensitive. They react negatively to any form of light and pollution, making finding them half the battle. Here, we present to you some a selection of our favorites from the 2016 summer season. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Photo by fumial.

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Photo by Yasushi Kikuchi.

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Photo by soranopa.

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Photo by miyu.

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Photo by hm777.

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Photo by hm777.

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Organic Creatures Crafted from Plastic Cable Ties by Sui Park 

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Amoeba. Fish. Sea anemone. Aliens. These are all fair interpretations of Korean artist Sui Park's sculptures and installations made from interlocked cable ties. Weaving together the plastic fasteners she creates undulating organic surfaces or swarms of creatures that swim in schools and cluster together like eggs. Park recently had a solo exhibition titled ‘Playing with Perception’ at Denise Bibro Fine Art and currently has work on view at Summer Sculpture Showcase 2016 in Connecticut. You can see more of her work on Behance.

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Undulating Shell Sculptures by Rowan Mersh 

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Turritella Duplicata II, 2015. Turritella duplicata shells.

London-based artist Rowan Mersh assembles dense rolling surfaces comprised of thousands of seashells, tiny solid objects that now appear like fluid waves. Mimicking the natural geometric patterns found in life, the artist uses responsibly sourced shells like windowpane oyster discs or duplicata shells that are tightly arranged in a labor-intensive process, one piece at a time. The shell artworks are just a small portion of Mersh’s artist practice that also spans fashion design, textile sculptures, and interactive installations. He exhibits internationally with Gallery FUMI where you can see much more of his recent works. (thnx, Laura!)

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, 2015. Windowpane oyster shell discs.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Pithvava Male, 2013. Dentalium shells.

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Pithvava Male, detail.

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A Kinetic Artwork that Sorts Thousands of Random River Stones by Age 

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Performing the role of a scientist, Benjamin Maus and Prokop Bartonicek’s kinetic machine Jller selects and sorts pebbles found on a 6 1/2 x 13 foot platform into a grid organized by geologic age. Without assistance, Jller analyzes the stones’ appearance to understand their correct placement, then transports them to the correct location.

All of the rocks for the project were extracted from a German river of the machine’s own name, pebbles that are either the result of erosion in the Alps or have been transported by glaciers. Because the history of this sample location within the river is known, it is a relatively straightforward process to assign each stone its geological age. To do this, Jller first analyzes an image of the stone it selects, extracting information like dominant color, color composition, lines, layers, patterns, grain, and surface texture. The machine then places the stones in alignment of age and type by sucking them into an industrial vacuum gripper and dropping them in the correct location within the grid.

The project is part of ongoing research in the field of industrial automation and historical geology, and was presented last December as a part of the exhibition “Ignorance” at Ex Post in Prague. The full video of the project can be seen below.

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Cherry Blossoms Flood the Inokashira Park Lake in Tokyo 

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

Every spring, photographer Danilo Dungo spends time at Inokashira Park in Tokyo, famous for its abundance of blooming cherry trees. The photographer has become a master at capturing the event from all angles, especially with aerial shots that show the pink flowers covering the nearby lake. Seen here are a handful of shots from the last two years, but you can explore much more on his NatGeo Your Shot page. (via Fubiz)

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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