Tag Archives: multiples

Recent Surveillance Camera and Satellite Dish ‘Nests’ by Jakub Geltner 

Czech artist Jakub Geltner (previously) has been clustering groups of technological equipment in public spaces since 2011, creating installations that address the heightened state of surveillance in our contemporary world. Arranged as ‘nests,’ the sculptures interrupt both natural landscape and urban environments, making the viewer innately aware of how closely they are being watched.

One of Geltner’s latest installations is Nest 06, is a group of cameras installed alongside a pathway leading to the beach in Sydney, Australia created for Sculpture by the Sea. Attached to a curved pole, the devices stare directly down at any passersby with over a dozen watchful eyes. Nest 7, another recent work, dots the side of an aging brick building at Chateau Třebešice, bringing surveillance to the countryside rather than a bustling urban setting.

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Minimalism & Multitude: The Swarming Animated GIFs of Frédéric Vayssouze-Faure 

French animator Frédéric Vayssouze-Faure explores complicated mathematical concepts through short animations he publishes on a Tumblr called Wavegrower. Sine functions, harmonic oscillations, and fractals are all core concepts behind his undulating and swarming animations. Via his artist statement:

This blog is a branch of the wavegrower project in which I’m focused on combining minimalism and multitude to create dynamic artworks with more than one level of reading, the first being that every cell constituting them has its own simple periodic motion, meaning regularly looping by spinning or twisting or stretching or balancing or revolving or swinging or shaking or beating or vibrating, in a word : oscillating.

As with several other designers and artists working with animations of this nature, Vayssouze-Faure shares the source code behind some of his works to help others learn how they work. You can see much more here.

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Artist Dan Lam’s Drippy Blob-Like Sculptures Develop Sparkly Color-Changing Surfaces 

Dallas-based artist Dan Lam organizes her gloopy sculptural works into three categories that perfectly capture the form factor of her general aesthetic: Squishes, Drips, and of course Blobs. The pieces appear to ooze from where they rest, growing stalactite-like appendages that drip from the edges of shelves. The pieces are made primarily from polyurethane foam and acrylic paint and are often adorned with spiky appendages. Some of her latest works have begun to incorporate layers of crystals and color-changing thermal paints that further bring the alien works to life.

“My work has always elicited pretty raw reactions from people, my favorite being the desire to touch the object, to make sense of it with another sense because just seeing it doesn’t satiate the curiosity,” Lam shares with Blackbook Gallery. “I like the tension that is created in that moment.”

Lam most recently had works on view with Black Book Gallery and Guy Hepner. You can see more of her behind-the-scenes process and studio experiments on Instagram.

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A Replica of the Parthenon in Germany Constructed from 100,000 Banned Books 

The Parthenon of Books, 2017.
 Steel, books, and plastic sheeting.
 19.5 × 29.5 × 65.5 m. Commissioned by documenta 14, with support from the Ministry of Media and Culture of Argentina.

South American conceptual artist Marta Minujín has just installed a towering new architectural installation in Germany called The Parthenon of Books, a scaffold replica of the famous Greek temple clad in 100,000 copies of banned books. The piece is currently on view in Kassel, Germany as part of a 100-day art exhibition called Documenta 14.

Minujín worked with students from Kassel University to identify 170 titles that have been historically banned worldwide by various institutions, and then sought help from the public to obtain donated copies. The books were then wrapped in a protective plastic coating to shield them from the elements while allowing visitors to easily identify each title.

An earlier version of The Parthenon of Books was first installed in 1983, referencing an event in Minujín’s native Argentina where books where confiscated and locked up as part of a military junta. This new iteration rests on a site where Nazis burned books by Jewish and Marxist writers in 1933 as part of a broad campaign of censorship.

The Parthenon of Books will be on view through mid-September and you can see more photos at the Instagram hashtag #parthenonofbooks. (thnx, Alice!)

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Embroidered Haute Couture Box Bugs by Noboru Hoareau 

French embroidery artist Noboru Hoareau recently stitched this fun series of creepy insects, spiders, and arthropods comprised mostly of beads. Each piece is embroidered into fabric and framed, an objects he refers to as a “embroidery haute couture box bug”. You can see much more in his Etsy shop. If you liked these, also check out the work of Humayrah Bint Altaf and Adam Pritchett. (via Lustik)

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A Homemade Multipoint Pinhole Camera Made from 32,000 Drinking Straws 

Using 32,000 black drinking straws, collaborators Michael (Mick) Farrell and Cliff Haynes created the Straw Camera, a homemade camera they began experimenting with in 2007. Despite the connection one might draw to a pinhole camera, the Straw Camera actually functions quite differently, producing a multipoint perspective from an array rather than a single point perspective.

The direct analogue process records the light collected from each straw onto a piece of paper secured to the back of the camera. The camera gives a direct 1:1 view of the subject that is placed before it, however it translates the image to one that mirrors that of pointillist painting, breaking the subject into thousands of little dots.

“In a world beset by selfies with their immediate gratification, and HD television in all its glory feeding our visual appetite, a Straw Camera image of an individual, with its engineering projection and disappearance of the subject into the near fog of visual capture, gives the viewer a glimpse of just how transitory perception is,” said Cliff about the camera.

To read more about the project, check out the photography duo’s website for the Straw Camera, or their book which was published earlier this month. (via PetaPixel)

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