Tag Archives: multiples

Undulating Shell Sculptures by Rowan Mersh 

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Turritella Duplicata II, 2015. Turritella duplicata shells.

London-based artist Rowan Mersh assembles dense rolling surfaces comprised of thousands of seashells, tiny solid objects that now appear like fluid waves. Mimicking the natural geometric patterns found in life, the artist uses responsibly sourced shells like windowpane oyster discs or duplicata shells that are tightly arranged in a labor-intensive process, one piece at a time. The shell artworks are just a small portion of Mersh’s artist practice that also spans fashion design, textile sculptures, and interactive installations. He exhibits internationally with Gallery FUMI where you can see much more of his recent works. (thnx, Laura!)

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, 2015. Windowpane oyster shell discs.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Pithvava Male, 2013. Dentalium shells.

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Pithvava Male, detail.

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A Kinetic Artwork that Sorts Thousands of Random River Stones by Age 

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Performing the role of a scientist, Benjamin Maus and Prokop Bartonicek’s kinetic machine Jller selects and sorts pebbles found on a 6 1/2 x 13 foot platform into a grid organized by geologic age. Without assistance, Jller analyzes the stones’ appearance to understand their correct placement, then transports them to the correct location.

All of the rocks for the project were extracted from a German river of the machine’s own name, pebbles that are either the result of erosion in the Alps or have been transported by glaciers. Because the history of this sample location within the river is known, it is a relatively straightforward process to assign each stone its geological age. To do this, Jller first analyzes an image of the stone it selects, extracting information like dominant color, color composition, lines, layers, patterns, grain, and surface texture. The machine then places the stones in alignment of age and type by sucking them into an industrial vacuum gripper and dropping them in the correct location within the grid.

The project is part of ongoing research in the field of industrial automation and historical geology, and was presented last December as a part of the exhibition “Ignorance” at Ex Post in Prague. The full video of the project can be seen below.

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Cherry Blossoms Flood the Inokashira Park Lake in Tokyo 

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

Every spring, photographer Danilo Dungo spends time at Inokashira Park in Tokyo, famous for its abundance of blooming cherry trees. The photographer has become a master at capturing the event from all angles, especially with aerial shots that show the pink flowers covering the nearby lake. Seen here are a handful of shots from the last two years, but you can explore much more on his NatGeo Your Shot page. (via Fubiz)

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Bits and Pieces: An Expandable Kinetic Toy Sphere Installation by Nils Volker 

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Bits and Pieces, 2016. Nils Völker. Plastic balls, wood, motors, custom electronics and programming, size variable. Photo by Bresadola+Freese/drama-berlin.de

For his latest kinetic installation titled Bits and Pieces, artist Nils Volker (previously) repurposed 108 toy Hoberman spheres which he suspended from microcontrollers inside a space at NOME Gallery in Berlin. Once attached to motors, the spheres are then synchronized to various rhythms and patterns to create moving sequences that mimic living organisms. The piece was on view through last week, but you can see more photos on Volker’s website.

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Photo by Bresadola+Freese/drama-berlin.de

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Photo by Bresadola+Freese/drama-berlin.de

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Photo by Bresadola+Freese/drama-berlin.de

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Photo by Bresadola+Freese/drama-berlin.de

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Photo by Bresadola+Freese/drama-berlin.de

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New Rainbow-Hued Origami Street Art by Mademoiselle Maurice 

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Mademoiselle Maurice’s work hanging from the Museum of National Art Singapore, all images via Mademoiselle Maurice.

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Museum of National Art Singapore

It’s been a few years since we last featured French street artist Mademoiselle Maurice (previously here and here) and we were delighted to catch up with her new artfully placed pieces on the streets and buildings of Singapore, Corsica, Sweden, and Italy. Arranged both haphazardly and in detailed arrangements, Mademoiselle Maurice adheres thousands of brightly colored origami works to unexpected places, decorating everything from the ceilings of national art museums to the worn sides of ancient buildings. You can see more of her origami works on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Wooster Collective)

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Malmo, Sweden

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Malmo, Sweden

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Malmo, Sweden

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Porto-Vecchio, Corsica

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Porto-Vecchio, Corsica

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San Potito, Italy

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San Potito, Italy

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50,000 Solar Powered Bulbs Illuminate the Australian Desert in Bruce Munro’s Field of Light Installation 

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All images courtesy of Bruce Munro

Over 50,000 bulbs light up an expanse of Australia’s Red Centre desert near Ayers Rock in an installation about the size of four football fields. The solar powered work, Field of Light Uluru, was produced by artist Bruce Munro who conceived of the idea while visiting Uluru in 1992. Twelve years later he created its first iteration in a field behind his home, and it has since moved the work around to several different sights across the United Kingdom, United States, and Mexico.

Field of Light was a project that refused to leave the artist’s sketchbook. “I saw in my mind a landscape of illuminated stems that, like the dormant seed in a dry desert, quietly wait until darkness falls, under a blazing blanket of southern stars, to bloom with gentle rhythms of light,” said Munro.

The British artist is best known for his light installations which often contain components numbering in the thousands. These large works refer to his own experience as being a tiny element to life’s larger pattern, and employ light as a way to tap into a more emotional response with his viewers.

Profits for the installation will benefit the local community. The Anangu tribe have named the piece Tili Wiru Tjuta Nyakutjaku in Pitjantjatjara which translates to “looking at lots of beautiful lights.”

You can visit the expansive installation yourself starting April 1st and running through March of 2017.

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