Tag Archives: multiples

Tiny Colorful Objects Meticulously Organized by Adam Hillman 

If you need a dose of color (and sugar) injected into your Instagram feed, the account belonging to Adam Hillman is probably your best bet. The New Jersey-based visual artist sifts through multitudes of colorful everyday objects and foods which he organizes into zen-like patterns, towers, and gradients. Seen here are some of our favorites from the last few months, and he posts frequently on Instagram and Tumblr. (via Things Organized Neatly)

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Clusters of White Balloons Photographed Invading Landscapes and Homes by Charles Pétillon 

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Photographer Charles Pétillon (previously) captures arranged configurations of balloons in a variety of environments—trapping the illuminated organic shapes momentarily in his photographs. The huddles of balloons are metaphors for Pétillon, a nod to the objects, buildings, and structures we often pass by in our busy lives without taking the time to really notice them. Last year he produced a 177-foot-long installation for London’s Covent Garden, a work that he titled Heartbeat.

“Each balloon has its own dimensions and yet is part of a giant but fragile composition that creates a floating cloud above the energy of the market below,” explained Pétillon about his 2015 installation. “This fragility is represented by contrasting materials and also the whiteness of the balloons that move and pulse appearing as alive and vibrant as the area itself.”

Pétillon’s words can also be applied to his current oeuvre, a selection of which is currently on display in a solo exhibition titled Invasions. The works are featured at Magda Danysz Gallery in Paris through January 14, 2017, and also includes a site-specific installation of balloons to mirror those within his photographs. You can see a behind-the-scenes shoot below, as well as more final images of his balloon series on his website and Instagram. His work is also seen in the book Public Art Now.

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A Ceiling of Pink Balloons Contained in a French Hotel Courtyard Mimics the Fall of Cherry Blossoms 

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Nestled within a courtyard at the Hôtel de Griffy in Montpellier, France, this 2015 installation of pink and white balloons attempts to capture the feeling of spring by mimicking the color and feel of cherry blossoms as they fall from the ceiling. The 6-day installation titled “Un dixième Printemps” (The 10th Spring) was created by Margaux Rodot, Benoit Tastet, and Mickaël Martin, and draws inspiration from Hanami, a Japanese tradition of enjoying the abundance of blooming flowers across the country from the end of March to early May.

Netting secured across the courtyard ceiling effectively contained the helium-filled balloons that were gradually replenished each day as they gradually fell to a patch of grass below. Sunlight from above cast a pink hue into the space that filled windows and balconies surrounding the installation space. Un dixième Printemps was created for the 10th annual Lively Architecture Festival and went on to win the 2015 Jury Award. (via Designboom)

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Architectural Sculptures by David Moreno Look Like Wild Pencil Sketches 

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Working with hundreds of steel rods and pieces of piano wire, Spanish artist David Moreno constructs unwieldy sculptures that look like 2D sketches. Usually centered around a structure or row of house-like buildings, each artwork is designed to look like a haphazard collection of sticks, perhaps something easily destroyed by a big bad wolf. The link between drawing and sculpturing is very intentional as Moreno himself refers to his process as literally “trying to draw sculptures.” You can see more of his work on Behance.

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Airportraits: Composite Flight Path Photos Capture Planes Landing and Departing from Worldwide Airports 

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For his ambitious Airportraits series, photographer Mike Kelley sets up camp outside of airports and meticulously photographs planes as they takeoff and land—shooting thousands of photos per location. He then uses Photoshop to isolate the planes and combines the images into the composite “portraits” you see here. Each image tells a fascinating story about the nature of each airport and the many unseen variables that affect the flight paths of each airport like noise regulations, plane size, and air traffic patterns.

When he initially began the project two years ago, Kelley’s plan was relatively straightforward: fly to 10 or so cities around the globe and spend a day or two at each airport scouting the location, taking photos, and then off to the next destination. This plan worked well in Europe where the weather was consistent, but soon he faced the reality that seasonal weather in places like Japan was completely unpredictable. In Tokyo he left without a single usable photo after days of trying. Some cities he had to return to 2-3 times in hopes the weather would improve, and in other places it would take nearly a week to photograph enough planes to make an image.

During editing, most planes are left “as is” in the location they appeared in the sky while taking off. Planes in the processes of landing proved to be more difficult. “For the landing images, I did take slight artistic liberty with the position of the aircraft, because in real life the planes follow a very specific glidepath to the touchdown point,” Kelley shares with Colossal. “If I hadn’t moved them, all the planes would be directly on top of one another and there’d be no real dynamics or movement in the image.”

In all, Kelley created 19 composite images you can explore on his website, all of which are available as limited edition fine art prints. You can see more of his photography on Instagram. (via Boing Boing, Kottke)

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Otherworldly Pencil Sculptures by Jennifer Maestre 

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Originally inspired by the form and function of a sea urchin, artist Jennifer Maestre constructs unwieldy organic forms using pencils and pencil shavings that bloom like unworldly flowers. Some of her latest pieces appear to have grown tentacles and rest atop pedestals like scaley octopi. The artworks are designed to simultaneously attract the viewer but also offer a certain aesthetic defense. She shares in her artist statement:

The spines of the urchin, so dangerous yet beautiful, serve as an explicit warning against contact. The alluring texture of the spines draws the touch in spite of the possible consequences. The tension unveiled, we feel push and pull, desire and repulsion. The sections of pencils present aspects of sharp and smooth for two very different textural and aesthetic experiences. Paradox and surprise are integral in my choice of materials.

Several pieces by Maestre were recently on view as part of an exhibition titled “Waste to Art” in Baku, Azerbaijan. You can see more of her works-in-progress on Facebook.

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