Tag Archives: multiples

New Nail Sculptures by John Bisbee That Twist Across Floors and Walls 


John Bisbee (previously) has worked with nails as a sculptural medium since he accidentally toppled a bucket of them years ago and was astonished to see how they remained intact, rusted and fused into a single object. Every since, he’s been hammering nails of varying size into complex patterns, using the smallest woodworking nails up to giant 12-inch spikes. Although nails large and small continue to be the focus of his artistic practice, his sculptures remain diverse in their presentation and composition, twisted works making wildly chaotic patterns against walls and neatly arranged nails snaking along gallery floors.

Bisbee currently has two solo exhibitions on view including “Floresco” at the SCAD Museum of Art (through January 3, 2016) and “Only nails, always different” at the PCA&D Gallery (through the end of December). His work is also included in the 2015 Portland Museum of Art Biennial titled “You Can’t Get There From Here” through January 3, 2016.












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In 2001, Artist Ha Schult Wrapped a Former Berlin Post Office in Thousands of Oversized Love Letters Collected From the Public 


German conceptual artist HA Schult (b. 1939) has often worked in the realm of other people’s trash, creating large scale-works that force art into everyday life and call attention to the massive consumption of Western society. In Schult’s installation “Trash People,” he built hundreds of human-sized figures with cans, license plates, and soda bottles—a trash army built from garbage dumps that has been traveling the world for the last 19 years.

For his 2001 piece “Love Letters Building,” Schult used purposeful documentation instead of unwanted detritus to cover the facade of a former Berlin post office. Schult sent out a call for love letters—a gesture highlighting modern German romanticism, and a not-so-subtle reminder of the age before quick exchange email. The response to his public request was overwhelming. The resulting 150,000 letters ranged from heartfelt to humorous, subjects ranging between lovers, relatives, and even an owner and a pet.

A letter from the latter read, “I can’t live without you. The loss feels deeper by the day.” Then ends with the words, “It is a pity you’re a cat.”

About 35,000 of the collected letters were used to plaster the outside of the building in a colorful mass of whites, reds, oranges, and blues, while about 115,000 more were found inside. (via RIKA










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A Canopy of 1,100 Umbrellas Above the 2015 Habitare Design Fair in Finland 


To transform the interior of the Ahead Arena at the 2015 Habitare Design Fair in Finland (part of Helsinki Design Week), environmental artist Kaisa Berry and creative director Timo Berry of BOTH conceived of this lighter-than-air umbrella cloud suspended above a main stage. The duo used 1,1000 white umbrellas hung at various intervals, somewhat like similar outdoor installations we’ve seen in Portugal. The installation served as a backdrop for speaking events as well as live performances. You can see a few more views in this image search. (via Wallpaper)





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New Ornate Kaleidoscopic Installations That Mimic Patterned Textiles by Suzan Drummen 


Meticulously placing small, ornate materials in eye-dazzling patterns Suzan Drummen (previously) produces kaleidoscopic installations that appear like three dimensional textiles. Within these pieces Drummen likes to explore how artwork can seduce and repulse, drawing the viewer in to take a closer look at the specific details that form the larger installation.

“From a distance they appear clear and orderly, yet upon closer inspection, the eyes become disoriented by the many details and visual stimuli,” said Drummen. “That moment of being able to take it all in or not is explored time and time again.”

Although many of her pieces when zoomed out appear like textiles, a recent installation takes this to heart, appearing like two oriental rugs—one in the color scheme of pink and red and the other in greens and blues. The first piece subtly climbs up the wall, playing further into the illusionistic quality of how her crystal constructions are perceived. This optical trickery is also reflected in her works that involve bodies, ordinarily dressed participants bedazzled to match the pattern on which they sit or lay.

You can see more of the Netherlands-based artist’s work on her Facebook page here.




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Hundreds of Vibrant Doors Found Within Lithuania’s “Garage Towns” Photographed by Agne Gintalaite 


Lithuanian artist Agne Gintalaite has always been attracted to the “garage towns” of her native Lithuania—large areas filled with storage units for cars that were terribly inconvenient and often bus rides away from the owners’ homes. In her series Beauty Remains, Gintalaite explores the multitude of garage doors she has discovered on her explorations, the brightly colored wooden and metal doors that look as if time has tried to claw them to pieces, yet their vibrancy withstands each passing year.

Her project began after a recent trip to IKEA revealed a sprawling garage town near the megastore filled with hundreds of examples of these doors that outlasted the time when IKEAs were nowhere to be found. “By documenting these objects that are, most likely, about to disappear from Lithuanian society, I wished to communicate to the viewer the ambivalent, aesthetic, but also human significance of these garage doors,” said Gintalaite. “Beautifully painterly, these doors do not need be explained to the beholder. It is the fascinating play of colour and texture that I attempted to capture with my camera.”

In documenting these doors the artist also found herself documenting human dignity as the owners continue to hold onto their property in areas in which big businesses increasingly impede on the urban landscape. “As long as they last,” said Gintalaite, “this uncanny beauty remains.”

Gintalaite received her BA in Art History and Theory from Vilnius Academy of Arts in Lithuania, and is currently a freelance photographer and art director. You can find more of her work on her Tumblr and Behance. (via My Modern Met)










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An Impressive Aerial View and Timelapse of Record-Breaking ‘Sail Amsterdam’ 2015 


Billed as the largest free nautical event in the world, Sail Amsterdam is a quinquennial (every five years) gathering of 600+ boats and tall ships that sail in a circuit in the Netherland’s North Sea Canal before mooring in Amsterdam. The 2015 event was held just last week and according to the NL Times a record-breaking 2.7 million people arrived to watch the maritime spectable that included at least 50 tall ships and hundreds of smaller watercraft. This aerial photo and a timelapse filmed by Boyd Baptist really captures the enormity of the event. (via Jeroen Apers)

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A Cloud of 100,000 Illuminated Balloons Suspended Inside Covent Garden by Charles Pétillion 


French artist and photographer Charles Pétillion has just unveiled a cumulus cloud composed of 100,000 white balloons illuminated from the inside at London’s Covent Garden. Titled ‘Heartbeat,’ the installation was created as part of the upcoming London Design Festival and stretches the length of the South Hall ceiling of the Market Building. Pétillion is known for his use of white balloons to fill unusual spaces, a photographic series he refers to as Invasions. This is by far his largest installation to date and his first public art piece. He shares about Heartbeat:

The balloon invasions I create are metaphors. Their goal is to change the way in which we see the things we live alongside each day without really noticing them. With Heartbeat I wanted to represent the Market Building as the beating heart of this area – connecting its past with the present day to allow visitors to re-examine its role at the heart of London’s life.

Each balloon has its own dimensions and yet is part of a giant but fragile composition that creates a floating cloud above the energy of the market below. This fragility is represented by contrasting materials and also the whiteness of the balloons that move and pulse appearing as alive and vibrant as the area itself.

The installation will be on view through September 27, 2015, and you can watch a timelapse video of its construction and an interview with Pétillion below. (via Designboom)








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