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A Keith Haring Mural Painted in 1986 and Under Wraps for 30 Years Has Been Revealed in Amsterdam

June 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Keith Haring’s recently unveiled mural in Amsterdam. Photo: Hanna Hachula, courtesy Stedelijk Museum

Completed over just two days in 1986, a Keith Haring mural in Amsterdam has been revealed once again after nearly thirty years out of sight. The famed artist completed the 40-foot tall-white line painting on an outside wall during his (indoor) exhibit at the Stedelijk Museum. However, it disappeared from view a few years later when the brick facade was weatherboarded to improve climate control; the building was a storage site for the museum’s collections. Over the last ten years, graffiti artist Aileen Middel (a.k.a. Mick La Rock) pushed for the mural—his largest in Europe—to be revealed once again. The restoration of the mural was made possible because the museum changed its storage location and the building is now a Markt Kwartier West grocery store and distribution center. (via Artnet)

The mural being unveiled. Photos: Mick La Rock

Haring painting the mural in 1986. Photo: Patricia Steur

 

 



Sponsor

San Francisco’s Exploratorium Presents Inflatable, an Exhibition of Gigantic Air-filled Artworks (Sponsor)

May 22, 2018

Colossal

Explore, play, and wonder at gigantic, fantastical, artworks at Inflatable a new summer exhibition at the Exploratorium, San Francisco’s iconic museum of art, science, and human perception.

Curated by Christopher Jobson, founder and editor-in-chief of Colossal, Inflatable features artwork by Tasmanian environmental artist Amanda Parer, balloon sculptor Jason Hackenwerth, interactive artist and educator Jimmy Kuehnle, technology-inspired designer Shih Chieh Huang, and Rhode Island collective Pneuhaus. Massive air-filled, human-like figures will fill the museum from floor to ceiling, along with dynamic sculptures of otherworldly organisms, a forest of cushiony columns, an inflatable insect-eye room, and more. Even visitors familiar with the Exploratorium will see the space in a new way.

Rated the #1 Museum in San Francisco on TripAdvisor, the Exploratorium is more than a museum. Visitors of all ages can step inside a tornado, turn upside down in a giant curved mirror, walk on a fog bridge, and explore more than 650 hands-on exhibits. The museum offers all of this plus unique programs, discussions, and events; a café and restaurant; two stores; and more at its beautiful San Francisco waterfront location on the historic Embarcadero.

Located between the historic Ferry Building and Pier 39, the Exploratorium is a short distance from any of these popular attractions: Fisherman’s Wharf, the Alcatraz ferries, and downtown.

  • Daily Summer Hours (May 26–September 3), 10am–5pm (All ages)
  • After Dark Thursday Evenings, 6–10pm (Ages 18+)
  • Friday Evening Extended Hours (July 6–August 31), 10am–9pm (All Ages)

Entry to Inflatable is included with museum admission.

Learn more at exploratorium.edu/inflatable and follow the Exploratorium on FacebookTwitter & Instagram.

 

 



Art

Colossal Curates ‘Inflatable: Expanding Works of Art’ at San Francisco’s Exploratorium Museum

April 16, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Fantastic Planet by Amanda Parer. Photo by Parer Studio

Colossal is thrilled to announce the summer show, Inflatable: Expanding Works of Art at San Francisco’s Exploratorium, a museum dedicated to science, art and human perception. Led by our founder and editor-in-chief Christopher Jobson, Colossal has worked closely with the Exploratorium team to curate the museum’s summer 2018 exhibition. Inflatable brings together artists from around the world who work in the mediums of textiles, technology, and air.

Jason Hackenwerth (previously), renowned for his massive balloon sculptures that often simulate the universal biology of living things, will be building an inflated sculpture comprised of thousands of hand-tied balloons. Cauldron Veil will be built in front of the public at the Exploratorium in the days before the exhibition opening, and hoisted up to the ceiling where it will be suspended over visitors.

Tasmania-based artist Amanda Parer (previously) examines the relationships between humans and our natural surroundings in her large-scale white inflatable sculptures. Parer’s series, Fantastic Planet, includes two enormous humanoid figures that will be hard to miss as they tower over gallery walls.

Jimmy Kuehlne taps into interactivity, wonder, and humor in his diverse range of artworks. For Inflatable, he’ll be building a forest of glowing air-filled columns that invite museum-goers to explore his art from within. The Cleveland-based artist describes the spirit of his creations: “If I can make something that you can’t quite put in a category, then maybe there’s going to be a short circuit and you’ll have a genuine interaction.”

Inflatable visitors will also have the chance to step inside a fly’s eye as built by Rhode Island-based design collective PneuhausCompound Camera  is a uniquely functional geodesic dome that turns the world upside down and inside out using 109 inflated spherical camera obscuras.

Technology, electronics, and everyday materials collide in Taiwanese artist Shih Chieh Huang‘s responsive sculptures. Huang, who is based in New York, will be installing Guardian of the Disphotic, a fleet of interconnected sculptures that move and breathe in response to their environment.

Pisces by Jason Hackenwerth. Photo by the artist

Please, No Smash by Jimmy Kuehnle. Photo by Robert Muller

Compound Camera by Pneuhaus. Photo by Cassidy Batiz

Reusable Universes by Shih Chieh Huang. Photo by Steve Briggs

The Exploratorium is a unique public learning laboratory with a mission to create inquiry-based experiences that transform learning worldwide. Centrally located on San Francisco’s waterfront Embarcadero, the Exploratorium is filled with hundreds of explore-for-yourself exhibits. These interactive stations will be on view alongside Inflatable. We’re also developing public programming and family-friendly evening events specifically for the summer show—stay tuned! Inflatable opens on May 26 and is open through September 3, 2018. Find out more and plan your visit on the Exploratorium website.

 

 



Art

Museum Visitors Invited to Crawl and Slide Inside Massive Suspended Tape Structure

January 23, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographs by Dan Hodges and Rich Sanders

The Des Moines Art Center’s recent exhibit, Drawing in Space, highlighted four artists working in the medium of tape. The show included Numen/For Use (previously), an artist collective based in Vienna and Zagreb. Their interactive sculpture, called simply “Tape,” is made exclusively of clear packing tape, suspended within the art center’s I.M. Pei-designed architecture. Museum visitors are encouraged to explore the piece from the inside out—as long as they wear socks and move through the structure in a clockwise direction. Numen’s exhibit at the Art Center closed on January 21st, and we’re looking forward to seeing where it appears next. Previous iterations have been built in Paris, Frankfurt, and Vienna. See more of Numen/For Use’s work on their website and Facebook.

 

 



Art Photography

Museum Patrons Accidentally Matching Artworks Photographed by Stefan Draschan

November 1, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Stefan Draschan visits museums around Europe to see not just the artwork but the people observing the artwork. In his series People Matching Artworks he patiently waits for museum-goers who unintentionally coordinate with the art they’re observing, and snaps a candid photo of the coincidence. You can follow the tumblr for this project, as well as a behind-the-scenes tumblr, and find links to Draschan’s other observational collections on his website. (via Kottke)

 

 



Art History

Text SFMOMA Your Favorite Emoji and Receive an Artwork From Their Vast Collection

July 11, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's newest tech tool allows any smartphone user to gain access to the artworks hidden behind their archive doors, a collection so large that it would stretch 121.3 miles if you placed each artwork end-to-end. With only 5% of this collection on view, the museum decided to create Send Me SFMOMA, a texting service that delivers an artwork to your phone based on a sent emoji or phrase. For example, the first emoji I decided to text was a goat, for which they return Takuma Nakahira's 2008 Untitled image of—you guessed it, a goat.

To participate, text the number 572-51 the words “send me” followed by either a keyword (such as a color, emotion, or type of art) or an emoji. A quick response will bring your phone an image of an artwork from SFMOMA’s vast collection, in addition to a caption containing the artist, artwork title, and year. Within the first four days of the program over 3,000 artworks were generated, a larger number than the amount of works currently on view.

The system isn’t perfect, more of my inquiries came back with an error message than an artwork, however the intrigue of seeing a piece that has been tucked away from the public is quite addicting. I especially loved seeing what some of my most used emojis resulted in, such as the single eye which brought Tomoko Sawada's Early Days (1996) to my inbox. (via Hyperallergic)

 

 



Design

Gaudí’s First Built House Opens to the Public for the First Time in its 130-Year-Old History

June 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

© Casa Vicens, Barcelona 2017. All images by Pol Viladoms.

Built between 1883 and 1885, Casa Vicens is the very first home designed by Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí. During most of the Barcelona home’s 130-year-old history it served as a private residence, but thanks to a 2014 purchase by MoraBanc and a massive two-year renovation, the 19th-century building will be repurposed as a cultural center opening this October.

Casa Vicens was originally commissioned by the tile manufacturer Manuel Vicens i Montaner as a summer home, but sold in 1899 to the Jover family who owned the house for more than a century. The restoration of Casa Vicens began in April 2015, led by architects José Antonio Martínez Lapeña and Elías Torres, of Martínez Lapeña-Torres Arquitectes, and David García of Daw Office. The new museum will display many of Gaudís original designs while hosting both permanent and rotating exhibitions within its grand interior.

The building itself stands as an early example of the architect’s Neo-Mudéjar architecture, and is one of eight UNESCO World Human Heritage Site in Barcelona. Casa Vicens completes the Gaudí Route, a series of more than a dozen buildings designed by the architect including the breathtaking La Sagrada Familia. (via Dezeen and Hyperallergic)

 

 

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