Tag Archives: New York

This Photograph of the NYC Winter Storm Looks Like an Impressionist Painting 

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Photo © Michele Palazzo. Jonas Blizzard in New York, 2016.

While walking through the Jonas Winter Storm that swept across the East Coast last week, photographer Michele Palazzo captured this incredible shot of the Flatiron Building against a backdrop of swirling snow. With the exception of a few minor details like logos and a food cart, the image looks like an impressionist painting right out of another another century. The cloudy atmosphere and gusty winds create patterns that appear uncannily like brush strokes. You can see more of Palazzo’s shots from the morning of January 23rd on EyeEm.

Update: The folks over at EyeEm have a nice roundup of Jonas storm photos.

Update 2: The snowflakes you see in the window of the Flatiron are part of a paper origami installation by Chelsea Hrynick Browne in the Prow Artspace.

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NYPL Shares Huge Archive of 180,000 High-Res Public Domain Images Online, Announces ‘Remix Residency’ 

At a small American Legion carnival near Bellows Falls, Vermont. Photo by Jack Delano, 1941.

At a small American Legion carnival near Bellows Falls, Vermont. Photo by Jack Delano, 1941.

The New York Public Library just released high-resolution scans of 180,000 public domain images including photographs, etchings, watercolors, sheet music, maps, stereoscopic views, and other images dating back as far as the 11th century. From their press release:

Did you know that more than 180,000 of the items in our Digital Collections are in the public domain? That means everyone has the freedom to enjoy and reuse these materials in almost limitless ways. The Library now makes it possible to download such items in the highest resolution available directly from the Digital Collections website. No permission required. No restrictions on use.

Not only is the NYPL encouraging people to use these public domain images in their personal endeavors without restriction, they’ve also announced the NYPL Labs Remix Residency for “artists, information designers, software developers, data scientists, and journalists.” Selected individuals will have the opportunity to work on-site at the NYPL as part of a paid residency to create work from this near endless resource of imagery. If that sounds interesting to you—which I know it does—you can apply online here.

They’ve also built a fantastic visual search tool that allows you to sort images by genre, date, and even color. Go make something amazing people! (via Kottke)

Soleil couchant. Watercolor, 1875. Félix Bracquemond.

Soleil couchant. Watercolor, 1875. Félix Bracquemond.

Daughter of Mr. Buck Grant, Negro preacher near Woodville, Greene County, Georgia. Photo by Jack Delano, 1941.

Daughter of Mr. Buck Grant, preacher near Woodville, Greene County, Georgia. Photo by Jack Delano, 1941.

Seventh Avenue looking south from 35th Street, Manhattan. 1935.

Seventh Avenue looking south from 35th Street, Manhattan. 1935.

DINNER TO S & H MANAGERS [held by] SPERRY & HUTCHINSON [at] “WALDORF-ASTORIA, [NEW YORK]” (HOTEL;) 1907.

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Engraving of Miss O’Neill in the character of Belvidera in the stage production Venice Preserved, Act 3, Scene 1. Engraving. 1814.

Butterfly engravings, 1833 - 1830. Dumont d'Urville, Jules-Sébastien-César.

Butterfly engravings, 1833 – 1830. Dumont d’Urville, Jules-Sébastien-César.

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From 1975-1980 Activist Adam Purple Built a Circular Urban Garden in New York that ‘Knocked Down’ the Surrounding Buildings 

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Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

In 1975, artist and social activist Adam Purple, known for his permanent purple attire, looked out his window in the crime-ridden Lower East Side of New York City to witness two children playing in a pile of rubble. Struck by his own memories of a childhood spent barefoot in rural pastures and forests in Missouri, he suddenly wished these children could feel the dirt beneath their own feet in a safe, debris-free environment. Almost immediately he began work on the Garden of Eden.

Over period of five years, Purple worked continuously to build a concentric garden that would eventually grow to 15,000 square feet. As nearby abandoned structures were torn down the garden continued to grow, a process he metaphorically likened to a garden that knocked down the buildings around it. He physically hauled bricks and building materials away from the site, and hauled in manure from the horses in Central Park.

The Garden of Eden not only provided safe haven to the community, but also produced food in the form of corn, berries, tomatoes, and cucumbers. By the early 80s it had become a famous and beloved landmark in the Lower East Side.

Unfortunately the city of New York never officially recognized Purple’s garden. While other local parks were clearly marked on official city maps, the Garden of Eden space was always labeled as ‘vacant’. Despite pleas from the community, the entire garden was razed with bulldozers in just 75 minutes on January 8, 1986 to make way for development.

Purple himself narrates his story in this thoughtful video by Harvey Wang and Amy Brost from back in 2011. Sadly, he died two weeks ago at the age of 84, and there is currently a fund-raising effort to collect money for his burial and to erect a memorial near 184 Forsyth Street where the garden once stood. Donated.

You can see more photos and read more about Purple in this book, also by Wang & Brost.

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Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

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Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

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Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

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Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

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Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

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Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

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Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

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Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

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After a decade of work and upkeep, the Garden of Eden was razed with bulldozers on January 8, 1986 by the City of New York in 75 minutes.

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Adam Purple, 1930-2015. Still from Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden / Harvey Wang and Amy Brost

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Vertical Panoramic Photographs of New York Churches by Richard Silver 

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Church of St. Vincent Ferrer

Richard Silver (previously) has a unique way of looking at architecture, building composite photographs from several images that seamlessly reveal a structure’s interior. His new series captures the insides of New York churches, and are perfectly timed for the Pope’s impending arrival on U.S. soil. These images are composed of 6-10 shots, forming a vertical panorama so cohesive that it might give you vertigo.

Although Silver has been to hundreds of churches during his career and many years of travel, it’s only recently that he figured out how to capture the expansive inner beauty of their architecture. “Finding the perfect location in the center aisle then shooting vertically from the pew to the back of the church gives the perspective that only architecture of this style can portray,” says Silver.

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Church of St. Stephen / Church of St. Paul the Apostle

Silver was born and raised in New York and has visited 75 countries in his life, including 13 last year alone. His previous careers involved computer science, real estate, and a stint on Wall Street, but he embraced photography full-time in 2011. You can see more of his vertical church series on his Flickr page here.

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Calvary Episcopal Church

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Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Sava / Church of the Village

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Church of St. Francis Xavier

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Vincent St. de Paul / Most Holy Redeemer Church

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St. Monica’s Church

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A Timelapse of Illustrator Patrick Vale Drawing a Huge Pen & Ink View of the New York Skyline 

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In December of last year London-based artist Patrick Vale spent several weeks drawing this impressive pen and ink illustration of the New York skyline as viewed from the Rockefeller Center. Luckily he photographed almost every moment of the endeavor to make this timelapse where we see building after building materialize at the tip of his pen. The final piece titled Colossus is a triptych of three huge A1 sheets of paper that he scanned and turned into an even larger wallpaper. You might remember Vale from his 2012 drawing timelapse of Lower Manhattan.(via Highsnobiety)

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A Technicolor Swimming Pool Painted by HOTTEA on New York’s Roosevelt Island 

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In a departure from his large-scale color field yarn installations, Minnesota-based artist HOT TEA is back in New York and was given the opportunity to transform a swimming pool on Roosevelt Island with whatever colors he saw fit. Apparently he took the ambitious approach and decided to use them all, spread between 120 gallons of paint.

The private commission produced by K&CO and Pliskin Architecture is called Asylum, a title the artist chose “because the act of creating it pushed my mental and physical endurance so far that I wasn’t sure I could complete the task,” he shares with Brooklyn Street Art. For almost a century starting in 1839, the island was also home to the New York City Lunatic Asylum. The vibrantly luminous gradients that define the area around the pool contrast starkly when viewed against the rest of the surrounding landscape, creating a surprising oasis of color.

The pool, located in Manhattan Park, opens for swimming Memorial Day weekend. You can read a bit more about it on Brooklyn Street Art.

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Photo by Jamie Rojo for Brooklyn Street Art

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Photo by Jamie Rojo for Brooklyn Street Art

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Painted Pedestrian Views of Dark, Urban Scenes by Cristóbal Pérez García 

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Iron Raining. Oil on canvas. 89 x 146 cm

Iron Raining. Oil on canvas. 89 x 146 cm

Lights at the Bus Stop. Oil on canvas. 120 x 120 cm

Lights at the Bus Stop. Oil on canvas. 120 x 120 cm

5ª Avenida.195 x 195 cm

5ª Avenida.195 x 195 cm

Empire State. 146 x 146 cm

Empire State. 146 x 146 cm

Afternoon From High Line Park. Oil on canvas. 120 x 120 cm.

Afternoon From High Line Park. Oil on canvas. 120 x 120 cm.

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Cristóbal Pérez García’s oil painted scenes are those found in twilight or dusk, landscapes encased in smog and the highly trafficked realities of living in an urban metropolis. The vantage points are those of the pedestrian, Garcia’s own view when embarking on a new city to paint. He recently shared a video, Traffic, that gives a short, but intimate glimpse into his process both within the studio and on the street.

Garcia’s highly textured paintings give a nice balance to the blurred masses of city inhabitants and his detailed buses, cabs, and cars. Each painting also has an emphasis on light, either natural or the reflection of vehicle and traffic lights in the crowded streets.

Garcia was born in 1976 in Álora, Málaga and studied painting and sculpture at the Universidad de Granada, Spain. Garcia has upcoming exhibitions at Galería Mar from March 5-18, and Art Expo New York from April 23-26. You can see more of Garcia’s urban landscapes on his website and frequently posted on Twitter. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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