Tag Archives: objects

Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan

Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan objects books
Bicycle, 1980s; Raleigh; Component count: 893. Photo reproduced with the permission of Thames & Hudson.

Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan objects books
Bicycle, 1980s; Raleigh; Component count: 893. Photo reproduced with the permission of Thames & Hudson.

Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan objects books
Chainsaw, 1990s; Homelite; Component count: 286. Photo reproduced with the permission of Thames & Hudson.

Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan objects books
Laptop Computer, 2006; Apple; Component count: 639. Photo reproduced with the permission of Thames & Hudson.

Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan objects books
Children’s Wagon, 2011; Schwinn; Component count: 296. Photo reproduced with the permission of Thames & Hudson.

Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan objects books
Smartphone, 2007; BlackBerry; Component count: 120. Photo reproduced with the permission of Thames & Hudson.

Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan objects books
Smartphone, 2007; BlackBerry; Component count: 120. Photo reproduced with the permission of Thames & Hudson.

Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan objects books
Swiss Army Knife, 2000s; Victorinox; Component count: 38.

Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan objects books

I’ll never forget the excitement I felt the first time I disassembled a telephone. I was eight years old, on our back porch with just an old screwdriver and a pair of pliers, but seeing what was inside this everyday object was a discovery akin to unearthing a dinosaur. The sudden knowledge that the speaker part was magnetic and contained a mile of thin copper wiring was practically miraculous. When the day was over, I was surrounded by pieces of am/fm radio, an old handheld video game, and a toy car, none of which would ever be assembled again, but that really wasn’t the point. Master disassembler Todd McLellan remarks on a similar childhood discovery in his latest book, Things Come Apart from Thames & Hudson, but for him, it wasn’t fleeting like it was with me. It was the beginning of his life-long career in documenting the technological methods of modern mass production in reverse.

In Things Come Apart, McLellan exposes the inner working of 50 objects and 21,959 individual components as he reflects on the permanence of vintage machines built several decades ago—sturdy gadgets meant to be broken and repaired—versus today’s manufacturing trend of limited use followed by quick obsolescence. Captured in his photography are myriad parts laid flat and organized by function, creating recontextualized images of wagons, chainsaws, computers, and phones. He also shoots high-speed photos of carefully orchestrated drops where pieces are shot in midair as they come crashing down, creating impressive visual explosions. Also appearing in the book is his pièce de résistance: a Zenith CH 650 aircraft photographed as individual components.

The book is officially published tomorrow, but you can order it now on Amazon and Thames & Hudson. All images copyright Todd McLellan courtesy of the publisher.

Update: If you’re in Chicago, McLellan currently has an exhibition at the Museum of Science and Industry through May 19th.

Geometric Sculptures by Zachary Abel

Geometric Sculptures by Zachary Abel sculpture office objects home geometric

Geometric Sculptures by Zachary Abel sculpture office objects home geometric

Geometric Sculptures by Zachary Abel sculpture office objects home geometric

Geometric Sculptures by Zachary Abel sculpture office objects home geometric

Geometric Sculptures by Zachary Abel sculpture office objects home geometric

Using binder clips, playing cards, paperclips and many other household objects, mathematician Zachary Abel pieces together intricate geometric structures. One of his most recent pieces, the Impenetraball (top) is made from 132 binder clips and Abel suspects its sturdy enough to support his own weight (though he has yet to confirm). Dizzying mathemetical how-tos and patterns available via his website. (via make)

Incredible Peacocks Constructed from Beauty Supplies

Incredible Peacocks Constructed from Beauty Supplies sculpture objects multiples birds

Incredible Peacocks Constructed from Beauty Supplies sculpture objects multiples birds

Incredible Peacocks Constructed from Beauty Supplies sculpture objects multiples birds

Incredible Peacocks Constructed from Beauty Supplies sculpture objects multiples birds

Incredible Peacocks Constructed from Beauty Supplies sculpture objects multiples birds

Incredible Peacocks Constructed from Beauty Supplies sculpture objects multiples birds

Using fake fingernails, nail polish, barrettes, false eyelashes, jewelry, walnut, and Swarovski crystals, artist (and former park ranger!) Laurel Roth assembles these amazing peacocks. Via her website:

I use art as a medium to examine biological ramifications of human behavior. My work juxtaposes traditional craft and artisanal techniques with non-traditional materials to examine mankind’s drive to modify itself as well as its environment. By playing with the convergence of biology and product design to create new cultural artifacts, I try to question social constructions of need, design, and individual desire.

Roth’s work with animals isn’t limited to peacocks, her wooden hominid skulls are also worth a gander.

Music from a Dry Cleaner

Music from a Dry Cleaner objects music video machines

Music from a Dry Cleaner objects music video machines

Music from a Dry Cleaner objects music video machines

Sound designer and composer Diego Stocco (warning: lots of sound) continues his ongoing project of making music from uncommon objects and places with this new video using loops recorded from a local dry cleaner. Stocco has also made music from a tree, from sand, and even a a bonsai, among others. Of all of them I really think this is his finest. Make sure you make it past the 2:10 mark. (via neatorama)

Todd McLellan: Deconstructed

Todd McLellan: Deconstructed objects

Todd McLellan: Deconstructed objects

Todd McLellan: Deconstructed objects

Todd McLellan: Deconstructed objects

It seems like just last week I posted the deconstructed objects of Adam Vorhees, and now here’s the work of Todd McClellan who carefully dissects, organizes, and photographs the nostalgic objects of yesterday. Don’t miss the time-lapse video on his site. (via lustik, flavorwire)

Adam Voorhes

Adam Voorhes studio objects

Adam Voorhes studio objects

Adam Voorhes studio objects

Exploded objects by Austin-based photographer Adam Voorhes, who has an awesome bio. (via this isn’t happiness)