Tag Archives: ocean

Photographer Jorge Cervera Hauser Captures Sea Creatures Against Sun-Drenched Oceanscapes

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Jorge Cervera Hauser produces intimate snapshots of underwater creatures, effortlessly capturing their magnificence as they glide through the sea in schools or pairs. Each image displays moments that look as if they were captured in a split-second, yet simultaneously appear dramatically staged. Most of the images included were taken either in Baja or the Mexican Caribbean, and the image of the shark gliding alone through turquoise water was taken at Tiger Beach in the Bahamas. No matter the location, each photograph was taken far away from human life and miles out in the open ocean.

The Mexico City-based artist is also a film producer, yet his true passion lies with the animals he captures within his photography. Along with a few friends he runs a marine conservation NGO called Pelagic Life, which aims to conserve the Mexican open ocean through eco-tourism. Through his organization Cervera Hauser produced the documentary “Mexico Pelagico” which has already been released in Mexico and will be available on Netflix June 1st. More images of Cervera Hauser’s underwater voyages can be seen on his online portfolio here.

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Layered Glass Sculptures Mimic the Everyday Drama of the Natural World

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White Water, all images provided by K. William LeQuier

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Glass artist K. William LeQuier‘s glass work is inspired by the drama of the natural world and its everyday events. His sculptures reflect this inspiration by mimicking the natural movements of the sea and its creatures. Each sculpture is held steady by a simple black armature, a hint to the artist’s hand involved in the creation of each glass sculpture.

After years of blowing glass vessels LeQuier moved to the sandblasting process where he learned he could generate textures similar to natural erosion. In addition to forming works that appear as waves, he creates work reminiscent of sea urchins, sponges, and anemones. Most interesting about the sculptures are their layered composition, a complexity that could easily be looked over due to the high level of skill apparent in each sea-themed object.

Currently LeQuier lives and works in Vermont with his wife Mary Angus. His work can be found in the permanent collections of museums across the country including (but not limited to) the American Glass Museum, Indianapolis Art Museum, National Liberty Museum, and Philadelphia Museum of Art. (via My Modern Met)

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Crashing Glass Waves Frozen Into Elegant Vessels by Marsha Blaker and Paul DeSomma

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Photo by Paul Schraub

Husband and wife team Paul DeSomma and Marsha Blaker translate their oceanic inspirations directly into their collaborative glass sculptures, frozen glass waves caught mid-crash and appearing to spray surf from the contained vessels. The works exist as seamless gradients, dark blues circling the base while white froth circles the top of the pieces crafted from molten glass.

Although the couple works collaboratively on the vases, they also adhere to individual practices. Blaker focused on the textures and colors found within detailed marine environments while DeSomma’s work emphasizes the clarity and form of colorless and transparent glass.

The couple met at the esteemed Pilchuck Glass School in 1989, marrying shortly after and opening their studio in Live Oak, California in 2001. Together the couple is known internationally for their glass and ceramic work. (via Creative Boom and Amusing Planet)

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Photo by Paul Schraub

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Photo by Paul Schraub

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Photo courtesy Laughing Dog Gallery

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Photo courtesy Laughing Dog Gallery

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Photo by Russell Johnson

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Photo by Russell Johnson

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A Black and Blue Life: A Coal Miner Becomes a Photographer of Exquisite Waves and Seascapes

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Australian photographer Ray Collins first picked up a camera in 2007 and used it to photograph his friends surfing around his home after long shifts working in a nearby coal mine. His attention quickly shifted from his friends to patterns and forms he noticed in the waves. Collins, who is colorblind, was also drawn to the interplay of light and water, perhaps more attune to contrast than the nuance of color. He poetically refers to this switch from coal miner to fine art photographer as a balance between his “black life and blue life.”

The accolades, awards, and sponsorships have been heaped on Collins leading to the publication of his first book, Found at Sea, he also has a wide variety of prints on his website, and you can follow his photography day-to-day on Instagram. (via Laughing Squid)

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Brooding Seascapes and Marine Vessels Painted by Justyna Kopania

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Polish painter Justyna Kopania depicts melancholy seascapes and towering ships obscured by mist with liberal applications of oil paint. Crashing waves are depicted with splashes of paint, and sails are formed with the stroke of a palette knife. You can see more over on Saatchi Art and Facebook. (via MEERESSTILLE)

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An Extraordinary Macro Timelapse of Aquatic Wildlife by Sandro Bocci

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The above clip is a trailer of sorts for an upcoming non-verbal film titled Prograve by Italian filmmaker and documentarist Sandro Bocci. The feature is billed as (translated from Italian) “an experimental film orbiting scientific and philosophical reflections on time and space, and that through various shooting techniques, fields of magnification, and an exciting soundtrack, weaves a web between science and magic.” The section shown here depicts beautiful macro timelapses of coral, sponges and other aquatic wildlife filmed under ultraviolet light. You can see additional stills from the upcoming film here. Music by Maurizio Morganti. (via Vimeo Staff Picks, Coudal)

New Photographs of Crashing Ocean Waves Frozen in Time by Pierre Carreau

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Fascinated by the mysteries of the ocean his entire life, photographer Pierre Carreau (previously) documents the power and serenity of ocean waves in his now decade-long project AquaViva. After obtaining a business degree and going into IT, Carreau dramatically changed course in 2004 and moved with his family to the Caribbean island of St. Barthélemy where he now photographs waves as an artistic pursuit.

Carreau’s high-speed photos capture waves that appear frozen in time, giving them an almost sculptural appearance. “Water is amazing,” Carreau says. “Basically it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light.” More from his statement about AquaViva:

Carreau observes that the photographic images of AquaViva may sometimes be perceived as objects rather than as two-dimensional representations. The play of light off the multitude of facets and curves on the water’s surface gives the image a sculptural quality that enhances the sense of stillness and power. This simultaneous depiction of roiling movement and suspended kinetic energy parallels the dual nature of the oceans and of water itself: life-giving and yet dangerous, inviting and yet fearsome, primordial and yet ever-changing and always renewed.

Seen here is a collection of new photos from 2014 mixed with a few earlier shots we had yet to feature on Colossal, and there’s plenty more to see.

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