Tag Archives: ocean

New Species of Unusual Jellyfish Discovered 2.3 Miles Below the Ocean’s Surface 

In what looks more like a scene out of a James Cameron movie, researchers on a NOAA expedition aboard the Okeanos Explorer were filming with the help of an ROV in the Marianas Trench last week when an improbable creature suddenly popped into the frame. With just a few wiry tentacles and a cluster of 8 brightly reflective orbs inside its body, this new jellyfish looks like something from the realm of Photoshop than science. But incredibly, it’s real, living happily at 2.3 miles (~3,700 meters) underwater. From Scientific American:

Scientists believe this animal belongs to the genus Crossota, a group of jellies that does not have a sessile polyp stage; all phases of their lives are ocean drifters. They also believe this animal is an ambush predator – note the posture it had assumed in the first half of the video: its bell motionless with its tentacles outstretched like the struts of a spider’s web, waiting for something to bumble into them. The red canals, they suggest, appear to connect the bright yellow objects, which may be gonads.

You can get more photo and video updates from the Okeanos Explorer here. (via Neatorama, Scientific American)

Update: An earlier version of this article mentioned the jellyfish may be ‘bioluminescent’. While that may be true in some regard, several people with much more impressive scientific credentials than mine have written to suggest the “lights” seen inside the jellyfish in this video are merely reflective. The most likely scenario is that the gonads of this particular species exhibit some form of fluorescence but do not illuminate independently. Thanks, Steven.

jelly-2

jelly-1

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Spiraling Coral Reefs Assembled from Precisely Cut Wood by Joshua Abarbanel 

reef-8

LA-based sculptor Joshua Abarbanel fabricates wood sculptures and installations reminiscent of coral reefs comprised of concentric flower-like blooms. The artist builds both smaller standalone artworks that rest on a pedestal and larger wall or ceiling-mounted pieces that seem to grow organically in every direction. Each piece first takes shape on a computer before being cut from assorted woods with the aid of a laser cutter. From Abarbanel’s artists statement:

Finding inspiration in fractals, accretive formations, and the Fibonacci sequence, Abarbanel creates art that often simultaneously evokes microscopic and aerial perspectives, such that the compositions serve as metaphors for archetypal relationships between people, between individuals and communities, and between humankind and the planet. His work also illustrates how disparate parts can come together to make a whole in beautiful and startling ways.

Abarbanel recently opened an exhibition of work at Porch Gallery in Ojai, California through May 29, 2016. (via Hi-Fructose)

reef-1

reef-2

reef-3

reef-4

reef-5

reef-6

reef-9

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Photos of Monumental Waves Crashing in Australia by Warren Keelan 

warren-extra

Trying to capture a medium that’s in a constant state of flux would seem stressful in any situation, but photographer Warren Keelan works comfortably in a wetsuit amongst crashing waves on the South Coast of New South Wales, Australia, always trying for the perfect shot. Whether working completely submerged or perched precariously on the cusp of a behemoth swell, he’s consistently able to find the right angle and lighting to highlight the monumental power of the constantly moving ocean. He shares about his process:

I’ve always had a fascination with nature, especially the ocean and its ever changing forms, and I am compelled to capture and share what I feel are special and unique moments in the sea. I love the raw, unpredictable nature of water in motion and the way sunlight brings it all to life, from both above and below the surface. For me, the challenge is creating an image that hopefully tells a story or leaves an impression on the viewer.

Keelan has a gallery in his hometown of Wollongong, Australia, and many of his photos are avilable as prints online. You can also follow him on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

WarrenKeelan_Congeal

WarrenKeelan_Gyroscope

WarrenKeelan_Kryptonite

WarrenKeelan_Layers

WarrenKeelan_Mountainside

WarrenKeelan_SeaSnake

WarrenKeelan_SilverHelix

WarrenKeelan_Undulate

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

New Marble and Resin Lagoon Coffee Tables by Alexandre Chapelin 

LA_Table_12

All images courtesy of Alexandre Chapelin

Designer Alexandre Chapelin of LA Table (previously) has been hard at work producing more tables as a part of his Lagoon series, tables that appear as aquamarine environments with secluded beaches. His recent addition is Lagoon 55, a coffee table version of his original. These tables are formed from resin and marble which is sliced in layers in order to create the appearance of depth within the table’s sea. The resin is then poured overtop, and has a different formula at each level to give the appearance of several shades of blue.

Chapelin cannot produce two identical tables, so no work will ever be the same. This is both because of the difficulty of the tables’ form, and Chapelin’s personal belief that each piece should be completely unique. You can see more of LA Table’s work on their website.

LA_Table_13

LA_Table_11

LA_Table_10  LA_Table_07

LA_Table_06

LA_Table_05

LA_Table_04

LA_Table_03

LA_Table_02

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

New Ceramic Coral Reefs by Courtney Mattison Draw Attention to Earth’s Changing Oceans 

Aqueduct_01

“Aqueduct” (2016), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 8 x 8 x 1 feet, all images via Courtney Mattison

Aqueduct_03

“Aqueduct” (2016), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 8 x 8 x 1 feet

Doubling as an artist and ocean advocate, Courtney Mattison (previously) produces large-scale ceramic installations that draw attention to conservation of our planet’s seas. Her latest installation “Aqueduct” showcases hundreds of porcelain sea creatures including anemones, sponges, and coral sprouting from a porcelain air duct. The piece asks us to imagine the plight of these undersea creatures as tropical sea temperatures begin to rise, asking where they might migrate to once their homes have been rendered uninhabitable.

In addition to large-scale installations, Mattison also sculpts more intimate vignettes. Her series “Hope Spots” depicts areas in our seas that are critical to the overall health of the ecosystem. Each of the sculptures is a representation of one of these spots as identified by Mattison’s longtime hero and marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle.

The Denver-based artist studied marine ecology and ceramics at Skidmore College and received a Master of Arts degree in environmental studies from Brown University. Last year she was named one of the top 100 “Ocean Heroes” by Origin Magazine. Her most recent exhibition is “Sea Change” currently at the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art through April 17, 2016. You can see more of Mattison’s finished and in-progress installations on her Instagram.

Aqueduct_04

“Aqueduct” (2016), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 8 x 8 x 1 feet

Aqueduct_02

“Aqueduct” (2016), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 8 x 8 x 1 feet

HopeSpot_01

“Coral Sea II” (2015), glazed stoneware + porcelain, 17 x 16.5 x 11.5 inches

HopeSpot_02

“Chagos Archipelago II” (2015), glazed stoneware + porcelain, 17 x 16 x 9 inches

HopeSpot_03

“Outer Seychelles II” (2015), glazed stoneware, 17 x 16 x 9 inches

HopeSpot_04

“Micronesian Islands” (2015), glazed stoneware + porcelain, 17 x 17.5 x 12.5 inches

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , , .

Photographer Spends Years Documenting Immense Storm Waves that Crash Against the Porthcawl Lighthouse 

waves-1
All photos © Steve Garrington

For the last six years photographer Steve Garrington has spent countless hours documenting the oceanic events surrounding a single lighthouse in Porthcawl, Wales. Built in 1860, the lighthouse itself is pretty run-of-the-mill, but the events that unfold around it as stormy winds sweep in from the Bristol Channel are anything but ordinary. Because of the point’s unique sloped design, crashing waves are easily launched to extraordinary heights, especially during bad weather. It’s a wonder the structure is even standing after all these years. You can explore more of his photography on Flickr, specifically his waves album.

waves-9

waves-8

waves-7

waves-6

waves-5

waves-4

waves-3

waves-2

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 1 of 81234...»