Tag Archives: ocean

Brooding Seascapes and Marine Vessels Painted by Justyna Kopania

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

kopania-8

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

kopania-4

kopania-5

kopania-6

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

kopania-9

Polish painter Justyna Kopania depicts melancholy seascapes and towering ships obscured by mist with liberal applications of oil paint. Crashing waves are depicted with splashes of paint, and sails are formed with the stroke of a palette knife. You can see more over on Saatchi Art and Facebook. (via MEERESSTILLE)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

An Extraordinary Macro Timelapse of Aquatic Wildlife by Sandro Bocci

meanwhile-3

meanwhile-8

meanwhile-12

meanwhile-111

The above clip is a trailer of sorts for an upcoming non-verbal film titled Prograve by Italian filmmaker and documentarist Sandro Bocci. The feature is billed as (translated from Italian) “an experimental film orbiting scientific and philosophical reflections on time and space, and that through various shooting techniques, fields of magnification, and an exciting soundtrack, weaves a web between science and magic.” The section shown here depicts beautiful macro timelapses of coral, sponges and other aquatic wildlife filmed under ultraviolet light. You can see additional stills from the upcoming film here. Music by Maurizio Morganti. (via Vimeo Staff Picks, Coudal)

New Photographs of Crashing Ocean Waves Frozen in Time by Pierre Carreau

Carreau2209

Carreau0876

Carreau2218

Carreau3219

Carreau4678

Carreau4820

Carreau0207

Carreau5793

Carreau8606

Carreau8750

Fascinated by the mysteries of the ocean his entire life, photographer Pierre Carreau (previously) documents the power and serenity of ocean waves in his now decade-long project AquaViva. After obtaining a business degree and going into IT, Carreau dramatically changed course in 2004 and moved with his family to the Caribbean island of St. Barthélemy where he now photographs waves as an artistic pursuit.

Carreau’s high-speed photos capture waves that appear frozen in time, giving them an almost sculptural appearance. “Water is amazing,” Carreau says. “Basically it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light.” More from his statement about AquaViva:

Carreau observes that the photographic images of AquaViva may sometimes be perceived as objects rather than as two-dimensional representations. The play of light off the multitude of facets and curves on the water’s surface gives the image a sculptural quality that enhances the sense of stillness and power. This simultaneous depiction of roiling movement and suspended kinetic energy parallels the dual nature of the oceans and of water itself: life-giving and yet dangerous, inviting and yet fearsome, primordial and yet ever-changing and always renewed.

Seen here is a collection of new photos from 2014 mixed with a few earlier shots we had yet to feature on Colossal, and there’s plenty more to see.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Ocean Gravity: Spectacular Footage of Freediver Guillaume Nery Flying through Swift Ocean Currents North of Tahiti

diving-1

diving-2

diving-3

Filmed late last year by director and underwater cameraman Julie Gautier, this amazing footage shows free diver Guillaume Néry as he’s carried by swift currents through Tiputa pass, part of the Rangiroa atoll about 355 km Northeast of Tahiti. When you hear about strong currents near the ocean or large lakes, it’s difficult to visualize exactly how they work, or the power they carry. This film should quickly put those mysteries to rest. The speeds Néry reaches in this video seem almost impossible without the help of equipment or flippers. You can see some behind-the-scenes footage and read a bit more (in French) on their website. Gautier and Nery previously collaborated on this bone-chilling “base jump” into Dean’s Blue Hole in 2010.

Porcelain Dishware Covered with Marine Life by Mary O’Malley

malley-2

malley-1

malley-3

malley-4

malley-5

malley-6

malley-7

malley-8

New York-based artist Mary O’Malley (previously) continues her fantastic amalgamations of porcelain dishware encrusted with ocean life titled Bottom Feeders. Like any object resting on the ocean floor, her sculptures have become increasingly swarmed by flora and fauna over the years, with some of her most recent pieces appearing wholly consumed by coral, seaweed, crustaceans, and tentacles. O’Malley creates everything you see by hand, the teapots and other dishes are thrown and hand-built porcelain, to which she adds sculpted wildlife coated with red iron oxide. You can see more of her recent work on Facebook and Instagram.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young

Canoe_closeup

Canoe_1

Canoe_4

LonesomeLight_1

LonesomeLight_closeup_3

LonesomeLight_closeup2

Deserted_3

Deserted_closeup

ben-extra-1

ben-extra-2

NewLandsII_2

Sculptor Ben Young (previously) just unveiled a collection of new glass sculptures prior to the Sculpture Objects Functional Art + Design (SOFA) Fair in Chicago next month. Young works with laminated clear float glass atop cast concrete bases to create cross-section views of ocean waves that look somewhat like patterns in topographical charts. The self-taught artist is currently based in Sydney but was raised in Waihi Beach, New Zealand, where the local landscape and surroundings greatly inspired his art. You can learn more about his sculptures over on Kirra Galleries, and follow him on Facebook.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Ocean Atlas: A Massive Submerged Girl Carries the Weight of the Ocean

decaires-hero

jason-2

jason-3

jason-4

jason-6

jason-5

Installed earlier this month on the western coastline of New Providence in Nassau, Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas,” is the lastest underwater sculpture by artist Jason deCaires Taylor (previously), known for his pioneering effort to build submerged sculpture parks in oceans around the world. Taylor’s cement figures are constructed with a sustainable pH-neutral material that encourages the growth of coral and other marine wildlife, effectively forming an artificial reef that draws tourists away from diving hotspots in over-stressed areas.

Towering 18 feet tall and weighing in at more than 60 tons, Ocean Atlas is reportedly the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater. The artwork depicts a local Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the ocean above her in reference to the Ancient Greek myth of Atlas, the primordial Titan who held up the celestial spheres. The piece was commissioned by B.R.E.E.F (Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation), as part of an ongoing effort to build an underwater sculpture garden in honor of its founder, Sir Nicholas Nuttal. You can see a bit more over on Atlas Obscura and at the Creator’s Project, who are working on a documentary about the piece.

Update: Creator’s Project just published their coverage of Ocean Atlas.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 1 of 41234