Tag Archives: octopi

Elaborate Bronze Memorial Dedicated to Staten Island Ferry Octopus Attack Tricks Tourists 

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Monuments and vaguely descriptive plaques are commonplace around cities and heavily trafficked tourist areas, giving just enough insight into an historic event or landmark. The Staten Island Ferry Disaster Memorial blends in with these weathered monuments, except for the fact that all details on the work are completely false. The monument, which is located in Battery Park, Manhattan, was created by artist Joe Reginella and honors the 400 victims who perished during a giant octopus attack of a Staten Island ferry named the Cornelius G. Kolff on November 22, 1963, the same day as the assassination of JFK.

The elaborate hoax was six months in the making, and is also seen by Reginella as a multimedia art project and social experiment. The website, and fliers distributed around Manhattan by his team, give a false location for a museum, ironically a place you must get to by ferry. You can see more tourist reactions and find real information about the fake event on the Staten Island Ferry Octopus Disaster Memorial Museum’s Facebook. (via Hi-Fructose)

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An Octopus Painted With 95-Million-Year-Old Ink 

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Esther van Hulsen at work on an octopus drawing using 95 million-year-old ink. Photo by Stian Steinsli

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Photo of the fossil on the left by Hans Arne Nakrem, photo of the powder on the right by Esther van Hulsen.

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Image of the completed octopus ink drawing. Photo by Esther van Hulsen

Dutch wildlife artist Esther van Hulsen was recently given an assignment unlike her typical drawings of birds and mammals from life—a chance to draw a prehistoric octopus 95 million years after its death. Paleontologist Jørn Hurum supplied Hulsen with ink extracted from a fossil found in Lebanon in 2009, received as a gift from the PalVenn Museum in 2014. After several millennia Hulson was surprised to find that the color had remained so vibrant, preserved all of this time in the cephalopod’s ink sac. “Knowing that this animal has used this ink to survive is absolutely amazing,” said van Hulsen of the prehistoric ink.

The idea to make such a drawing came from the story of Mary Anning, an English paleontologist and fossil collector who made a similar drawing from a fossil’s ink sac in the 1800s. Hulsen’s replication of the octopus now hangs beside its material origin in the Natural History Museum in Oslo. (via MetaFilter)

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A Gargantuan Octopus Rendered with Discarded Ballpoint Pens by Ray Cicin 

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Inspired in part by his graphic-designer friends disparaging comments about the lowly ballpoint pen, artist Ray Cicin took it upon himself to collect all their discarded pens and embarked on this drawing of a mammoth octopus. The piece is inspired by German naturalist Ernst Haeckel’s famous illustration of squid and octopi, and is part of Cicin’s ongoing Deep Blue series. You can follow more of his work on Instagram.

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Deep Blue, Octopus. Ballpoint pen on archival Bee Rag paper, 62 x 64 inches

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An Octopus Typewriter by Courtney Brown 

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As part of the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art’s annual California Sculpture SLAM, Oakland artist Courtney Brown unveiled this unweildly typing device titled “Self Organization,” that went on to win first place. Brown used a 1938 Underwood typewriter affixed with sculpted bronze tentacles. We can’t wait to read its first book. All of the sculptures from the event are still on view through November 15, 2015.

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The Octographer: An Octopus Was Trained to Take Photographs of Aquarium Visitors in Just Three Tries 

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The octopus is a fascinating creature. And its well-documented intellect has led more and more scientists to believe that humans may not be alone in their ability to comprehend and solve challenging problems. In addition to opening jars and predicting the outcomes of soccer matches, we can now add ‘taking photographs’ to the ongoing list of skills these 8-legged invertebrate can learn.

To promote their water-resistant camera, Sony recently teamed up with the Sea Life Aquarium in New Zealand to teach an octopus named Rambo to take pictures of visitors from inside her tank. The camera was mounted on her tank “When we first tried to get her to take a photo, it only took three attempts for her to understand the process,” said one of the trainers. “That’s faster than a dog. Actually it’s faster than a human in some instances.” (via PetaPixel)

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An Octopus Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye 

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Artist Keng Lye whose work we explored earlier this year recently completed a new painting that blends sculpture and layers of acrylic paint to create this near lifelike red octopus. Lye often uses an egg shell to form the body of his cephalopods which then merges seamlessly with alternating layers of resin and acrylic to create an incredible sense of depth and dimensions. If you liked this, also check out the work of Riusuke Fukahori. All photos courtesy the artist. (via My Modern Met)

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