Tag Archives: oil paint

Mimesis: New Anatomical Paintings Depicting Flora and Fauna by Nunzio Paci 

Bologna-based Italian artist Nunzio Paci (previously here and here) produces hauntingly detailed paintings that combine anatomical renderings with multi-colored blossoms and leaves. His latest series, Mimesis, is inspired by the idea of species evolving together over time, and the similarities shared by different organisms in order to better adapt to predators and climate.

“The concept, deriving from Plato and Aristotle’s theory on reality and imitation, draws inspiration from the natural phenomenon of mimicry in evolutionary biology and gives it a broader meaning,” Paci explained to Colossal. “In Mimesis, flora and fauna not only copy one another, they enmesh themselves in each other’s existence forming a cohesive organism, in an attempt to take shelter from the totality of the outside world.”

Within the series fauna helps to protect flora, creating a symbiotic relationship through the included animals’ death and rebirth. Flowers fill the hallows of presented carcasses while leaves grow to surround and overtake human skulls.

Paci recently exhibited these works as part of a solo show titled Mimesis at Galerie Stephanie in Manilla, Philippines and is currently a part of the group exhibition Dark Nature at Last Rites Gallery in New York City. You can see more of his work on Instagram and Facebook.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Monochromatic Portraits Obscured by Colorful Abstract Markings by Guim Tió Zarraluki 

Barcelona-based artist Guim Tió Zarraluki paints pieces tied to memory and how it is obscured over time, covering the faces of his subjects in bright swaths of oil paint. His research as of late has brought him to topics such as how things slip into oblivion or are saved forever on our technological devices, areas which are abstractly displayed within his work.

In his latest series No Name Project, the individuals have minimal lines that mark their faces’, while in Now, Remember swirls and concentric circles take over the entirety of each visage. You can see more of his portraits from past series on his Instagram and Facebook.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Nathan Walsh’s Unusual Urban Landscapes Painted Atop Precise Graphite Sketches 

switch-6

Trying to pin down exactly what makes these urban landscape paintings by British artist Nathan Walsh (previously) so unusual is difficult, in part because of the variety of techniques he employs to get from a vision in his mind to the final, exacting artwork.

Starting with his own photographic references, Walsh first draws an elaborate blueprint of sorts by establishing a horizon line and a host of perspective strategies that varies from piece to piece. This is followed by several months of painting with oils to achieve the final landscape that appears to be a strange hybrid of both illustrative and photorealistic styles. Photography, architecture, and painting converge to create a “painted world which in some ways resembles the world we live in,” says Walsh. “The work aims to create credible and convincing space which whilst making reference to our world, displays its own distinct logic.”

Walsh is currently preparing for a group show titled “Cityscape Paintings: Looking from the Outside In” at Bernarducci Meisel Gallery in October, followed by a solo show during the same period in 2016. You can follow more of his work in progress on Facebook.

walsh-5

walsh-6

walsh-1

walsh-2

walsh-8

studio

switch-2

carouse-2up

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Birds and Fauna Sprout From Nunzio Paci’s New Graphite and Oil Anatomical Renderings 

nunzio-paci-2015-13

Taking the analogy comparing blood vessels and tree branches literally, Nunzio Paci (previously) creates oil and graphite paintings that connect humans back to nature. Paci’s works look almost straight from a medical textbook except for one flaw—the trees and animals that sprout from his subjects’ mouths, chests, and necks. Paci ultimately takes a painterly approach to his works, paint dripping down the canvas to add balance to his extreme detail.

Paci’s practice centers on the relationship between man and nature, especially focusing on the visual overlap of our intrinsic and extrinsic systems. The beautiful and minimally colored works could be interpreted as extremely morbid—Paci showing us our ultimate fate when nature takes over.

Paci lives and works in Italy. His last exhibition was titled In the Garden of Idne at Oxholm Gallery in Copenhagen this past January.

nunzio-paci-2015-13-2

paci_01

paci_02

paci_07

paci_06

paci_08

paci_09

nunzio-paci-48

nunzio-paci-50

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .