Posts tagged
with origami


Elaborate Paper Origami Tessellations and Kusudamas by Ekaterina Lukasheva

February 21, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Moscow-based paper artist Ekaterina Lukasheva first tried folding paper at the age of 14 when a mathematics professor brought in a book on kusudamas. The traditional paper sphere technique requires an understanding of geometry to ensure the individual units fit together perfectly with the help of glue or string. A few years later she began to explore much more complicated designs like tessellations, aided by a university degree in mathematics and programming. Through her experimentation and commitment Lukasheva has become so proficient with paper that she’s authored several DIY books featuring some of her original designs. You can follow more of her work on Flickr and Instagram. (via Twisted Sifter)



Art Craft Food

Japanese Tip: An Exhibition of 8,000 Chopstick Sleeve Sculptures Left Behind at Restaurants

December 19, 2017

Johnny Strategy

Yuki Tatsumi was working as a waiter in a restaurant when one day, as he was cleaning up a table, he noticed that a customer had intricately folded up the paper chopstick sleeve and left it behind. Japan doesn’t have a culture of tipping but Tatsumi imagined that this was a discreet, subconscious method of showing appreciation. He began paying attention and sure enough noticed that other customers were doing the same thing. Tatsumi began collecting these “tips” which eventually led to his art project: Japanese Tip.

Since 2012, Tatsumi has not only been collecting his own tips but he’s reached out to restaurants and eateries all across Japan communicating his concept and asking them to send him their tips. The response has been enormous. He’s collected over 13,000 paper sculptures that range from obscure and ugly to intricate and elaborate.

left at a restaurant in Kochi

Earlier this month, Tatsumi staged an exhibition in Tokyo where he displayed 8,000 of some of the most interesting sculptures sourced from all 47 prefectures around Japan. “Japanese Tip is a project between restaurants and customers,” says Tatsumi, “to communicate the ‘appreciation for food’ and ‘appreciation of the service’ by using the most common material used at any Japanese restaurant.”

The exhibition has since closed but you can see some of the paper sculptures on his website and you can follow the initiative on Facebook. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

left at a cafe in Mie




Cristian Marianciuc Creates a New Decorated Origami Paper Crane Daily for 1,000 Days

December 7, 2017

Christopher Jobson

When we last mentioned origami enthusiast Cristian Marianciuc he had just completed the creative challenge of designing a new decorative origami crane daily for 365 days. But then… he didn’t stop. For nearly three years, Marianciuc continued to produce a vast flock of 1,000 paper birds decorated with all manner of leaves, beads, thread, flowers, feathers, and other materials too numerous to list. You can explore all of them on Instagram and a few of his paper works are available on Etsy.




Nano Origami: Infinitesimal Folded Paper Creations by Anja Markiewicz

October 24, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Leipzig-based paper artist Anja Markiewicz uses little more than tip of a toothpick (she doesn’t even use a magnifying glass) to make the tiny creases in her miniature origami creations including animals, insects, and geometric designs. Collected here a number of pieces from the last few years, and you can find more in this gallery and in her online shop.



Amazing Art Craft

Origami Inception: Paper Artist Folds Four Works From a Single Sheet of Paper

October 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Vietnamese paper artist Nguyen Hung Cuong (previously) just unveiled this new origami work titled “Fly High, Dreamers!” that incorporates four sequential objects—a hand holding a crane with a rider also holding a smaller crane—each connected to the other, all from a single uncut sheet of paper. “I created this work to show my deep gratitude to origami community,” Cuong shares. “The boy is myself, and the hand represents all origami creators who inspired me, making my dream come true.” The piece is on view at the Jaffa Museum in Tel Aviv as part of the current Paper Heroes show.




Origami Animals Bound Across Walls in Murals by ‘Annatomix’ 

August 18, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Annatomix, a self-taught painter from Birmingham UK, creates geometric, origami-inspired animals on everyday materials of all sizes. Bumblebees and rabbits take shape on small surfaces like discarded paper bags and wood scraps, while foxes and peregrine falcons scale the sides of buildings. Crafted in acrylic and spray paint, pastels, graphite, and ink, her animal renderings balance a fantastical element while also responding to the environment they are painted into.

The artist’s lifelong interest in science, history, religion and philosophy have lead to her current body of work, which is “centered on nature of science and its connection with spirituality. I am using sacred geometry as the starting point to explore a broad range of themes that include; the creation of the universe,  evolution and extinction, repetition and cycles in history, the illusion of reality,” as she describes on her website.

Annatomix’s newest murals will go up this week in Sweden as a part of the street art Artscape Festival and you can see recent in-progress and finished work on her Instagram. Many of her smaller pieces are also for sale on her website.



Design Science

MIT Developed a Fabric That Can Fold Into Origami-Like Shapes When Inflated

August 10, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

MIT Media Lab's Tangible Media Group has created a system to fold materials into various origami shapes when inflated, turning specifically designed paper, plastic, and fabric into representations of swans, helixes, or other 3D figures with minimal human interaction. The project, aeroMorph, utilizes special software to program the geometry needed for each three-dimensional shape and exports the information as digital fabrication files. After this, specific markings are heat-sealed onto the provided material on a large robotic platform, allowing it to bend at specific joints when filled with a steady stream of air.

The creators believe aeroMorph could be applied to future wearables, toys, robotics, and automated packaging. You can see the results from several of the project’s self-folding experiments in the video below. (via Laughing Squid)