Tag Archives: origami

Origami Enthusiast Designs a New Paper Crane Daily for 365 Days 

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At the beginning of 2015, origami enthusiast Cristian Marianciuc challenged himself to create a new origami crane daily for 365 days. Marianciuc says each piece is influenced by the day he’s having, a sort of visual record of the moment set against the folded backdrop of a paper bird. The whimsical cranes are generally more decorative rather than exploring folding techniques, but it doesn’t make them any less fun to look at. To see more, he posts everyday on Instagram. (via Geyser of Awesome)

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A Self-Folding Origami Robot That Can Walk, Climb, Dig, Carry, Swim and Dissolve into Nothing 

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Scientists at MIT have pulled up a very tiny curtain on their newest invention: a 1.7cm square robot capable of assembling itself like a piece of origami. The Untethered Miniature Origami Robot is powered by a small neodymium magnet and four electromagnetic coils underneath the robot’s surface that create magnet fields necessary for it to operate. The small robot can walk on different surfaces, climb, carry objects twice its own weight, swim in shallow water, burrow, and it even completely dissolves in an acetone solution leaving behind just the magnet.

So what can we do with super tiny self-folding robots? Researchers hope to develop even smaller autonomous robots with additional sensors that can dissolve in water. Such tiny devices could have a variety of medical uses when introduced inside of a human body, maybe zapping cancer cells or cleaning clogged arteries. You can read more about it over at IEEE and in this research paper. (via Laughing Squid)

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Wet Fold Origami Technique Gives Wavy Personality to Paper Animals by Artist Hoang Tien Quyet 

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Often one associates origami with sharp and precise folds, miniature works that have a crisp perfection. Origami artist Hoang Tien Quyet shies away from this rigidity, instead folding his small objects with a technique called “wet-folding,” which allows curves to be created instead of the typical straight lines. With this technique Vietnam-based Quyet creates posed animals bounding with personality, their heads tilted and wings ready for flight.

The technique of wet folding was created by the late origami master Akira Yoshizawa, and involves dampening the paper so it easily accepts folds. Wet-folding gives the paper works a more realistic appearance, adds a rounded quality to the origami, and allows it to appear malleable even though the pieces dry into hardened forms. Wet-folding also involves using a thicker paper, as traditional origami paper would easily tear if wet.

Quyet is co-author of two books, “50 hours Origami +” and “VOG2 – origami.vn,” both published by Passion Origami. Quyet’s skill and has lead to him being invited to several international origami conventions, including Germany, France, Italy, and Japan. You can see more images of Quyet’s animals on his Flickr. (via My Modern Met)

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A Flock of Synchronized Dancing Origami Cranes on an Electromagnetic Stage 

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Not content with boring old inanimate origami, Japanese designer and maker Ugoita T. assembled this clever electromagnetic stage to bring his paper cranes to life. While the idea of moving paper creations around with magnets is fun, it’s the synchronization that really makes this hilarious. (via Digg)

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DIY Kinetic Origami Sculpture Designed by Jo Nakashima 

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Partially inspired by Erik Åberg’s interlocking kinetic cube system Ghostcubes, Brasil-based origami artist Jo Nakashima created a method for building a similar object using a system of 40 paper cubes. For those of you ambitious enough to give it a try he shared a set of instructions on Instructables. Just 45 steps!

If you’re not familiar with Nakashima, he runs the most popular instructional origami channel on YouTube, with some of his videos racking up over 13 million views. (via Instructables)

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