Tag Archives: packaging

Polluted Water Popsicles: Faux Frozen Treats Highlight Taiwan’s Water Pollution Problem 

via @bebeelai

via @bebeelai

Focused on environmental change rather than flavor, art students Hung I-chen, Guo Yi-hui, and Cheng Yu-ti from the National Taiwan University of the Arts concocted a line of “frozen treats” titled Polluted Water Popsicles. The group collected polluted water from 100 locations in Taiwan, first freezing the collected sewage samples and then preserving their creations in polyester resin.

At first glance the visually pleasing treats seem to imitate the aesthetic of recent craft and artisanal food trends. However on closed inspection you can identify the trash contained within each mold—bits of plastic, bottle caps, and wrappers lying within the popsicles’ murky waters.

The project is intended to spread awareness about water pollution and its deep effect on our world’s population. The 100 pieces, which also included designed wrappers, was nominated for the Young Pin Design Award and featured in the New Generation of Design Exhibition this May at the Taipei World Trade Center. You can view more of the creatively designed inedible works in the video below. More information about the project can be found on the group’s Facebook. (via Mashable and Quartz)

via @fengfeng210

via @fengfeng210

via @_rokaro_

via @_rokaro_

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Printed Short Stories That Double as Wine Bottle Labels 

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All images via Reverse Innovation

Combining two of my favorite winter (or rather any season) activities is the project Librottiglia, a newly designed set of wines which feature short stories built into their labels. The texts are printed on textured paper stock, minimally designed, and secured to the bottle with a single piece of twine, providing an alternative to both digital methods of reading and traditional books. Not only are the selected works aesthetically matched to the bottle, but the content is also curated to align with the taste profiles, the characteristics of the work conceptually paired to each blend.

Three writers were selected to contribute to the project, each bringing their unique style to their matched wine. Journalist and satirist Danilo Zanelli contributes the mystery “Murder” to a Roero Arneis, “The Frog in the Belly,” a fable by Patrizia Laquidara is paired with an Anthos, and Regina Marques Nadaes’s love story “I Love You, Forget Me” compliments the winery’s Nebbiolo Roero.

The project is a partnership between the product design agency Reverse Innovation and Italian winery Matteo Correggia, and is named based off of the Italian translations of the words book (libro) and bottle (bottiglia). You can learn more about the project on Librottiglia’s website. (via designboom)

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New Birds Painted on Pharmaceutical Packaging by Sara Landeta 

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Artist Sara Landeta (previously) continues to use the back of used medicine packaging as a canvas for depictions of various birds. The artist most recently created a series of 120 paintings for her exhibition titled “Medicine as Metaphor” at gallery 6mas1 last year. From the Jealous Curator about the poignancy of the series:

The project includes a collection of 120 boxes of drugs that have been consumed by different patients to overcome their illnesses. All boxes are illustrated inside with a broad classification of birds from different families, being the only animal that although it gives it a meaning of freedom, because it is the only one able to connect with the earth and the sky, is also one of the main animals in captivity. This juxtaposition of the natural and the synthetic interprets the patient as a captive animal, and the bird as its metaphor.

Draw a collection of birds inside these boxes holding a single reflection ; l will learn to be birds in captivity, but they are wanting to fly, and that is what keeps them alive.

You can see more of Landeta’s paintings here. (via The Jealous Curator)

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Rubber Bands with a Bow: The Art of Japanese Packaging Simplified 

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Japanese design is often focused on adding engaging design to unexpected places, subtly nudging the audience to look twice at everyday objects from erasers to lunch boxes. Designer Yu Aso has placed this idea into one of the most common packaging elements—rubber bands.

Aso has reimagined rubber bands with a mizuhiki twist, a Japanese art form using cords tied with decorative knots. The most common of these is the shoelace knot, which he has effortlessly worked into a rubber band that is appropriately named the mizuhikiband. The band was was originally created as part of the 2013 Kokuyo Design Awards with the theme of “happy x design,” but has since gone through two years of revisions to refine the design and make the product more foreigner-friendly.

It was also important to Aso that the band have a sense of repetition in its design, encouraging users to use the product over and over again to secure a variety of gifts.

Mizuhikibands will be available in four different colors and packaged in groups of 7 beginning in early October. (via Spoon & Tamago)

Update: Mizuhikibands are now available in the U.S. through the Spoon & Tamago Shop.

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Generic Plastic Bubble Wrap Transformed into Mini Goldfish Bowls by Daisuke Akiyama 

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Created by Tokyo-based designer Daisuke Akiyama, this packaging concept effectively turns the small air pockets of plastic bubble wrap into miniature fish bowls. Akiyama says the novel idea is an attempt to make the irresistible plastic bubbles “psychologically more difficult to pop.” Currently the idea is just a prototype, but supposedly he’s working on marketing the idea to a manufacturer. (via NOTCOT, Spoon & Tamago)

Update: Many have questioned if the fish used in the concept are real. They are not. These are images printed inside plastic bubbles.

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