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Art

Chaotic Swarms of Flowers and Birds Inhabit New Paintings by Collin van der Sluijs

June 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The last party" (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

“The last party” (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

In his latest solo exhibition, No ConcessionsCollin van der Sluijs (previously) combined acrylic, ink, and spray paint to produce dreamlike portraits of invented characters who each interact with chaotic elements of nature. A skeleton wearing a small brimmed hat extends a hand to a pair of airborne birds, while a mass of flowers and vines consume the head of a suited figure like a locust swarm. Chaos is also seen in the works without human subjects, such as his work Spring which showcases two rabbits dueling over a roaring flame.

No Concessions runs through June 23, 2018 at Vertical Gallery in Chicago. You can see a combination of van der Sluijs’s street art and gallery exhibitions on his Instagram.

"Swarm" (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

“Swarm” (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

"Failures 1.0" (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

“Failures 1.0” (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

"Bloom and decay" (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

“Bloom and decay” (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

"Spring" (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 110 inches

“Spring” (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 110 inches

Left: “Floater” (2017), Watercolor and Ink on 300 Grams Paper, 24 x 19 ¾ inches. Right: “Trespassing” (2017), Watercolor and Ink on 300 Grams Paper, 24 x 19 ¾ inches

Untitled 07 (2018), Watercolor and Ink on 300 Grams Paper, 8 ½ x 11 ½ inches. Right: Untitled 06 (2018), Watercolor and Ink on 300 Grams Paper, 8 ½ x 11 ½ inches

Install view of Collin van der Sluijs’s solo exhibition “No Concessions” at Vertical Gallery

 

 



Art

Surreal Paintings by Matthew Grabelsky Take the New York City Subway for a Wild Ride

June 12, 2018

Andrew LaSane

New York City is sometimes affectionately (or disaffectionately) referred to as a “concrete jungle,” but for Los Angeles-based artist Matthew Grabelsky it’s more of a big cageless zoo. Using the New York City subway system as the setting for his work, Grabelsky paints surreal portraits of people who are seemingly normal from the neck down, but who have had their heads replaced by animals, both wild and domesticated.

Having grown up in New York and being fascinated by the imagery of Greek mythology as a kid, Grabelsky’s paintings are an exploration of human nature and of the way that animals represent various parts of the human subconscious. “The characters are symbolic of the kinds of thoughts that lie under the surface of people’s minds, and they reveal that the most extraordinary can exist in the most ordinary of everyday settings,” the artist told Prohbtd in an interview. “This theme is communicated through the juxtaposition of these ostensibly irrational images with otherwise completely mundane scenes. My idea is that my creatures are not original but are ultimately part of a much larger cultural continuum.”

Since graduating Cum Laude from Rice University in 2002 with a BA in Art and Art History (and a BS in Astrophysics), Matthew Grabelsky has shown in dozens of group exhibitions and solo shows around the world. In 2017 he was tapped by electronic musician Moby to paint an album cover featuring a father cow reading a book to his calf. To see more of Grabelsky’s work, follow him on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Fierce Feathered Portraits of Brooding Birds by Josie Morway

May 29, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Josie Morway creates fierce portraits of wildlife set in abstracted apocalyptic environments and interspersed with geometric linework, colorful paint drips, and mysterious Latin text. Morway often features birds in her oil and enamel paintings, using the graceful shapes of the animals’ elongated necks and sweeping wings to draw the viewer’s eye around the artwork. Many of Morway’s works also interweave plants: ferns, succulents, and blossoming flowers emerge from around her animal subjects’ bodies.

The artist shares with Colossal that the Latin lettering that embellishes some of her paintings is heavily abstracted from old mottos. “I don’t mean for them to be read too literally, but rather hope they lend a certain feeling of portentousness to the pieces,” Morway explains. “I like referencing religious icon paintings and other forms of ‘serious’ historic painting, but using animals and birds in the place of saints, etc. I’m going for the feeling of narrative realism, but working with a narrative that’s mysterious, missing some information, open to the viewer’s interpretation.”

Morway will have a piece on view at Antler Gallery in Portland starting June 9, 2018, as part of PDX/LAX II, a collaborative exhibit with Los Angeles gallery Thinkspace Projects, as well as a two person show in October. You can also find her work in Australia at Beinart Gallery’s group show starting July 13. The artist shares updates on her work via Instagram.

 

 



Art

Satirical Images of Virtue and Vice Painted by Toni Hamel

May 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The Impostor (George's Zebra)" (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches, all images via Toni Hammel

“The Impostor (George’s Zebra)” (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches, all images via Toni Hammel

Toronto-based artist Toni Hamel works across mediums to create drawings, paintings, and sculptures that analyze human behavior. In her two-dimensional work the artist often incorporates animals and icebergs being treated as art objects by men in lab coats and smocks. The male subjects are seen analyzing or altering the zebras, giraffes, and whales, painting over their spots or pinning on stripes with a marked precision.

Hamel describes her art practice as an “illustrated commentary of human frailties,” seeking to highlight peculiar behavior in humans. “Drawing from personal experiences and outward observations, I point to historical, social, and psychological references,” she tells Colossal. “Virtues and vices, the holy and the profane, the good and the bad, all share equal weight and supply as infinite source material for my investigations.”

Hamel received her BFA from the Accademia di Belle Arti of Lecce in 1983, and a post-graduate certificate in Computer Graphics from Sheridan College in 1991. You can see more of her satirical works on human behavior on her website and Instagram.

"The Heist" (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches

“The Heist” (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches

"The Watch" (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x1.5 inches

“The Watch” (2017), oil and alkyd on cradled panel, 24 x 24 x1.5 inches

"Now You See Me" (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

“Now You See Me” (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

"Opening night"(2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

“Opening night”(2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

"The Pretender" (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

“The Pretender” (2016), oil on Arches oil paper, 15 x 22 inches

"Ceci n'est pas un arbre (pour Charlie)" (2016), oil on canvas, 16 x 20 inches

“Ceci n’est pas un arbre (pour Charlie)” (2016), oil on canvas, 16 x 20 inches

"Weathermen" (2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

“Weathermen” (2016), oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

 

 



Art

Unusual Animals Brought Together in New Hyperrealistic Paintings by Lisa Ericson

May 16, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Flock

New work from Lisa Ericson (previously) continues the Portland-based artist’s hyperrealistic compositions of animals. Set on deep black backgrounds, her paintings showcase unusual combinations of peacefully co-existing fauna. Pelicans support rabbits, snakes, and ocelots, while tree frogs and songbirds find homes on the shells of turtles. Her most recent paintings are on view through May 25 at Antler Gallery in Portland, in a show titled Invisible Promise, alongside work from Scottish artist Lindsey Carr. You can see more from Ericson on Instagram.

After The Flood

Stowaway

Distant Shore

Uneasy Truce

Oasis

Haven

 

 



Art Illustration

Quiet Scenes of Youthful Melancholy and Mystery by Aron Wiesenfeld

May 3, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

The Well, oil on canvas, 67 x 83 in.

In his dreamlike paintings, Aron Wiesenfeld depicts scenes of young women in moments of hushed reflection. Wiesenfeld’s artworks are often set outside in softly illuminated environments at twilight or dusk. Youthful female figures quietly observe their surroundings or are poised at the edge of entering a new realm. In an interview with Juxtapoz, Wiesenfeld describes how he finds and processes inspiration:

Ideas come from anywhere… places, memories, movies, art, etc. A book called Art and Fear said, ‘Notice what you notice.’ I thought that was great advice. So many times something that flashed by my consciousness might be lost just as quickly. There is a kind of discipline to saying, ‘Wait, there was something interesting there, what was it?’ Memory is so transitory… I want to get to my sketchbook as quickly as I can.

Wiesenfeld studied at The Cooper Union and ArtCenter College of Design and currently resides in San Diego, California. His upcoming solo show will be at Arcadia Contemporary in New York in 2019. Wiesenfeld occasionally offers signed print editions of his paintings via his website, and he has also published a book which compiles the last fifteen years of his artworks. You can stay up to date on new paintings and drawings via Instagram and Facebook. (via Arrested Motion)

Bunker, 2016, oil on linen, 32.5 x 44.5 in.

Homecoming, 2014, oil on canvas, 26.5 x 34 in.

Winter Cabin, oil on canvas, 30 x 41 in.

Bride, 2014, oil on canvas, 26.25 x 39.5 in.

God of the Forest, 2014, oil on canvas, 39.25 x 28 in.

October, 2014, oil on canvas, 22.75 x 35 in.

The Off Season, 2016, oil on linen, 26 x 33 in.

Night Grove, 2016, oil on panel, 19 x 24 in.

 

 



Art

Narrative Dramas Unfold in Robert Proch’s Multi-Dimensional Glitched Paintings and Murals

April 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Robert Proch combines the aesthetics of street art and fine art in his dizzyingly complex paintings and murals. The artist engages multiple perspectives, glitched repetitions of figures, architectural motifs, and tightly controlled color palettes to create his distinctive style. Scenes tend to radiate out from a central perspective point, surrounded by abstracted shapes and atmospheric brushstrokes.

Proch’s artist statement describes his work as mini-narratives that “examine the modern human condition using vivid colors and tangible emotions. Sentimentality, ambition, fear, loss, hubris, greed, and friendship play their roles in snapshot dramas.”

The artist studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Poznan, Poland, which is where he currently resides. Proch also explores his signature style in the mediums of drawing and wood bas-relief sculpture, which you can view on his website and Instagram. (via Booooooom)

 

 

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