Tag Archives: painting

Famous Oil Paintings Add a Modern Twist to Limited Edition Boards


Famous oil paintings cover the surface of limited edition boards in both triptych and diptych variations in Boom-art and UWL's newest collaboration. The French skate and surf gallery teamed up with surf company UWL to produce the ‘504’ series that includes the work of Jan Davidsz. de heem (1606-1684), Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516), Jan van Huysum (1682-1749), and more.

The centuries old twist adds a modern pop of rich colors and patterns to the surf and skateboards, each board handmade and individually numbered by UWL. For the series, each skateboard has been produced in an edition of 80, and the surfboards come in an edition of just 10. (via Designboom and This Isn’t Happiness)






See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

The Nameless Paint Set: An Alternative Way of Understanding Color





As companies like Crayola dream up more inventive and brandable colors for their crayons like “inchworm” or “mango tango,” a young designer duo from Japan created this alternative way of exploring colors by doing away with names altogether. Nameless Paints are a set of 10 paint tubes designed by Yusuke Imai and Ayami Moteki that replace more familiar color names (which can be a tad more ambiguous, see: “jazzbery jam!”) with visual depictions of the primary colors magenta, yellow, and cyan mixed inside. The visual labeling system also relies on proportion to depict more or less of different colors to create additional shades of green, orange, or blue.

“By not assigning names to the colors we want to expand the definition of what a color can be, and the various shades they can create by mixing them,” says Imai.

While using written names may ultimately prove more useful (and more fun) in the long run, Nameless Paints are a fun way to explore how color works. The design originally won a 2012 Kokuyo Design Award, and has undergone refinements over the last few years. The set finally go on sale in October of 2015 in Japan for roughly $15. (via Spoon & Tamago)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

100-Year-Old Footage of Legendary Artists Monet, Renoir, Rodin, and Degas Working and Walking Near Their Studios

Three clips from 1915 and one from 1919 show legendary artists within their celebrated environments—Claude Monet creating work in his garden at Giverny, Pierre-Auguste Renoir painting at home, Auguste Rodin sculpting in his studio, and Edgar Degas taking a leisurely stroll through the streets of Paris. Each of the silent short films showcases the artists instead of the work we have come to associate them with, cameras focusing on the men rather than canvas or sculpture. The cinematic choice is an interesting one, giving us a peak at the techniques and facial expressions of the artist instead of any expression made within the work. (via Neatorama)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Artist Nelson Makamo’s Dynamic Portraits of Johannesburg Children


With a dizzying flurry of oil paints, watercolors, silkscreen & monotype printing techniques, charcoal, and ink, artist Nelson Makamo captures the daily life of South African children as reflected in their charismatic faces. Based in Johannesburg, Makamo prefers to refer to himself as a storyteller or narrator of what he encounters everyday. “I document each day visually because for me each day is a blessing, being able to capture movements and feelings of people who live around me.” His portraits depict hopeful faces filled with laughter and confidence, awash in spirited dashes of color. Via Salon Ninety One:

Key themes informing Makamo’s practice include the city of Johannesburg with its dizzying dynamism, portraiture, the narrative of the artist’s personal history – an unpolitical archive of personal experience, as well as themes of migration, urbanization, identity, masquerade and the transition from childhood to adulthood. Makamo ultimately strives to communicate a universal experience, which viewers can relate to and access through his artwork.

Makamo has exhibited in numerous group and solo shows in South Africa, France, Italy, the U.S., The Netherlands and Scotland over the last few years. You can see more of his artwork at Candice Berman Fine Art or follow him on Instagram. And just in case you were wondering, his shoes. (via Lustik)









See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Neon Sunsets and Technicolor Landscapes Painted by Grant Haffner


Deeply influenced by a childhood spent growing up on Long Beach in Sag Harbor, N.Y., artist Grant Haffner tries to capture the color and feeling of sunsets burnt into his memories. Haffner works primarily with a mixture of acrylic, marker, pencil and paint pen on wood panels to create vibrant neon depictions of Long Island landscapes from the viewpoint of roadways punctuated with power lines. He shares about his paintings:

The East End of Long Island has been my home for most of my life. I spent many years exploring the trails through the woods, cruising the quiet country roads, and hanging out on the beaches. My childhood here, surrounded by nature and water, was an experience that I cherish. Now that I am older, I can see how the landscape is changing and am reminded that it will never be the same. Hopefully, my paintings will capture the memory of that landscape before it fades.

Haffner is represented by Damien A. Roman Fine Art where you can see more of his recent work. (via My Modern Met)








See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Michael Kagan’s Space-Based Paintings Explore the Fatalistic Power of Manmade Machinery

Contact Light, 2014, Oil and linen, 60 x 45 inches

Contact Light, 2014, Oil and linen, 60 x 45 inches

Heavily tinted blue paintings form space stations, spacesuits, and rockets just after blast. Michael Kagan paints these large-scale works to celebrate the man-made object—machinery that both protects and holds the possibility of instantly killing those that operate the equipment from the inside. To paint the large works, Kagan utilizes an impasto technique with thick strokes that are deliberate and unique, showing an aggression in his application of oil paint on linen.

The New York-based artist focuses on iconic images in his practice, switching back and forth between abstract and representational styles. “The painting is finished when it can fall apart and come back together depending on how it is read and the closeness to the work,” said Kagan about his work. “Each painting is an image, a snapshot, a flash moment, a quick read that is locked into memory by the iconic silhouettes.”

Kagan exhibited this series of space-based paintings last year at Joshua Liner Gallery in an exhibition titled Thunder in the Distance. He was also recently commissioned by The Smithsonian to create three large paintings inspired by their air and space archives. You can see more of his work on his Instagram here. (via Fubiz)

One Day This Will All Be Yours, 2014, Oil and linen, 60 x 80 inches

One Day This Will All Be Yours, 2014, Oil and linen, 60 x 80 inches

Reflector, 2014, Oil and linen, 36 x 36 inches

Reflector, 2014, Oil and linen, 36 x 36 inches

We Live On In The Thoughts Of Others, 2014, Oil and linen, 36 x 36 inches

We Live On In The Thoughts Of Others, 2014, Oil and linen, 36 x 36 inches

Apollo, 2010, Oil and linen, 60 x 34 inches

Apollo, 2010, Oil and linen, 60 x 34 inches

Supersonic, 2014, Oil and linen, 72 x 54 inches

Supersonic, 2014, Oil and linen, 72 x 54 inches

Mankind, 2014, Oil and linen, 96 x 54 inches

Mankind, 2014, Oil and linen, 96 x 54 inches

With All The F*cking Force, 2011, Oil and linen, 60 x 80 inches

With All The Fucking Force, 2011, Oil and linen, 60 x 80 inches

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Peek Inside the Galleries and a Playlist of Short Films Showing at Banksy’s Dismaland

Dietrich Wegner / Photo by Christopher Jobson for Colossal

The fun thing about Dismaland is that in addition to pieces by Banksy, you get to immerse yourself in the works of 58 additional artists, and films by 22 directors and animators. It’s impossible to grasp the scope of every last sculpture, painting, and installation, but included here is a small selection of pieces the crowds are buzzing about inside the three large indoor gallery spaces at Dismaland. You can see our additional coverage of the event here, and Evan over at Juxtapoz managed to get an exclusive interview with Banksy before the event.

Lastly, here are links to the 24 short films included in the hour-long Cinema program I helped with.

F*ck That: A Guided Meditation by Jason Headley; Bottle by Kristen Lepore; New York Park by Black Sheep Films; Symmetry by the Mercadantes; Magic Hats by Jake Sumner; Golden Age of Insect Aviation: The Great Grasshoppers by Wayne Unten; Walking on By by Mr. Freeman; Merry-go-round by Vladimír Turner; The Gap by Daniel Sax; 5 mètres 80 by Nicolas Deveaux; I’ve fallen, and I can’t get up! by Dave Fothergill [with audio added]; Danielle by Anthony Cerniello; Anamorphose Temporelle by Adrien M. & Claire B.; Stainless / Shinjuku (excerpt) by Adam Magyar; Collapsing Cooling Towers by Ecotricity; Liberty by Vincent Ullmann [edited with audio added]; The Employment by opusBou; Yawns by the Mercadantes; Rush Hour by Black Sheep Films; Pug Particles by Ramil Valiev; Shell’s priceless Grand Prix moment by Greenpeace Living With Jigsaw by Chris Capell; Teddy Has An Operation by Ze Frank; and Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared #1 by Becky and Joe.

Janus, 2015 (Courtesy of Maskull Lasserre)

Damien Hirst

Jimmy Cauty’s ADP installation / Photograph by Christopher Jobson for Colossal / Click for detail

Embroidered cars by Severija Inčirauskaite-Kriaunevičiene / Photo by Christopher Jobson for Colossal

Anatomical ceramics by Ronit Baranga

Tattooed Porcelain Figures by Jessica Harrison / Top photo by Christopher Jobson for Colossal

Paco Pomet / Photo by Christopher Jobson for Colossal

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Page 1 of 291234...»