Tag Archives: painting

Full Trailer for ‘Loving Vincent,’ a Feature-Length Film Animated by 62,450 Oil Paintings 

The full trailer for Loving Vincent (previously here and here), a film examining the life of Vincent van Gogh, has finally been released after nearly six years of creative development. Each of the 62,450 frames for the feature-length film were hand-painted by 115 professional oil painters, and will integrate 94 of Van Gogh’s paintings into the animation. First captured as a live action film, the final oil paintings replicate each shot, recreating the entire film frame-by-frame. Loving Vincent is written and directed by Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman, and produced by Poland’s BreakThru Films and UK’s Trademark Films. You look behind-the-scenes of the film in the video below, as well as keep up-to-date with release information on the film’s Twitter and Facebook.

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Speculative Paintings of a Graffiti-Covered Earth by Josh Keyes 

"Descent" (2016), acrylic on panel, 8"x10"

“Descent” (2016), acrylic on panel, 8″x10″

Josh Keyes' newest series features subjects both manmade and natural, their common element being several layers of graffiti that cover a space shuttle, a melting iceberg, and even a whale’s tail. For the last ten years these marks had remained in the background of Keyes’ paintings, adding detail to the supporting elements of the environment rather than being integrated into the subjects of his work.

For Keyes, the decision to place graffiti writing in the foreground questions our relationship to the natural world, and what impact we are undeniably leaving on our planet. The iceberg for instance, is marked with the words, “I’ll melt with you.” This blood red message could be the voice of both the iceberg and the tagger, a warning that we will all be melting if we continue to desecrate the Earth.

“Are there things and places that graffiti should not be?” asked Keyes to Colossal. “Who is to say what surface is to be kept graffiti clean? My personal concern is that this will be a reality some day and speaks to a larger issue of our relationship with the natural world. The satellite and space graffiti hints that even if we colonize other worlds, what mark will we leave? No matter where we go there is evidence of our presence.”

Keyes’ will exhibit his paintings later this year with Thinkspace Gallery in LA. You can see more of his works on his Instagram and website.

"Tin Can" (2016), acrylic on panel, 24"x48", all images via Josh Keyes

“Tin Can” (2016), acrylic on panel, 24″x48″, all images via Josh Keyes

"Tin Can" (2016), acrylic on panel, 24"x48"

“Tin Can” (2016), acrylic on panel, 24″x48″

"I'll Melt With You" (2016), acrylic on panel, 12"x18"

“I’ll Melt With You” (2016), acrylic on panel, 12″x18″

"Frontier 2" (2016), acrylic on panel, 12"x16"

“Frontier 2″ (2016), acrylic on panel, 12″x16”

"Frontier" (2015), acrylic on panel, 19"x24"

“Frontier” (2015), acrylic on panel, 19″x24″

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Cubism and Realism Collide in New Murals and Paintings by ‘Belin’ 

Spanish artist Miguel Ángel Belinchón Bujes, or Belin, has long been known in the graffiti world for his photorealistic murals. After a recent trip to Pablo Picasso’s birthplace however, his work has begun to adopt elements of cubism—now producing creative portraits in a style he’s dubbed postneocubismo. His works are often based on loved ones, breaking up elements of their faces in order to recompose eyes, ears, and mouths into distorted configurations.

Although many of his newer works have moved to canvas, he is still very much involved with making work in the public realm, like the above mural he created for last year’s Meeting of Styles’ festival in Cancun, Mexico. You can see more of Belin’s work on his website and Instagram. (via Arrested Motion)

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Hyperrealistic Oil Paintings of Vivid Chrome Masks by Kip Omolade 

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash I, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Brooklyn-based artist Kip Omolade creates large-scale oil paintings of chrome masks, depicting not only the subtle details of female faces, but incorporating the reflected environment of each piece. The series, entitled Diovadiova Chrome, makes reference in part to historical African sculptures, while exploring contemporary aspects of identity, luxury, and immortality. Each piece begins as a mold and cast taken from an actual model which is then utilized as source material for Omolade’s towering paintings which can measure several feet tall.

Diovadiova Chrome portraits historically connect to ancient, realistic African sculptures such as Benin ivory masks and Ife bronze heads,” shares Omolade in his artist statement. “The oil paintings are psychological studies that investigate immortality, the universal masks we all wear and contemporary notions of beauty and luxury. The labor-intensive process involves making a mold and cast of each model’s face, reworking the cast plaster sculpture, producing a version in resin and adding a chrome layer with artificial eyelashes. The final sculpture then serves as a model for the hyper-realistic oil painting. This technique maintains the likeness qualities of portraiture while re-presenting a mask that serves as a conduit between the spiritual and natural world.”

The term Omolade uses to describe the series, Diovadiova, is a word he derived from a combination of the Italian word “Dio” meaning god, and the historical meaning of the word “diva” which is goddess.

Omolade first began his art career working as a graffiti artist while interning at Marvel Comics and The Center for African Art and went on to earn a BFA from the School of Visual Arts. His work was most recently included in the Re:Semblance exhibition at the Redbull House of Art in Detroit and last year’s FREAK OUT! show at Zhou B Art Center. You can follow more of his work on Instagram. (via Creator’s Project)

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn IV, Oil on canvas, 24 x 36 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn I, Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash IV, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash II, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn V, Oil on canvas, 12 x 16 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn III, Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Joyce II, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

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Radiant Sunsets and Landscapes Hidden Inside Forgotten Places by Andrew McIntosh 

Scottish painter Andrew McIntosh (aka Mackie) takes ubiquitous structures often abandoned on rural homesteads like travel campers or sheds and reveals hidden worlds within: radiant sunsets and expansive skies that appear like portals into another place. Drawing inspiration from a childhood spent in the Highlands of Scotland, the London-based painter gives unexpected life to derelict buildings set against the backdrop of mist-filled woods and frozen mountains. From his artist statement:

My paintings are an exercise in attraction. Through them I am constantly searching for new ways of communicating with the viewer. By seducing them with my imagery, I try to create a new visual language with the power to pique their attention and make them stop to ask: why? Desolate landscapes, decrepit houses, and incongruous moments of glory come together to suggest the presence of a narrative that exists as much in the viewer’s mind as in the painting. This is how I aim to use my works: as the space for an imaginary dialogue between strangers.

McIntosh most recently exhibited a new body of work with bo.lee gallery last month titled “Where we Belong” at Pulse Miami. You can see many more recent paintings in his online portfolio. (via The Jealous Curator)

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Enormous Palette Knife Portraits and Figures by Salman Khoshroo 

Working with a large palette knife and thick globs of oil paint, Tehran-based artist Salman Khoshroo creates large-scale figures and portraits that practically drip from the canvas. The scale on a computer or mobile screen can be quite deceiving, as most of these pieces are several feet tall, composed of enormously precise strokes that veer toward abstraction while eventually leading to a cohesive figure. Most of the paintings seen here were created for a 2015 show at Azad Gallery and an exhibition earlier this year at Shirin Gallery. You can follow Khoshroo’s work on Facebook and Instagram.

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