Tag Archives: painting

New Surreal Wildlife Paintings by Tiffany Bozic 

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Self-taught artist Tiffany Bozic (previously) paints nature in a way that is both direct and obscure, producing animals with the precision of a tightly rendered nature illustration, while simultaneously escaping the form’s limitations. Her subject matter typically revolves around forest creatures and their environment, while occasionally including creatures and plants such as amoeba-like jellyfish, creepy insects, and exotic flowers. These diverse sects of the natural world combine in ways that are not natural at all—a deer’s soft hair appearing as moss in one work while a skunk gallantly balances on top of a hovering botanical bouquet in another.

Bozic is represented by Joshua Liner Gallery in NYC where she has an upcoming solo exhibition next fall. You can see more of her work on her Instagram and buy select prints from her website.

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A Collaborative Duo Pokes Fun at Plein Air Painting Through Photographic Series 

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Duo Hank Schmidt in der Beek and Fabian Schubert have been poking fun at plein air painting with a collaborative project since 2009, a humorous series of photographs shot by Schubert that captures in der Beek with his original paintings. Und im Sommer tu ich malen (which translates roughly to “And in the Summer I do Paint”) follows in der Beek to various locations in Europe where painters such as Paul Cezanne, Claude Monet, and Vincent Van Gogh have been inspired, but instead of painting the breathtaking views, he paints the pattern of his shirt instead. Looking out onto majestic views, in der Beek proudly stands with paintbrush in hand, vintage looking striped patterns appearing on both his body and the canvas.

The works have appeared in several solo and group exhibitions since the project began, however they are all together for the first time in a book recently published by Edition Taube. (via It’s Nice That)

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Intricate Mandalas Gilded with Gold by Artist Asmahan A. Mosleh 

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All images courtesy of @murderandrose

UK-based artist Asmahan A. Mosleh spends 8 to 54 hours on a single mandala, publishing photos of her intricate works on her Instagram, @murderandrose. The pieces, often gilded with gold paint, begin with a pencil outline which she then traces in pen, and finally pigment. Pearls of paint are added as final details that give the circular paintings a bit of texture, adding bright pops to the already dense designs. Mosleh also works straight from inception to completion, absorbing herself in the pattern of one artwork before deciding which to begin next.

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Bright Environmental Paintings Focused on Survival by Artist Julie Heffernan 

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Artist Julie Heffernan's paintings are technically complicated, layers of detail filling her often 5-foot-tall canvases. Although enchanting, her environments reference disaster and distress, situations that peek into how we might reposition ourselves in nature after massive traumas such as Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill.

“We are slowly making our world unlivable, and I want to bring to the surface the destructive action, waster, and contamination that is generally invisible to us,” says Heffernan in her artist statement. “I need to imagine another way, to outfit myself with signs and banners that speak louder than I can, to envision how we might remake the world as it is slowly falling apart.”

Another far lighter inspiration Heffernan works with in her paintings is the childhood game of Chutes and Ladders. Like the climbing, twisting, and meandering board game, her paintings allow the eye to crawl up, down, and around the forests and mountains she paints. You can see more of these ambitious landscape works on her portfolio site, and read her own thoughts on painting on her blog, Painters on Paintings. (via Booooooom)

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Artists Turn Their Palettes into Paintings for the Exhibition “Point of Origin” 

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Denis Sarazhin

After completing a series of miniature paintings two years ago, Dina Brodsky (previously) turned to her palette, experimenting with the tool of the series’ creation until it became a work of its own. During a studio visit with a friend she noticed he too had created a work on an old palette, however the work was far different than her own. This discovery led Brodsky to investigate other artists’ palettes and how they might manipulate them into works, inviting both friends and strangers to experiment with their palettes.

“Everyone I asked made a phenomenal painting, and because they were sharing the images on social media, a few other artists asked if they could participate,” said Brodsky to Colossal. “It grew from there, almost like a conversation that was happening via palette paintings and social media amongst artists all over the globe.”

The rapid expansion of palettes has even led to an antique 19th century palette from Spain, which Brodsky believes to be a sketch from Luis Pidal Menendez, a 19th century painter from Barcelona. This historic painting, as well as 51 other works from Brodsky’s friends and larger artist community, will be on display at The Lodge Gallery in New York City in an exhibition titled Point of Origin from October 13 to November 13, 2016. The exhibition is curated by Brodsky and curator Trek Lexington.

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James Adelman

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Alonsa Guevara

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Dina Brodsky in progress

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Christian Fagerlund

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Joshua Henderson

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Amber Lia-Kloppel

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Tim Lowly

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Artist Leon Tarasewicz Covers the Poland National Gallery’s Great Hall Staircase in Splatter Paint 

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The Great Hall during the exhibition “Polish Painting of the 21st Century,” Leon Tarasewicz, 2006, photo: Sebastian Madejski. All images via We Are Museums

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Back in 2006, Warsaw’s National Gallery of Art, Zachęta, held a group exhibition titled “Polish Painting of the 21st Century.” Painter Leon Tarasewicz contributed a site-specific work to the 60-artist exhibition, redoing the museum’s Great Hall in a bath of red, yellow, blue, and green splatter paint. The work splattered the stairs and crept up the surrounding walls, creating a dramatic entrance for anyone entering the exhibition. (via ArchAtlas which was inexplicably deleted by Tumblr last week?)

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