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Art

Sledgehammers and High Heels Find a Modern Pairing in Kelly Reemtsen’s New Paintings

November 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Painter Kelly Reemtsen (previously) paints images of anonymous women in thick impasto. The pieces juxtapose high fashion with tools and other construction equipment, placing sequenced high heels alongside sledgehammers and hefty axes. The colorfully painted works are Reemtsen’s comment on modern femininity. By placing tools in each of her subjects’ hands, the LA-based artist showcases that having feminine identification doesn’t mean fitting into a predetermined role.

Reemtsen is represented by Detroit-based David Klein Gallery and Lyndsey Ingram in London. You can view more of her fashionably dressed subjects on her website.

 

 



Art

Landscapes and Geometric Shapes Intersect in New Paintings by Mary Iverson

November 8, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Windmills, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Using a combination of oil and acrylic paint, ink, and found photographs, Seattle-based artist Mary Iverson (previously) investigates the relationship between humans and their environment in her landscape overlay paintings. Iverson builds worlds where dramatically angled, brightly colored geometric shapes are caught in webs of competing perspective lines and grids, superimposed over otherwise tranquil scenery.

Iverson described her work to Amadeus Magazine: “In following my interests and working to resolve an artistic dichotomy within myself, between my love and nature and my fascination with the shipping industry, I came upon a visual solution that metaphorically echoes what we are facing in the world today.”

These paintings are included in Correspondence, her exhibition with Scott Albrecht at Andenken Gallery in Amsterdam, NL. The show opens on November 11. You can also see more of Iverson’s finished and in-progress works on Instagram.

Fort Bourtange, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Amsterdam, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Summer Triangle, Crater Lake National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas 2017

Shipwreck, Yosemite National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas, 2017

Shipwreck, Mount Rainier National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas 2017

 

 



Art History

Watch as a 17th Century Portrait Emerges From 200 Years of Discolored Varnish

November 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Art historian, dealer, and BBC television host Philip Mould recently posted a video to his Twitter that reveals a gleaming 17th century painting hiding underneath two centuries of yellowed varnish. The protective finish is applied to protect paintings from wear, but over time will begin to discolor. In the short video Mould gently paints a solvent to remove this layer from the work’s surface, slowly brushing it away in circular strokes.

The only details known about the mysterious lady in red is from an inscription on the painting that notes she was 36 when the work was completed in 1618. You can watch Mould remove the last bits of varnish from the subject’s face in the short clip below, and follow more of his painting adventures on Twitter. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 



Art

New Painted Mandalas Gilded with Gold Leaf by Artist Asmahan Rose Mosleh

November 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Yemeni artist Asmahan A. Mosleh (previously) continues to paint stunning acrylic mandala works infused with gold leaf accents. The meditative pieces take days to complete with upward of 80 hours spent on an individual painting. The UK-based artist shares process videos and completed works on her Instagram.

 

 



Art Illustration

Ethereal Acrylic Paintings by Duy Huynh Explore Cultural Displacement and Elements of Folklore

November 2, 2017

Christopher Jobson

North Carolina-based painter Duy Huynh (previously) infuses his acrylic paintings with whimsical elements of visual storytelling, where a plume of instruments rises from a rushing locomotive and the moon hovers as a balloon tethered to the wrist of a woman. Huynh arrived in the U.S. from Vietnam in the 1980s and often revisits this period of cultural acclimatization in his artwork. Via his artist statement:

Themes of geographical and cultural displacement are prevalent in Duy’s artwork. Ethereal characters maintain a serene, precarious balance, often in a surreal or dreamlike setting. With his figures, Duy explores motion along with emotion in order to portray not just the beauty of the human form, but also the triumph of the human spirit.

Huynh is the co-owner of Lark & Key Gallery and many of his original works and prints are currently available.

 

 



Art

Three-Dimensional Portraits of Suspended Paint Strokes by Chris Dorosz

October 24, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Rather than considering paint as a liquid medium, San Francisco-based artist Chris Dorosz uses the traditional material as a unit of measure to form anonymous sculptural portraits. At first glance, the three-dimensional paintings read as abstract compilations of shapes, and only once the viewer looks head-on at the portrait does a human figure begin to emerge.

As he writes in his artist statement, Dorosz considers the paint drop to be “a form that takes shape not from a brush or any human-made implement or gesture, but purely from its own viscosity and the air it falls through, as analogous to the building blocks that make up the human body (DNA) or even its mimetic representation (the pixel).”

Dorosz is represented by Scott Richards Contemporary Art. The suite of four busts, entitled Rosh, is on view November 18, 2017 at the Muriel Guépin Gallery in New York.

 

 



Art

Vibrant Sunsets Hover Inside Abandoned Scottish Castles and Homes by Andrew McIntosh

October 17, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Scottish painter Andrew McIntosh (previously) paints bridges, castles, and forgotten homes, repurposing the structures’ windows and arches as vibrant portals into another world. The deep red and orange sunsets found in these negative spaces serve as the heart of each work, which each cast an intense glow into the surrounding desolate landscapes. The works are centered around scenes found in his native Scotland, areas that don’t necessarily elicit awe or intrigue from the average viewer.

“McIntosh is drawn to the plain and ordinary – a Victorian lodge, a simple tower house, or an unremarkable castle set in scenery that is not immediately picturesque or inspiring – subjects that wouldn’t usually attract an artist’s attention,” writes Dr. Richard Davey in an essay about McIntosh’s paintings. “They are born from deep knowledge of the land, painted by an artist who wants to probe the limits of landscape painting, who knows that nature is much quieter than it is more usually portrayed, and that capturing the undramatic, ordinariness of nature, is more difficult than it may seem.”

The confined sunsets serve as secretive elements of power to each crumbling form of architecture. McIntosh intends for these private moments to remind the viewer of everyday wonder, and to search for these moments during the mundane aspects of the day-to-day. The painter has an upcoming solo exhibition of his work at Beaux Arts London opening October 19 and running through November 18, 2017.