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Art Illustration

Pat Perry’s Intricate Portraits of People Intertwined with the Natural World

February 21, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Detroit-based artist Pat Perry (previously) renders intricate, fantastical portraits of humans and our relationship to the natural world—a dynamic that is sometimes harmonious, sometimes adversarial.  His multi-media drawings and paintings range from monochrome sketches handheld notebooks to multicolored murals on building walls. In all of his artwork, Perry balances finely worked details with sweeping gestural lines. The artist described his art in an interview with Communication Arts: “I want to make paintings that just softly whisper to you the thing that you forgot.” You can explore more of Perry’s illustrations, including a body of work based on a residency in Katmai National Park, on his website as well as on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Art

Dina Brodsky Chronicles Her Travels in Detailed Miniature Landscape Paintings

February 9, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Painter Dina Brodsky (previously) records travel memories from long distance bicycling trips in small circular oil paintings. Brodsky’s style channels the heightened realism of 19th century landscape painters; whereas the historical paintings were created on enormous canvases that echoed the vast American landscape, Brodsky’s contemporary take condenses the visual impact into a token-sized work that fits in the palm of a hand. The artist describes the intention and scale of her work:

I like to think that the reason my works have gotten so tiny over the years is that painting itself is partially an act of meditation, of being able to hold something still enough in my mind that I can capture an image of it. As it becomes easier to slip into that meditative state, the object I need to concentrate on becomes smaller.

Paintings from this series are on view until March 4th in the show Cycling Guide to Lilliput at Pontone Gallery in London. Brodsky also shares her work on Instagram, and offers prints of select paintings in her Etsy shop. (via Create! Magazine)

 

 



Art

A Series of Ordinary Humans and Creatures Trapped Within Their Pop Culture Depictions

February 7, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Netherlands-based artist Super A (previously here and here) has a new series of painting and sculpture that explores the truth behind fantasy, slicing through pop culture figures to examine the reality that lays at their core. Trapped features characters such as Tweety, Mickey Mouse, Snow White and even Ronald McDonald as their recognizable features unfurl like ribbons, revealing realistically formed birds, mice, and people caught inside.

The series intends to address our skewed perception of reality through easily digestible cartoons, demonstrating that there can be no objectivity when it comes to our daily view of the world. A certain lens is always employed, a myth disguises the harsh truths.

“Nowadays the most dominant myths we have embraced as an warm blanket of truth are liberty, property and individualism,” said Super A. “We tend to see these as absolute objective truths which suit the best interests of all humanity. But aren’t we just trapped within our cozy reality? And if it’s cozy… Should we even dare to break free?”

Super A has shown works from the series in a variety of exhibitions. The Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck paintings were recently shown at Vertical Gallery's group exhibition Portrait, Tweety is on view at Pow! Wow! Exploring the New Contemporary Art Movement curated by Thinkspace Gallery at the Honolulu Museum of Art, and Snow White and Pierrot will be shown at an upcoming exhibition with Galerie Droste.

“Pierrot,” 2018. 65 cm x 60 cm x 30 cm. Polyester, epoxy, resin, enamel paint.

 

 



Art Design

Color Palettes of Historic Paintings Subdivided with Algorithms by Dimitris Ladopoulos

January 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Athens-based motion graphics and visual designer Dimitris Ladopoulos uses a series of algorithms to subdivide his favorite works of art, breaking down the color compositions of centuries old paintings in the 3D animation software Houdini. With this process, Ladopoulos digitally observes the palette of Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn‘s Portrait of Johannes Wtenbogaert, in addition to examining the thousands of specific shades used to compose Rembrandt Peale‘s portrait of his daughter Rosalba.

The two digital compositions provide a contemporary view of historical paintings, showcasing how each might be analyzed as a designed object rather than a painted work. You can see more of Ladopoulos’s projects, like this earlier experiment with algorithm-based geometric patterns, on the designer’s website and Behance.

 

 



Art Illustration

Paul Saari’s Mysterious Dreamworlds Set in Melancholy Landscapes

January 24, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Canadian oil painter Paul Saari imagines mesmerizing worlds, which he renders in pastel tones. In some works, the softness of his painting style and the candy-like colors add to the mystical, dreamlike quality of the feathery forests and twinkling skies. In others, the soft colors and brushstrokes are jarred by ominous swirling weather patterns and dark, melancholy shadows. Saari shares his work on Instagram. If you like Saari’s work, also check out Julie Heffernan. (via CrossConnect Magazine)

 

 



Art

Walk Inside a Warehouse-Sized Kaleidoscopic Painting by Katharina Grosse

January 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest work by German artist Katharina Grosse encompasses an entire warehouse, transforming its raw interior into a soft maze of kaleidoscopic color. The installation, titled The Horse Trotted Another Couple of Metres, Then it Stopped, responds to the architecture of Sydney’s contemporary art center Carriageworks, filling the industrial space with nearly 90,000 square feet of painted fabric.

“I was fascinated by the thought of folding space,” explained Grosse in a statement about the work. “I was interested in taking this vast surface and shrinking it by folding or, actually, hiding the entirety of what’s there. I understand a painting as something that, as we view it, travels through us and realigns our connections with the world.”

To produce the piece Grosse first suspended the multitude of fabric from Carriageworks’ ceiling, creating a series of drapes and folds. The artist then used a spray gun to paint the work in a series of gestural strokes, creating an immersive site-specific environment that obscures the historic building’s architecture in a dense mass of swirling color.

The work was mounted as a part of Sydney Festival 2018, and is on view through April 8, 2018. You can view more of Grosse’s large-scale paintings (including this 2016 in situ installation at Rockaway Beach) on her website.  (via Juxtapoz)

 

 



Art Illustration

Miniature Paintings on Tea Bags by Ruby Silvious

January 18, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Some of us may give our used tea bags a second life by squeezing an extra steep out of them, but Ruby Silvious takes things a step further by using the thin paper as a canvas for miniature paintings. Silvious mirrors the simple ritual of tea drinking in quiet paintings that show slices of everyday life, like laundry drying and cats looking out the window.

The artist began her initial year-long series of paintings in January 2015. Since then, Silvious has compiled that year into a book, and traveled to Japan and southern France for month-long sessions of tea drinking and painting. Her work is included in a group show “Deemed a Canvas” at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia, which opens on January 26th. You can see more of Silvious’ work on her website and Instagram.

 

 

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