Tag Archives: painting

Timelapse of Lorraine Loots Creating a Miniature Painting 


Over the last few months we’ve marveled at the precision of South African artist Lorraine Loots' tiny paintings (previously here and here). In this new process video shot by Gareth Pon, we finally get to see how she blends pencil and paint to execute the most minute details of a wee hotdog no larger than a coin. Loots is exhibiting no less than 730 of her ‘Paintings for Ants’ at Three Kings Studio in New York starting July 8, 2015.

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Jim Darling’s Airplane Window Seat Paintings Frame Landscapes From Mile-High Perspectives 


Often I use the windows of airplanes as frames in which to view the landscapes just beyond the thick glass— scenes featuring rolling clouds, rich gradient skies, and patchwork fields. Jim Darling has taken this idea of the window as frame and created paintings that place the audience as passenger, showcasing vague yet nostalgic landscapes within his constructed airplane windows.

Darling’s paintings are from this sky-high perspective, painted cities, clouds, and oceans with the occasional wing creeping into the painting from the far edges. Each work includes layered woodwork, acrylic, and aerosol to build the tromp l’oeil nature of the piece, allowing one to finally experience these atmospheric views without the turbulence. (via Stop, Drop & Vogue)










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A Technicolor Swimming Pool Painted by HOTTEA on New York’s Roosevelt Island 


In a departure from his large-scale color field yarn installations, Minnesota-based artist HOT TEA is back in New York and was given the opportunity to transform a swimming pool on Roosevelt Island with whatever colors he saw fit. Apparently he took the ambitious approach and decided to use them all, spread between 120 gallons of paint.

The private commission produced by K&CO and Pliskin Architecture is called Asylum, a title the artist chose “because the act of creating it pushed my mental and physical endurance so far that I wasn’t sure I could complete the task,” he shares with Brooklyn Street Art. For almost a century starting in 1839, the island was also home to the New York City Lunatic Asylum. The vibrantly luminous gradients that define the area around the pool contrast starkly when viewed against the rest of the surrounding landscape, creating a surprising oasis of color.

The pool, located in Manhattan Park, opens for swimming Memorial Day weekend. You can read a bit more about it on Brooklyn Street Art.






Photo by Jamie Rojo for Brooklyn Street Art

Photo by Jamie Rojo for Brooklyn Street Art


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New Historical Portraits on Flattened Cans by Kim Alsbrooks 


Kim Alsbrooks (previously) began painting historical portraits on crushed cans in 2004 while living in the South. The series “My White Trash Family” was born out of the frustration of prevailing ideologies of class distinction, ideas she decided to challenge by placing portraits of the past onto everyman’s consumerist leftovers. These paintings are typically depicted straight from 17th to 18th centuries, and tend to match the material environment they are placed upon (either through color choice, content, or both).

For each painting a gesso layer is applied first, followed by a drawn image in graphite, and finally oil paint and varnish. Alsbrooks only uses detritus she finds on the streets, faithfully sticking to cans that have already been trampled and crushed flat. Difficulty comes in finding the perfect cans, as they must be free of wrinkles that would impede upon on the paintings she places within the center of each surface.

Alsbrooks estimates that she has painted more than 700 of these portraits over the last 11 years, and the series will culminate with an exhibition at the Racine Art Museum in September of this year alongside jewelry maker Nikki Coupee. Alsbrooks often elaborates on the background of the portraits she paints, descriptions behind the portraits’ selection can be found on her blog here.

J.Davis (2)






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Photographic Portraits of Famous Artist’s Paint Palettes by Matthias Schaller 

Palette of Marc Chagall

Since 2007 photographer Matthias Schaller has photographed raw, abstract paintings. The paintings however are not found on canvas, but rather smeared onto the tools used to craft each work of art—the palettes. His series, Das Meisterstück (The Masterpiece), claims these behind-the-scene objects as portraits of the artist, while also giving a direct insight into the detailed techniques performed by each painter.

Schaller was first inspired to begin his photographic collection during a visit to Cy Twombly’s late studio. During the visit he stumbled upon the artist’s palette, which he discovered to be an accurate reflection of the artist’s paintings. Encouraged to further discover the similarities between palette and painting, Schaller has gone on to photograph over two hundred of these historic portraits. His search has led him to collect palettes from all across Europe and the United States, finding the objects in major museums and private foundations and in the custody of artists’ relatives and collectors. The palettes he’s photographed so far in the series belong to seventy painters from both the 19th and 20th century, and include such artists as Monet, van Gogh, Matisse, and Picasso. To accurately analyze the details from paint hue to brushstroke, Schaller presents the images in large format, each work existing at approximately 190 x 150 cm.

Schaller’s practice focuses on non traditional portraits, which he considers “indirect portraits.” Other subject matter has included children’s rooms in Naples, Italy, 150 Italian opera houses, astronaut suits, and early punk vinyls. Through June 8, the Giorgio Cini Foundation will present Schaller’s Das Meisterstück alongside the Venice Biennale, an exhibition that will focus on 20 of Schaller’s palette photographs. (via Hyperallergic)

Palette of Paula Modersohn-Becker / Palette of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Palette of Wassily Kandinsky, 2007, 190x156cm, Copyright: Matthias Schaller,Lenbachhaus, München;

Palette of Claude Monet / Palette of Édouard Manet

Palette of Edgar Degas

Palette of Eugene Delacroix / Palette of Georges Seurat

Turner - Royal 004
Palette of J.M.W. Turner, 2013, 190x156cm, Copyright: Matthias Schaller, The Royal Academy of Arts, London;

Niemeyer 302
Palette of Francis Bacon, 2007, 190x156cm, Copyright: Matthias Schaller, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Dublin.

Niemeyer 451
Palette of Cy Twombly, 2007, 190x156cm, Copyright: Matthias Schaller, Collezione Nicola del Roscio, Gaeta;

Palette of Pablo Picasso / Palette of Henri Matisse

Palette of Vincent van Gogh, 2007, 190x156cm, Copyright: Matthias Schaller, Musée d’Orsay, Paris;

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Explosive Splattered Ink Animal Paintings by Hua Tunan 

Photo by Matt Wells

The creatures depicted in Chinese artist Hua Tunan‘s ink paintings seem moments away from escaping the canvas. Each piece seems to pulse with energy, driven by Tunan’s frenetic painting style that borrows from traditional Chinese ink art and Western-style graffiti. The artist also works on much larger canvases with broad strokes of dripping spray paint on urban murals that have popped up around the world over the last few years.

Tunan currently has an exhibition at Galerie F in Chicago titled Earth Spirit through June 6th, and is completing a number of murals around the city. You can see more of his work by following on Tumblr and Instagram.

Photo by Matt Wells

Photo by Matt Wells

Photo by Matt Wells

Photo by Matt Wells





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Hyper-realistic Cactus Paintings that Bristle with Detail by Kwang-Ho Lee 

Cactus No.69, 2011, Oil on canvas, 162.1×130.3cm, courtesy Johyun Gallery.

With deftly applied strokes of paint scarely wider than a hair, Korean painter Kwang-Ho Lee creates towering renderings of cacti that bristle with thorns and tangled branches. The colorful oil paintings can reach up to 8 feet tall, an imposing scale with ample room for tediously composed details that push each work into the realm of hyperrealism. You can explore more of Lee’s work at Johyun Gallery, Artsy, and Atelier Aki. (via Juxtapoz, Hi-Fructose, Beautiful/Decay)

Cactus No.51,2010,Oil on Canvas,194x200cm, courtesy Johyun Gallery


Cactus No.59, oil on canvas, 259.1x170cm, 2011, courtesy Johyun Gallery

Cactus No.73, oil on canvas 193.9×130.3cm 2011, courtesy Atelier Aki

Cactus No.59, oil on canvas, 259.1x170cm, 2011, courtesy Johyun Gallery

Cactus No.35, oil on canvas 162x130cm 2009, courtesy Atelier Aki

Cactus No.35, detail

“Touch” Exhibition at Joyhun Gallery, 2011

“Touch” Exhibition at Joyhun Gallery, 2011

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