painting

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Art Photography

New Mixed Media Landscapes and Still Lifes That Merge Photography and Impressionism by Stev’nn Hall

March 23, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Stev’nn Hall (previously) blends photography and painting together in an impressionistic style, often focusing his works on the rural landscapes of his Canadian home, or images of flowers he takes in his studio. The pieces are built from images shot with a 35mm camera, and feature gestures on the surface in the mediums of acrylic, ink, and pastel. These markings serve as both complements to the landscapes and abstract bits of scrawl, simultaneously pushing the underlying photograph to appear more like a painting, and Hall’s painted additions to seem like photographic errors. You can see more of his mixed media works on Tumblr and Instagram.

Image by Alejandro Collados Nunez

 

 



Art

Abstracted Alterations to The New York Times’ Front Pages by Fred Tomaselli

March 14, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

“Sunday, October 4, 2009” (2016) Acrylic and ink on paper. 72 1/4 x 43 in. (183.5 x 109.2 cm) Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

Since 2005, artist Fred Tomaselli has been altering the front page of The New York Times, highlighting the day’s catastrophes and nightmares with layered collages and detailed paintings. The series, simply titled The Times, focuses on the tactility of newsprint in a hyper-digital society, as well as the absurdity our contemporary political climate.

The displayed works are large-scale reproductions of the paper’s front page, each titled based on the date of which the original newspaper was published. Tomaselli views these artistic interventions as abstract editorials, just another decision made in the production of the news and its byproducts.

Tomaselli’s works will be featured in the solo exhibition Paper at White Cube gallery in London opening March 17. The exhibition will continue through May 13, 2017. (via Creative Boom)

“Wednesday, July 23, 2014” (2016), acrylic and photo collage over archival inkjet print, 43 x 47 1/2 in. (109.2 x 120.7 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Wednesday, March 4, 2015” (2016), acrylic, photo collage and leaves over archival inkjet print, 50 3/4 x 81 3/4 in. (128.9 x 207.6 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Thursday, May 12, 2011” (2016), acrylic over archival digital print, 43 x 54 in. (109.2 x 137.2 cm), 56 x 67 x 2 in. (142.2 x 170.2 x 5.1 cm) (framed) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014” (2016), acrylic over archival inkjet print, 43 x 59 3/4 in. (109.2 x 151.8 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Thursday, April 2, 2015” (2016), acrylic over archival inkjet print, 72 1/4 x 43 in. (183.5 x 109.2 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Bloom (Dec. 17)” (2017), acrylic and ink on paper, 44 x 65 1/2 in. (111.8 x 166.4 cm), 52 3/4 x 74 1/4 x 2 1/2 in. (134 x 188.6 x 6.4 cm) (framed) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

 

 



Art

Pejac’s Newest Series “Redemption” Utilizes Pressed Wood as Canvas

March 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Spanish street artist Pejac‘s work (previously) is known for its subtle interaction with urban environments, small interruptions to everyday buildings like bird-shaped cracks created in an abandoned power plant’s windows, or trompe l’oeil paintings scattered through the streets of the district of Uskudar.

Pejac’s newest series brings an urban resource into the studio rather than having the artist travel out. Utilizing pressed wood as a pseduo-canvas, Pejac draws with black ink and pencil to produce soft deer, birds, and flowers in the works’ foregrounds. These natural elements showcase the wooden medium’s origin, highlighting how natural environments are continuously being chopped down and constructed over.

“The beauty of the pressed wood seems to hide the arrogance of man in its relation with nature,” said Pejac. “These panels have some sort of aesthetic warmth but at the same time a sense of devastation, making it very contradictory, which directly refers to my way of understanding art. Expressing myself on thousands of small pieces of wood feels like ‘tattooing’ on the stripped skins of trees. Each drawing in this Redemption series are tribute to nature. Any other subject would have been frivolous.”

You can see Pejac’s other series posted on his website. (via Juxtapoz)

 

 



Art

Artist Felice House Reimagines Scenes from Classic Western Films with Female Cowboys as Leads

February 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Julia Dean in “Giant”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 54″ x 68″.

Angered by the gendered division perpetually seen in classic Western films, painter Felice House decided to create her painted series Re-Western. The collection of works are a re-imagining of her favorite Western films cast with female leads instead of the traditional male cowboys, painting females in place of actors such as James Dean, John Wayne, or Clint Eastwood. The women in her paintings are strapped with shotguns riding horses, fiercely looking out onto a deserted plain, and strongly staring into the eyes of the audience clad in plain button-downs and bright red cowboy boots.

“The western movie tradition is so established; so accepted, so mythologized that it spans the globe,” said House to Colossal. “I love the genre, and at the same time when I sit down to watch a Western movie, I start to feel angry. For the most part, the roles in Westerns are totally inaccessible to me.”

Deciding to start a conversation with this frustration, House choose to paint these reimagined Westerns to ask straightforward questions to a society that continuously handed over these roles to males. House seeks to ask what society would be like with this imagined reversal—how would education be changed? What would our reestablished priorities look like with females as the lead role?

Liakesha Dean in “Giant”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 36″ x 48″.

Julia Dean Portrait, 2013. Oil on canvas, 24″x 20″.

“I would argue that in today’s culture portraying women without objectifying them is an intentional and political act,” said House. “The art historical and current cultural norm is to portray women to extol their sexual beauty and to encourage possessiveness. For centuries men have painted images of women for men. Now that women have access to education and training, women are painting women as we see ourselves.”

House uses her female gaze and voice to create strong, female heroes in environments we all know, reestablishing our connection to the well-known historical settings. Working with the idea of a hero, House paints her portraits larger than life. She encourages the viewer to look up and become dwarfed by the women and their power, hoping this change in physical perspective might encourage a change in mental perspective as well.

Several of House’s female portraits are currently in the group exhibition Sight Unseen at Abend Gallery in Denver through March 25. Pieces from her Re-Western series will be included the upcoming exhibition Woman as Warrior at the Zhou B Art Center in Chicago in August. You can see more of her work on her website and Instagram. (via The Creators Project)

Karan and Nanc in Open Range, 2015. Oil on canvas, 36″ x 60″.

Virginia Eastwood in “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 62″ x 80″.

Rebekah Wayne in True Grit (Study), 2014. Oil on canvas, 30″ x 24″.

Krimmie Wayne in “The Searchers”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 60″ x 40″.

Liakesha Cooper in “High Noon”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 36″ x 48″.

Virginia Wayne Portrait, 2013. Oil on canvas, 30″ x 24″.

Stasha Dean in “Giant”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 90″ x 60″.

 

 



Art

Hyperrealistic Paintings of Bulging, Decorative Rugs by Antonio Santin

February 2, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

"corona" (2015), oil on canvas, 59x98.5 inches, all images via Antonio Santin

“corona” (2015), oil on canvas, 59×98.5 inches, all images via Antonio Santin

Antonio Santin produces works that are nearly impossible to identify as paintings, hyperrealistic depictions of decorative rugs covered in complex floral arrangements and patterns. Each piece is composed of thousands of paint strokes that mimic the texture of a rug’s weave, thick segments of oil paint that transform his nearly five-foot long canvases.

Adding another layer of difficulty to the detailed paintings, Santin includes bulges and creases that appear to obscure large masses beneath his 2D surfaces. Previously working with still lifes, Santin told The Creators Project that the rugs were a way for him to get rid of the figure within his works while still holding on to the outline of its shape. He calls his rug series “figurative paintings without a figure,” eerie pieces that give an illusion of a body hidden beneath the surface.

The New York-based artist was born in Madrid, Spain in 1978, and graduated with a degree in Fine Arts from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2005. You can see more of his rug paintings on his website and Instagram. (via The Creators Project)

“alicia” (2014), oil on canvas, 73×110 inches

"flushing meats" (2014), oil on canvas, 56x98 inches

“flushing meats” (2014), oil on canvas, 56×98 inches

"festland" (2014), oil on canvas, 52x97 inches

“festland” (2014), oil on canvas, 52×97 inches

"incest coin" (2015), oil on canvas, 78 inches

“incest coin” (2015), oil on canvas, 78 inches

"dystopian blues" (2014), oil on canvas, 78x90 inches

“dystopian blues” (2014), oil on canvas, 78×90 inches

"Claire" (2014), oil on canvas, 94 1/2 inches

“Claire” (2014), oil on canvas, 94 1/2 inches

"Claire" (detail) (2014), oil on canvas, 94.5 inches

“Claire” (detail) (2014), oil on canvas, 94.5 inches

 

 



Art

Oil Paintings of Eyes and Mouths on Glass by Henrik Uldalen

February 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of this ongoing series, self-taught painter Henrik Uldalen has been creating depictions of eyes and mouths on glass. The oil paintings are an extension of his focus on classic figurative painting where he explores “the dark sides of life, nihilism, existentialism, longing and loneliness, juxtaposed with fragile beauty.” Uldalen regularly shares his progress on Instagram and a few of these works are available in his shop.
(via My Amy Goes to 11, Juxtapoz)

 

 



Animation Art History

Full Trailer for ‘Loving Vincent,’ a Feature-Length Film Animated by 62,450 Oil Paintings

January 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The full trailer for Loving Vincent (previously here and here), a film examining the life of Vincent van Gogh, has finally been released after nearly six years of creative development. Each of the 62,450 frames for the feature-length film were hand-painted by 115 professional oil painters, and will integrate 94 of Van Gogh’s paintings into the animation. First captured as a live action film, the final oil paintings replicate each shot, recreating the entire film frame-by-frame. Loving Vincent is written and directed by Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman, and produced by Poland’s BreakThru Films and UK’s Trademark Films. You look behind-the-scenes of the film in the video below, as well as keep up-to-date with release information on the film’s Twitter and Facebook.