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Art

Artist Felice House Reimagines Scenes from Classic Western Films with Female Cowboys as Leads

February 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Julia Dean in “Giant”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 54″ x 68″.

Angered by the gendered division perpetually seen in classic Western films, painter Felice House decided to create her painted series Re-Western. The collection of works are a re-imagining of her favorite Western films cast with female leads instead of the traditional male cowboys, painting females in place of actors such as James Dean, John Wayne, or Clint Eastwood. The women in her paintings are strapped with shotguns riding horses, fiercely looking out onto a deserted plain, and strongly staring into the eyes of the audience clad in plain button-downs and bright red cowboy boots.

“The western movie tradition is so established; so accepted, so mythologized that it spans the globe,” said House to Colossal. “I love the genre, and at the same time when I sit down to watch a Western movie, I start to feel angry. For the most part, the roles in Westerns are totally inaccessible to me.”

Deciding to start a conversation with this frustration, House choose to paint these reimagined Westerns to ask straightforward questions to a society that continuously handed over these roles to males. House seeks to ask what society would be like with this imagined reversal—how would education be changed? What would our reestablished priorities look like with females as the lead role?

Liakesha Dean in “Giant”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 36″ x 48″.

Julia Dean Portrait, 2013. Oil on canvas, 24″x 20″.

“I would argue that in today’s culture portraying women without objectifying them is an intentional and political act,” said House. “The art historical and current cultural norm is to portray women to extol their sexual beauty and to encourage possessiveness. For centuries men have painted images of women for men. Now that women have access to education and training, women are painting women as we see ourselves.”

House uses her female gaze and voice to create strong, female heroes in environments we all know, reestablishing our connection to the well-known historical settings. Working with the idea of a hero, House paints her portraits larger than life. She encourages the viewer to look up and become dwarfed by the women and their power, hoping this change in physical perspective might encourage a change in mental perspective as well.

Several of House’s female portraits are currently in the group exhibition Sight Unseen at Abend Gallery in Denver through March 25. Pieces from her Re-Western series will be included the upcoming exhibition Woman as Warrior at the Zhou B Art Center in Chicago in August. You can see more of her work on her website and Instagram. (via The Creators Project)

Karan and Nanc in Open Range, 2015. Oil on canvas, 36″ x 60″.

Virginia Eastwood in “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 62″ x 80″.

Rebekah Wayne in True Grit (Study), 2014. Oil on canvas, 30″ x 24″.

Krimmie Wayne in “The Searchers”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 60″ x 40″.

Liakesha Cooper in “High Noon”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 36″ x 48″.

Virginia Wayne Portrait, 2013. Oil on canvas, 30″ x 24″.

Stasha Dean in “Giant”, 2013. Oil on canvas, 90″ x 60″.

 

 



Art

Hyperrealistic Paintings of Bulging, Decorative Rugs by Antonio Santin

February 2, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

"corona" (2015), oil on canvas, 59x98.5 inches, all images via Antonio Santin

“corona” (2015), oil on canvas, 59×98.5 inches, all images via Antonio Santin

Antonio Santin produces works that are nearly impossible to identify as paintings, hyperrealistic depictions of decorative rugs covered in complex floral arrangements and patterns. Each piece is composed of thousands of paint strokes that mimic the texture of a rug’s weave, thick segments of oil paint that transform his nearly five-foot long canvases.

Adding another layer of difficulty to the detailed paintings, Santin includes bulges and creases that appear to obscure large masses beneath his 2D surfaces. Previously working with still lifes, Santin told The Creators Project that the rugs were a way for him to get rid of the figure within his works while still holding on to the outline of its shape. He calls his rug series “figurative paintings without a figure,” eerie pieces that give an illusion of a body hidden beneath the surface.

The New York-based artist was born in Madrid, Spain in 1978, and graduated with a degree in Fine Arts from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2005. You can see more of his rug paintings on his website and Instagram. (via The Creators Project)

“alicia” (2014), oil on canvas, 73×110 inches

"flushing meats" (2014), oil on canvas, 56x98 inches

“flushing meats” (2014), oil on canvas, 56×98 inches

"festland" (2014), oil on canvas, 52x97 inches

“festland” (2014), oil on canvas, 52×97 inches

"incest coin" (2015), oil on canvas, 78 inches

“incest coin” (2015), oil on canvas, 78 inches

"dystopian blues" (2014), oil on canvas, 78x90 inches

“dystopian blues” (2014), oil on canvas, 78×90 inches

"Claire" (2014), oil on canvas, 94 1/2 inches

“Claire” (2014), oil on canvas, 94 1/2 inches

"Claire" (detail) (2014), oil on canvas, 94.5 inches

“Claire” (detail) (2014), oil on canvas, 94.5 inches

 

 



Art

Oil Paintings of Eyes and Mouths on Glass by Henrik Uldalen

February 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of this ongoing series, self-taught painter Henrik Uldalen has been creating depictions of eyes and mouths on glass. The oil paintings are an extension of his focus on classic figurative painting where he explores “the dark sides of life, nihilism, existentialism, longing and loneliness, juxtaposed with fragile beauty.” Uldalen regularly shares his progress on Instagram and a few of these works are available in his shop.
(via My Amy Goes to 11, Juxtapoz)

 

 



Animation Art History

Full Trailer for ‘Loving Vincent,’ a Feature-Length Film Animated by 62,450 Oil Paintings

January 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The full trailer for Loving Vincent (previously here and here), a film examining the life of Vincent van Gogh, has finally been released after nearly six years of creative development. Each of the 62,450 frames for the feature-length film were hand-painted by 115 professional oil painters, and will integrate 94 of Van Gogh’s paintings into the animation. First captured as a live action film, the final oil paintings replicate each shot, recreating the entire film frame-by-frame. Loving Vincent is written and directed by Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman, and produced by Poland’s BreakThru Films and UK’s Trademark Films. You look behind-the-scenes of the film in the video below, as well as keep up-to-date with release information on the film’s Twitter and Facebook.

 

 



Art

Speculative Paintings of a Graffiti-Covered Earth by Josh Keyes

January 18, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

"Descent" (2016), acrylic on panel, 8"x10"

“Descent” (2016), acrylic on panel, 8″x10″

Josh Keyes‘ newest series features subjects both manmade and natural, their common element being several layers of graffiti that cover a space shuttle, a melting iceberg, and even a whale’s tail. For the last ten years these marks had remained in the background of Keyes’ paintings, adding detail to the supporting elements of the environment rather than being integrated into the subjects of his work.

For Keyes, the decision to place graffiti writing in the foreground questions our relationship to the natural world, and what impact we are undeniably leaving on our planet. The iceberg for instance, is marked with the words, “I’ll melt with you.” This blood red message could be the voice of both the iceberg and the tagger, a warning that we will all be melting if we continue to desecrate the Earth.

“Are there things and places that graffiti should not be?” asked Keyes to Colossal. “Who is to say what surface is to be kept graffiti clean? My personal concern is that this will be a reality some day and speaks to a larger issue of our relationship with the natural world. The satellite and space graffiti hints that even if we colonize other worlds, what mark will we leave? No matter where we go there is evidence of our presence.”

Keyes’ will exhibit his paintings later this year with Thinkspace Gallery in LA. You can see more of his works on his Instagram and website.

"Tin Can" (2016), acrylic on panel, 24"x48", all images via Josh Keyes

“Tin Can” (2016), acrylic on panel, 24″x48″, all images via Josh Keyes

"Tin Can" (2016), acrylic on panel, 24"x48"

“Tin Can” (2016), acrylic on panel, 24″x48″

"I'll Melt With You" (2016), acrylic on panel, 12"x18"

“I’ll Melt With You” (2016), acrylic on panel, 12″x16″

"Frontier 2" (2016), acrylic on panel, 12"x16"

“Frontier 2″ (2016), acrylic on panel, 12″x16”

"Frontier" (2015), acrylic on panel, 19"x24"

“Frontier” (2015), acrylic on panel, 19″x24″

 

 



Art

Cubism and Realism Collide in New Murals and Paintings by ‘Belin’

January 11, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Spanish artist Miguel Ángel Belinchón Bujes, or Belin, has long been known in the graffiti world for his photorealistic murals. After a recent trip to Pablo Picasso’s birthplace however, his work has begun to adopt elements of cubism—now producing creative portraits in a style he’s dubbed postneocubismo. His works are often based on loved ones, breaking up elements of their faces in order to recompose eyes, ears, and mouths into distorted configurations.

Although many of his newer works have moved to canvas, he is still very much involved with making work in the public realm, like the above mural he created for last year’s Meeting of Styles’ festival in Cancun, Mexico. You can see more of Belin’s work on his website and Instagram. (via Arrested Motion)

 

 



Art

Hyperrealistic Oil Paintings of Vivid Chrome Masks by Kip Omolade

January 9, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash I, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Brooklyn-based artist Kip Omolade creates large-scale oil paintings of chrome masks, depicting not only the subtle details of female faces, but incorporating the reflected environment of each piece. The series, entitled Diovadiova Chrome, makes reference in part to historical African sculptures, while exploring contemporary aspects of identity, luxury, and immortality. Each piece begins as a mold and cast taken from an actual model which is then utilized as source material for Omolade’s towering paintings which can measure several feet tall.

Diovadiova Chrome portraits historically connect to ancient, realistic African sculptures such as Benin ivory masks and Ife bronze heads,” shares Omolade in his artist statement. “The oil paintings are psychological studies that investigate immortality, the universal masks we all wear and contemporary notions of beauty and luxury. The labor-intensive process involves making a mold and cast of each model’s face, reworking the cast plaster sculpture, producing a version in resin and adding a chrome layer with artificial eyelashes. The final sculpture then serves as a model for the hyper-realistic oil painting. This technique maintains the likeness qualities of portraiture while re-presenting a mask that serves as a conduit between the spiritual and natural world.”

The term Omolade uses to describe the series, Diovadiova, is a word he derived from a combination of the Italian word “Dio” meaning god, and the historical meaning of the word “diva” which is goddess.

Omolade first began his art career working as a graffiti artist while interning at Marvel Comics and The Center for African Art and went on to earn a BFA from the School of Visual Arts. His work was most recently included in the Re:Semblance exhibition at the Redbull House of Art in Detroit and last year’s FREAK OUT! show at Zhou B Art Center. You can follow more of his work on Instagram. (via Creator’s Project)

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn IV, Oil on canvas, 24 x 36 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn I, Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash IV, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash II, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn V, Oil on canvas, 12 x 16 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn III, Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Joyce II, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.