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Art

Intricate Mandalas Gilded with Gold by Artist Asmahan A. Mosleh

November 1, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images courtesy of @murderandrose

UK-based artist Asmahan A. Mosleh spends 8 to 54 hours on a single mandala, publishing photos of her intricate works on her Instagram, @murderandrose. The pieces, often gilded with gold paint, begin with a pencil outline which she then traces in pen, and finally pigment. Pearls of paint are added as final details that give the circular paintings a bit of texture, adding bright pops to the already dense designs. Mosleh also works straight from inception to completion, absorbing herself in the pattern of one artwork before deciding which to begin next.

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Art

Bright Environmental Paintings Focused on Survival by Artist Julie Heffernan

October 25, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Artist Julie Heffernan's paintings are technically complicated, layers of detail filling her often 5-foot-tall canvases. Although enchanting, her environments reference disaster and distress, situations that peek into how we might reposition ourselves in nature after massive traumas such as Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill.

“We are slowly making our world unlivable, and I want to bring to the surface the destructive action, waster, and contamination that is generally invisible to us,” says Heffernan in her artist statement. “I need to imagine another way, to outfit myself with signs and banners that speak louder than I can, to envision how we might remake the world as it is slowly falling apart.”

Another far lighter inspiration Heffernan works with in her paintings is the childhood game of Chutes and Ladders. Like the climbing, twisting, and meandering board game, her paintings allow the eye to crawl up, down, and around the forests and mountains she paints. You can see more of these ambitious landscape works on her portfolio site, and read her own thoughts on painting on her blog, Painters on Paintings. (via Booooooom)

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Art

Artists Turn Their Palettes into Paintings for the Exhibition “Point of Origin”

October 12, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Denis Sarazhin

After completing a series of miniature paintings two years ago, Dina Brodsky (previously) turned to her palette, experimenting with the tool of the series’ creation until it became a work of its own. During a studio visit with a friend she noticed he too had created a work on an old palette, however the work was far different than her own. This discovery led Brodsky to investigate other artists’ palettes and how they might manipulate them into works, inviting both friends and strangers to experiment with their palettes.

“Everyone I asked made a phenomenal painting, and because they were sharing the images on social media, a few other artists asked if they could participate,” said Brodsky to Colossal. “It grew from there, almost like a conversation that was happening via palette paintings and social media amongst artists all over the globe.”

The rapid expansion of palettes has even led to an antique 19th century palette from Spain, which Brodsky believes to be a sketch from Luis Pidal Menendez, a 19th century painter from Barcelona. This historic painting, as well as 51 other works from Brodsky’s friends and larger artist community, will be on display at The Lodge Gallery in New York City in an exhibition titled Point of Origin from October 13 to November 13, 2016. The exhibition is curated by Brodsky and curator Trek Lexington.

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James Adelman

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Alonsa Guevara

Dina Brodsky in progress

Dina Brodsky in progress

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Christian Fagerlund

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Joshua Henderson

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Amber Lia-Kloppel

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Tim Lowly

 

 



Art

Artist Leon Tarasewicz Covers the Poland National Gallery’s Great Hall Staircase in Splatter Paint

September 29, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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The Great Hall during the exhibition “Polish Painting of the 21st Century,” Leon Tarasewicz, 2006, photo: Sebastian Madejski. All images via We Are Museums

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Back in 2006, Warsaw’s National Gallery of Art, Zachęta, held a group exhibition titled “Polish Painting of the 21st Century.” Painter Leon Tarasewicz contributed a site-specific work to the 60-artist exhibition, redoing the museum’s Great Hall in a bath of red, yellow, blue, and green splatter paint. The work splattered the stairs and crept up the surrounding walls, creating a dramatic entrance for anyone entering the exhibition. (via ArchAtlas which was inexplicably deleted by Tumblr last week?)

 

 



Art Design

Cosmic Hand-Painted Animal Gloves by Artist Bunnie Reiss

September 19, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Artist Bunnie Reiss enjoys transforming the old into new, and has spent her life as a collector of weathered objects with rich stories. Reiss’s ongoing project turns her collection of old leather gloves into bright works of art, utilizing symmetry and cosmic imagery to connect both the past and present. The gloves are not obvious references to animal faces, but subtle gestures that reference eyes, ears, and noses within their design.

In addition to painting smaller works, Reiss also creates large installations and mural walls. Her most recent work is a 3,500 square foot mural painted on the east side of Milwaukee for the Black Cat Mural Alley. You can see more of her large and small-scale works on her website and Instagram. (via The Fox is Black)

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Art History Illustration

150th Anniversary Edition of “Alice in Wonderland” Features Rare 1969 Salvador Dalí Illustrations

September 15, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Advice From a Caterpillar

While glancing at Salvador Dalí’s paintings one might get the sense that they’ve tripped down their mind’s own rabbit hole, all of a sudden dropped within a barren wasteland filed with abstract objects and creatures. The pairing then, of Dalí and Alice in Wonderland writer and mathematician Lewis Carroll, seem perfectly matched—two men whose minds travel far beyond the cutesy corners of an average fairytale. In the 1960s an editor at Random House realized this genius partnership, commissioning Dalí to illustrate an exclusive edition of Alice in Wonderland, of which Dalí signed every copy.

This rare edition of Alice was long coveted by rare book collectors and scholars, making only occasional appearances for study or the auction block. However, for the 150th anniversary of Lewis’ surrealist tale, this one-of-a-kind collaboration has finally been printed for the public by Princeton University Press. The deluxe edition, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, features an introduction explaining Dalí’s connection to Carroll by Lewis Carroll Society of North America President Mark Burstein, and exploration by mathematician Thomas Banchoff of the mathematics found in Dalí’s work and illustrations. (via Brain Pickings, Lost at E Minor)

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Down the Rabbit Hole

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The Pool of Tears

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The Queen’s Croquet Ground

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The Caucus Race and a Long Tale

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The Rabbit Sends in a Little Bill

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Pig and Pepper

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Mad Tea Party

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Alice’s Evidence

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The Mock Turtle’s Story

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The Lobster’s Quadrille

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Frontispiece for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

 

 



Art

Geometric Watercolors by Artist Jacob Van Loon

September 14, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Recent Colorado transplant Jacob van Loon creates geometric watercolors that seem to visually reference abstract architectural renderings. The colors in his works look as if they have bled beyond recognition of a specific site or landmark, yet still retain a strict set of dense and chaotic lines. The paintings trap specific colors in the boxes of their grid-like surface, yet also allow some to traverse throughout the work, alternating between clean and hazy sections of muted blues and bright oranges.

“By the time I have a final sketch, the layers of primer are caked up and full of valleys and ridges created by broad brush strokes,” van Loon told The Creator’s Project. “When I’m ready for color, it’s not just about pragmatically filling in the spaces, it’s about putting paint down, letting it travel in the valleys and ridges, and seeing where and how it all comes to rest.”

Last year van Loon was commissioned by the band Explosions in the Sky and Temporary Residence Ltd to create the cover art for their album The Wilderness. A video of the making of the work titled 8th and Main can be see above, and final images of the work below. Van Loon’s work will be included in the upcoming group exhibition “How High” at Left Field in San Luis Obispo, CA, and you can see more of his gridded watercolor works on his Instagram and Behance.

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“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

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“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

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“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

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“Pershing” (2014), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 32″x48″

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“Pershing” (2014), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 32″x48″

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“Haish” (2015), watercolor and graphite on wood, 22″x30″

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“Haish” (2015), watercolor and graphite on wood, 22″x30″

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